#1
I found a really neat interval, but I don't know which interval it is. (I don't know much at all about intervals. I still need to learn them). It is this one:


E
B
G --4 <-- ROOT NOTE
D 4--
A
E


Now, the root note is very important. This seems like a 4th, if played like a power chord shape. But when playing something on the G string, for example:


E
B
G 4--4-6-7-9-7--7-4
D --4------------7---
A
E


It gives it a really nice, classical sound. What interval is this?
Last edited by robinlint at Sep 12, 2009,
#2
if the root is the 4 on the G, then it's an interval of a 5th going downwards
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
#3
Typically you always count intervals from the lowest note, so it's a 4th.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#4
Quote by pigeonmafia
if the root is the 4 on the G, then it's an interval of a 5th going downwards

Intervals go downwards?
#5
Quote by steven seagull
Typically you always count intervals from the lowest note, so it's a 4th.

Hmm. Thanks
#6
As you're playing it as single notes, the interval is taken from the starting note to the next note. As you are going from a B to an F#

G|-4---
D|----4

that's an interval of a 5th.
When you go back up

G|----4
D|-4---
thats F# - B, so an interval of a 4th.

But if played as a chord

G|-4
D|-4

the interval is taken from the bass note, so tthe 44 chord would be a 4th (or, as Mike_Atherton below has said, an inverted 5th chord)
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
Last edited by pigeonmafia at Sep 12, 2009,
#7
Quote by robinlint
Intervals go downwards?


An interval is the distance between 2 notes, so they go in both directions..The interval between D and A for example will be the same in both directions but when you play it dependingon whether you go up or down will give a different sound, ie D to A sounds different to A to D.

In this case tis a 4th as your goin from F# to B, however if you were to flip it and to go B to f# it would be a 5th.

...and just for a bit extra if you played them simultaneously it would be an inverted B5 Chord (Powerchord)
#8
Quote by pigeonmafia
As you're playing it as single notes, the interval is taken from the starting note to the next note. As you are going from a B to an F#

G|-4---
D|----4

that's an interval of a 5th.

Ah, I see. Thanks


When you go back up

G|----4
D|-4---
thats F# - B, so an interval of a 4th.

Thanks. So, the root note of a melodic interval is always the note you are currently playing?


But if played as a chord

G|-4
D|-4

the interval is taken from the bass note, so the 44 chord would be a 4th

Thanks. Is the bass note of a chord always the root?
#9
Yes, if you're playing single notes, the start of an interval is the note you're playing. So an interval can go downwards.

Chords can have multiple names, like the chord we have posted here

G|-4-
D|-4-

That can have the bass 4 as the root, making it a '4th' chord (F#4), or have the top 4 as the root, making it an inverted 5th chord (Inverted B5). So the bass note is not always the root, although I think chords are usualy named with the bass note as the root unless explicitly stated other wise
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
Last edited by pigeonmafia at Sep 12, 2009,
#10
Bass note is not always the root, when you use a different note than the root as the bass note it's an inversion.

For example:
E - 5
B - 5
G - 5

E - 8
B- 10
G- 9

and

E- 12
B- 13
G - 14

are all A minor chords cos they all contain the notes A, C and E
Super Leeds and Classy Cas!
#12
You always count an interval from the lowest note, even if the higher one comes first. If for example i have two notes:

e-----5--------------------
B-----5-------------------

That is the interval of a perfect fourth, even though E to B is a perfect 5th, this interval is a 4th.
#13
Yes the interval is a perfect fourth, but depending on context it could also be used as an inverted fifth.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#15
The interval is a perfect fourth. Intervals are always counted from the bottom note up. The root of the piece is irrelevant.
#17
Intervals is intervals....they're all the same. You count from the lowest note to ensure consistency, otherwise nobody else would know for definite what you were talking about.

