#1
I've been using them for as long as I can remember, I play songs with them, creates songs with them, but I still don't know what to call them when I tell people to play them (for example)

I know they are basicly power chords (from what i've understood) but what are they called?

Lemme just play around with the tab and show you these chords I can't name


E---------------|---------------|--------------
B---------------|---------------|------------
G---------------|---------------|-------------
D---------------|---------------|-------------
A------7--8----|---5----------|-6----------
E------7--7----|---7----------|-7--------------


lol bear in mind I did not try to create anything musical so please don't tell me I suck, they are just random notes..

But I just want an explanation to what to call these (power chords)

Thanks alot!
...What!?
#2
E---------------|---------------|--------------
B---------------|---------------|------------
G---------------|---------------|-------------
D---------------|---------------|-------------
A------7--8----|---5----------|-6----------
E------7--7----|---7----------|-7--------------


the first one is a forth, the second one a flat fifth, the third one is a third and last but not least, that's a flat forth
#3
Ah right, so it's those names i've got to learn! Thanks! Just gotta go learn some chord theory to learn which one is which.
...What!?
Last edited by Ergin at Sep 12, 2009,
#4
you know i googled whether its bear in mind or bare in mind and turns out you were right, it's bear in mind. Learn something everyday, thanks.


As for the chords you can try a chord tool on google
#5
None of them are chords. The first is a fourth, the second is a flat fifth, the third is a minor dyad and the last one is a major dyad, not a flat fourth.
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#6
Quote by mmkat
E---------------|---------------|--------------
B---------------|---------------|------------
G---------------|---------------|-------------
D---------------|---------------|-------------
A------7--8----|---5----------|-6----------
E------7--7----|---7----------|-7--------------


the first one is a forth, the second one a flat fifth, the third one is a third and last but not least, that's a flat forth


The third one is a minor third and last one is a major third, also this can all change if we consider the other note the root instead of the B and they are intervals not chords.
Last edited by DVN12 at Sep 12, 2009,
#7
Okay im starting to understand the consept of these.. what do I call them if they are not chords? flats, fifts?

How hard is it learn which fifts, flats, dyads is which?
...What!?
#8
Technically it takes three notes to form a chord. A dyad consists of two notes, a tonic and a third. If this sounds like gibberish take a look at the lessons on www.musictheory.net
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#10
what you need to do to work out the chords for yourself is find how many semitones are between the root note (normally the lowest) and each of the other notes in the chord.
intervals are pretty easy to name too.

number of semitones
0= perfect unison
1 = augmented unison/minor second
2 = major 2nd/ diminished 3rd
3= augmented 2nd/minor 3rd
4= major 3rd/diminished 4th
5= augmented 3rd/perfect 4th
6= augmented 4th/dimished 5th
7= perfect 5th/diminished 6th
8= augmented 5th/minor 6th
9= major 6th/dimished 7th
10=augmented 6th/minor 7th
11=major 7th/diminished octave
12=octave

bold = most common name

EDIT: technically 2 noes isn't a chord, it's a dyad, but you can apply the same chord theory to naming it i guess
EDIT2: see below
Last edited by doive at Sep 12, 2009,
#11
Quote by doive

11=major 7th/diminished unison


Actually, 11 semitones would be a diminished OCTAVE, not a diminished unison. And 12 semitones is an octave, not a unison. At least, I was always taught that the unison interval only occurs on the same note in the same octave.

Also, there's no such thing as a diminished unison. A unison is perfect, yes? Well, to make a perfect interval diminished, you must make it smaller. You can't get smaller than 0 half steps. So no matter whether you raise the note or lower it, it will always be an augmented unison (one half step larger than a perfect unison).
Last edited by timeconsumer09 at Sep 12, 2009,
#12
^ yer you're probably right. i'll edit it now. they're so rarely used that i never really bothered to think about it too much :p
#13
Quote by DVN12
Also this can all change if we consider the other note the root instead of the B
does it?

A|-7--|
E|---7|

B is a perfect fourth interval down from an E root.


A|---7|
E|-7--|

E is a perfect fourth up from a B root.

Whatever the root note (whether the B or the E), the interval is the same up or down - a perfect fourth in this case.

It only becomes a different interval if you invert it - that is actually move one of the notes an octave so that it appears on the other side of the other note. (so moving the B up an octave or the E down an octave)

B is a perfect fourth below E
D|-----|
A|---7|
E|-7--|

and a perfect fifth above E
D|---9|
A|-7--|
E|-----|
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 13, 2009,
#14
^^^ Great explanation. I think most people think measuring from intervals means measuring scale degrees (so people would call the interval from the top note a fifth, when it is a fourth). But the way you explained it is very clear. Lots of interval questions popping up lately :-p