#1
Anways I've been at it for about a month and a half, I started seeing huge improvements in my finger strength before, to the point were I felt like if I had hit the gym hard. I feel at this point my fingers should be much stronger than they are. When I try to do big stretches my wrist cocks into an angle I feel like it shouldn't be at, I can't reach far unless I do this. Anyone know why?
#3
dude, you've been playing for a month and a half. patience is what you need
#4
Do u mean, you end up with your wrist at right angles to your arm? If so, that's just how you stretch. Try and move your arm till it's straight in line with your wrist to make it feel easier and reduce fatigue
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#5
Thanks for the replies.
Mashizz, I'm in no rush... I'm only worried because I feel like my fingers are getting weaker. If they plateau that's expected as with anything, but I feel like they are getting weaker.

Pigeo, I think I got what your saying. My wrist ends up at a right angle, like paralell with my body sort of? I'm not sure what you mean by
http://www.prrp-music.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/guitar.jpg
exactly like this little girl's wrist haha, Is this a bad habit or is it completely fine.
#6
A month is nothing, you're still getting used to the thing...you're not going to be seeing anything you can really class as "improvement". Also it's not really about strength, what matters more than anything else is the level of control you have over your fingers.

Just be patient, things will be up and down over the next few months until your hands get used to what it is you're asking them to do.
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#7
Yeh, one month isn't fast enough to have dominance on the fretboard, in time it will come, where your calluses will grow and you will have more stamina in your wrist and little forearm starin.
Also, it may not make much difference but having a good diet helps, gettting the right foods and a recommended intake of protein can't do any harm.
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
A month is nothing, you're still getting used to the thing...you're not going to be seeing anything you can really class as "improvement". Also it's not really about strength, what matters more than anything else is the level of control you have over your fingers.

Just be patient, things will be up and down over the next few months until your hands get used to what it is you're asking them to do.

As someone who went through this a year or so back... *points up* this is pretty much spot on.

That month you've spent is both nothing and everything. It's nothing because your hands, your fretting hand especially, have a hell of a lot to learn, and if you keep at it they will learn it. It's everything because you can't have the second month without the first one, nor the third without the second (etc). There are probably millions of people alive today who've quit guitar at your stage because they felt they were getting nowhere, and they didn't recognise just how important those first steps were. Keep at it and you'll take that step ahead of them, and most importantly you'll take that step to where you want to be.

* cough *

Somewhat OT, but the only point of disagreement I have with Herr Seagull here is the importance of strength. A year or so in, my fretting hand looks like a Turkish power-lifter compared to my picking hand. Yes, I'll happily agree that the name of the game is precise control of finger placement and pressure application, but I won't accept that it doesn't require a degree of ooomph to achieve this. Put it this way... if you pick up a light object, it's easy to position it carefully. Pick up an object that's a bit too heavy for you to carry comfortably (try 50kg bags of house coal...) then your muscles will shake and you'll lose that precision. Conclusion... in order to achieve precision in any physical operation you need an excess of muscle strength so as not to be operating at the limits.
Oh, now I've gone and spilled my tea. This really won't do at all.
#9
I got no intentions of quitting guys, just like to check up to make sure I'm doing all I can do. Thanks for the responses. I Def. notice a improvement in control. Fingers are landing where I want them too.