The two notes are a perfect 4th apart, you can refer to them as an inverted fifth depending on the context because again that ensures you know that the reference point is the c# on the D string, but not just as a "a fifth".
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#18
Quote by branny1982
No, i think you are incorrect.

Intervals can be up or down!

Are you specifically talking about harmonic intervals? What about melodic intervals?


If asked to indentify and interval between two notes you ALWAYS do it from the lowest.

Lets say we have a C chord in 1st inversion spelt E C E G.

The interval from E to C is a Minor 6th. Although in the chord E is the Major third of C, The interval is a m6 because you always count from the lowest note.
#19
Quote by griffRG7321
If asked to indentify and interval between two notes you ALWAYS do it from the lowest.



Not necessarily.

You can have descending or ascending melodic intervals.

C up to G = P5

C down to G = P4

In the case of harmonic intervals calculating up from the lowest note, or down from the highest = same answer.
shred is gaudy music
#20
why all the confusion over something so simple? why is everybody saying the same thing over and over? is it really necessary 20 people to say the exact same thing in different ways?
#21
its an inverted 5th (powerchord) or a 4th. End of discussion. As its a dyad, it really depends on the other stuff going on to determine how its going to sound.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#22
Yes, i don't really want to argue over a trivial matter.... but people are making fairly bold statements and i'm not sure where they are getting there information from.

The whole point of 'intervals' is to give reference from one point to another, this can be increasing or decreasing in pitch.
#23
Quote by The4thHorsemen
why all the confusion over something so simple? why is everybody saying the same thing over and over? is it really necessary 20 people to say the exact same thing in different ways?


Aww cmon, how long have you been posting at UG? You're not used to this yet?

Quote by branny1982
Yes, i don't really want to argue over a trivial matter.... but people are making fairly bold statements and i'm not sure where they are getting there information from.

The whole point of 'intervals' is to give reference from one point to another, this can be increasing or decreasing in pitch.


+ 1
shred is gaudy music
#24
Quote by GuitarMunky
Aww cmon, how long have you been posting at UG? You're not used to this yet?


well, yea, I've gotten used to it with other stuff, but when people decide to argue for half a page on something as simple as intervals I get kinda irritated… and I just woke up like 30 minutes ago fairly mad at my friend for keeping me up last night when I had just gotten my sleeping back on track.
#25
Quote by GuitarMunky
Not necessarily.

You can have descending or ascending melodic intervals.

C up to G = P5

C down to G = P4

In the case of harmonic intervals calculating up from the lowest note, or down from the highest = same answer.


You're thinking in terms of key and not the actually notes. Yes G is the fifth of C.

Quote by The AB Guide To Music Theory Part 1

An interval is calculated from the bottom note even though the bottom note may not be the key note. Thus the interval from C# to A is always a minor 6th in whatever key it occurs because it is always described as though the bottom note is the key note.


Quote by branny1982
I think you should reconsider taking the 'AB Guide to Music Theory' as your gospel.



Yes i should take the advice of people on the internet and not the teachings of a legitimate theory book...
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Sep 12, 2009,
#26
Quote by griffRG7321
You're thinking in terms of key and not the actually notes. Yes G is the fifth of C.



dude, it just depends on the context of how you're describing the interval. if you are playing it in harmony, then yes, would just refer to it from the bass note. but if you were describing how a melody moved, as in a linear order like 5-7-8-7-3 then you can refer to descending intervals as (take a guess) descending intervals. I wish this thread would just die.
#28
Quote by griffRG7321
You're thinking in terms of key and not the actually notes. Yes G is the fifth of C.


No I'm not, I'm talking about intervals.


What is G up to D ?....

What is D down to G ?


the answer for both is a perfect 5th.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 12, 2009,
#30
I think people are confusing two concepts here. If you go from a C to the very next G, it is a 5th. Regardless of whether or not you go from the top note to the bottom or from the bottom to the top. Sure going from any given C to any given G can be a fourth or a fifth of some octave degree. Do you know what I mean?