#1
Hey everybody. I use a Boss DS-1 distortion pedal, which is a pretty average distortion pedal, pretty versatile, does all i need, but i want it to do more. Specifically, i want to be able to make it sound REALLY bad.

Stupid idea right? Probably. But see when the 9 volt battery starts getting low, the light stops going on. This happened so i accidentally stepped on it when I wasn't using it and left it like that for a few hours and the battery ran really low. Practically dead. So when i tried to use it, i got this gritty, crappy fuzz tone from it which i thought was really cool and bluesy sounding. So i was wondering if there was a way i could immolate this tone with some kind of mod. I would really like to be able to switch from this to the pedal sounding normal. I dont know anything about how pedals work so i dont know if its possible or not, but i am handy with a soldering iron, and i am willing to try my hand at it

If anyone wants i can try to post a sound post and pictures of the pedal

Thanks in advance to anyone who can lend any suggestions
#2
A fuzz pedal ? I think Boss makes them
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#4
Quote by Rizzo228
A fuzz pedal ? I think Boss makes them


Im sure they do, but i dont want to buy another pedal. Besides, this thing sounds like crap fuzz. Not good fuzz. Its hard to describe. ill try to get a sound clip up
#5
Quote by innertom
a lower voltage power supply?


how would i make this work? i mean its specifically made for a nine volt to fit it...?
#8
that thing is sweet! thanks guys! will it work for bass pedals to? im assuming so, but i figured it would be a safe than sorry situation
#9
you could make a little box that is just a voltage divider or build it into the pedal. all it would need is a switch if you wanted fixed level, or a pot if you wanted variable.

the other thing i wanted to mention is this thing called circuit bending. see here. its another way to give it a grittier, harsher sound. did one of them to my ds-1, makes it a bit more interesting (i think, havent used it in ages).
#10
On a related note, seeing as it would be much cheaper to build your own voltage regulator, does anyone know if there is any benefit to using a voltage divider, as opposed to just increasing the series reisitance?
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#11
more control would be my first though. just adding resistance might not do exactly what you want, but a voltage divider should if you set it up correctly. a series resistance is more going to simulate the actual battery dying (thats what happens in a dying battery).

the voltage divider is going to instead give you, well, a voltage divider. it is going to set the voltage and simulate the dying battery that way. basicly two ways to achieve the same end, i would do the voltage divider myself.
#12
Quote by jof1029
a series resistance is more going to simulate the actual battery dying

Isn't that exactly what we're trying to do? Maybe I'll have to build one and put in an series resistance/voltage divider switch.
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#14
What about running it at 3 or 4.5 or 6v with AA's?

I have an ancient Coron distortion pedal, copy of an MXR. It sounds so bad its cool.
#15
Quote by FUT55

Stupid idea right? Probably. But see when the 9 volt battery starts getting low, the light stops going on. This happened so i accidentally stepped on it when I wasn't using it and left it like that for a few hours and the battery ran really low. Practically dead. So when i tried to use it, i got this gritty, crappy fuzz tone from it which i thought was really cool and bluesy sounding. So i was wondering if there was a way i could immolate this tone with some kind of mod. I would really like to be able to switch from this to the pedal sounding normal. I dont know anything about how pedals work so i dont know if its possible or not, but i am handy with a soldering iron, and i am willing to try my hand at it

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#16
Buy a spider 3
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#18
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Quote by handbanana
wiliscool is just plain dumb
#19
Quote by asfastasdark
No, this is exactly what you're looking for.
http://www.beavisaudio.com/products/devolt/index.html


Interesting, i've got pretty much a similar thing on my wall wart which lets you adjust the voltage between 3 and 12v. That would work a lot better with a foot style pot adjustment thingy like a wah or volume pedal though instead of just a big knob surley?
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#20
Quote by wiliscool
Isn't that exactly what we're trying to do? Maybe I'll have to build one and put in an series resistance/voltage divider switch.

well, what happens with a battery is the internal resistance goes up and the voltage goes down as the battery dies. so if the pedal draws the same current as normal, there is a voltage drop over the resistor. so i guess it makes sense and works. but to me it always seemed electrically, well, stupid. i have no idea where i am going with this. the series resistance actually may be the better option in some cases, but you have less direct voltage control.