#2
You make an arpeggio by playing the notes of a chord individually.

You turn them into sweeps by sweeping them.

In short, learn theory - learn the notes on the fretboard, learn the major scale and learn about intervals and chord construction.
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#3
Quote by steven seagull
You turn them into sweeps by sweeping them.

This
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#4
To be fair, some ways of playing arpeggios are easier than others, and for everything you can play on a guitar, there are myriad different places to do the same thing. Experiment with fingerings and string combinations until you have two or three major ones you can play well. Then take the minor, diminished and augmented variations of those shapes, extend them to 7th, 9th, and 13th degrees. Once you're comfortable with that, invert them. You'll have an arpeggio for every possible situation. Try writing a short etude (exercise) so you can work on your skills.
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Last edited by kevinm4435 at Sep 12, 2009,
#5
Well there are a couple shapes for arpeggios. The 3 string ones are just the top 3 strings of these ones... I did them at the 12th fret to be arbitrary. They're pretty much just broken up chords, you can do them in barre chord shape or in some other shape that I don't know what it's called, but I prefer them. Here are a couple shapes to practice:

e----------------12--15--12----------------|
b------------13---------------13------------|
g--------12----------------------12---------| Major Shape
d----14------------------------------14-----|
a-15-------------------------------------15-|
e----------------------------------------------|

e----------------11--15--11----------------|
b------------13---------------13------------|
g--------12----------------------12---------|
d----13------------------------------13-----| Minor Shape
a-15-------------------------------------15-|
e----------------------------------------------|

e----------------------12-17-12--------------------|
b------------------14-------------14----------------|
g--------------14---------------------14------------| Major Barre Chord shape
d----------14----------------------------14---------|
a-12--16-----------------------------------16--12--|
e------------------------------------------------------|

e----------------------12-17-12--------------------|
b------------------13-------------14----------------|
g--------------14---------------------14------------| Minor Barre Chord shape
d----------14----------------------------14---------|
a-12--15-----------------------------------15-12--|
e------------------------------------------------------|


Hope that helps for the shapes. They're moveable as well, the intervals stay the same, but you can move them up and down the fretboard. As for sweeping, it's just practice, there are a bunch of video lessons here that are good.
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Last edited by muse-ik at Sep 12, 2009,
#6
Ok... Seagull answered your question literally, which really isn't what I think you're looking for. If you want to know the patterns typically used for sweeping licks, download a tab for the song Serrana by Jason Becker. There's an arpeggio section in there that will have all the patterns you're looking to learn, just move them around to your liking.
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#7
Sweeping is a technique;

You don't necessarily have to sweep an arpeggio.

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#8
muse-Ik what is the tonic in those arpeggios?
Last edited by badger10 at Sep 14, 2009,
#9
Quote by badger10
muse-Ik what is the tonic in those arpeggios?



It's the first note of every shape.

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