#1
I've been thinking. I know a whole lot about guitar. I know what humbuckers and single coils do, I know the difference between SS and tube amps. I (probably) know more than most salesmen in Guitar Center. But as for bass...I know nothing, and it's bugging me. I play bass a lot more professional than I do guitar (guitar is just a hobby, I take bass a lot more seriously), but my knowledge doesn't show it. So, what are some good things to read to make me more knowledgeable of bass?

tl;dr: Educate me about bass.
#3
The man tells the truth. It may not be perfect, but it will have loads of information. Plus, a lot of stuff will be similar to guitar.
#4
I think you need to be more specific in your questions. Maybe even make a list of questions and we'll answer what we can
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#5
Quote by gilly_90
I think you need to be more specific in your questions. Maybe even make a list of questions and we'll answer what we can

Ok.

What's the tonal difference between single coils, split coils, and humbuckers?
What are the different kinds of bridges?
What does having an active EQ do for your tone?
What is an ideal tone for bass? (Yes, I know there's different tones for different music, but I mean for most genres)
Tube vs. Solid state
What's the difference between active and passive pickups on bass?

I know I said I know about the Tube vs solid state and what single coils and humbuckers do, but that's just for guitar.
#6
Quote by Alex Vik
Ok.

What's the tonal difference between single coils, split coils, and humbuckers?
What are the different kinds of bridges?
What does having an active EQ do for your tone?
What is an ideal tone for bass? (Yes, I know there's different tones for different music, but I mean for most genres)
Tube vs. Solid state
What's the difference between active and passive pickups on bass?

I know I said I know about the Tube vs solid state and what single coils and humbuckers do, but that's just for guitar.


Pretty much, the sound gets fatter respectively

Do you mean like the difference between brands?

If your asking what I think, it just means you can adjust some combination of treble/mids/bass from your bass, without having to go to the amps EQ

Basically, a nice fat, clean, punchy tone will cover you for anything.

Tubes if you can afford them (unless you want a crunchy tone)

Active pick ups use a battery and can detect more frequencies than passive pick ups
#7
Quote by tubatom868686
Do you mean like the difference between brands?

I mean different types. I know for guitar there's Tune-O-Matic, Bigsby, Vintage Trem, Floyd Rose, Hard Tail, and I think some more.

And thanks for the rest of the help.
#8
Well, a single is still going to give a round sound, but humbuckers have that thump! to them. They tend to push amps harder to distort, like on guitar, but a single coil sounds clear and crisp.
Bridges...hmmm...with bass, there are only 2. Through body and top load. Pretty easy to understand. Through bodies have a more solid connection with the body wood and therefore, resonate more. But, a top load bridge is easier to adjust and can still give good resonance, but i feel they rely on percussive attack.
Active Eq's give more control to a bassist...think of it as 5 eq pedals at your feet, all set to different, but usable settings. They are made to shape the sound, before the amp. They are not tone knobs, as they tend to keep the flavor of the bass intact.
Ideal tone...think Stephan Lessard from Dave Matthews Band. Other bassist with said tone- Tal Wilkenfeld. I can't describe it. It's just amazing.
Tube/SS-Tube=good...SS=still, good...but dry. Not a huge jarring difference like from guitar, but still a difference.
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#9
Quote by Alex Vik
I mean different types. I know for guitar there's Tune-O-Matic, Bigsby, Vintage Trem, Floyd Rose, Hard Tail, and I think some more.

And thanks for the rest of the help.


Pretty much all basses use the same type of bridge more or less. Theres different shapes and designs, but theres no floyd rose and such
#10
The tube vs. solid state difference in bass isn't as big of a deal as it is with guitar. With guitar, tubes are pretty much needed. With bass, when it comes to higher end stuff, tubes are optional. Look at Gallien-Krueger. No tubes, great sound.
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#11
What's the tonal difference between single coils, split coils, and humbuckers? Same as on guitar, split coil is just a humbucker they all have distinct sounds that you just have to hear
What are the different kinds of bridges? Same again, except you deal with higher mass bridges more because they help sustain
What does having an active EQ do for your tone? It allows you to adjust your tone to your liking before having your amp color your tone
What is an ideal tone for bass? (Yes, I know there's different tones for different music, but I mean for most genres) Tone is subjective, but a clean tone is used a lot more often
Tube vs. Solid state? Same as on guitar, but solid states are used more because they can get a good clean tone, it's ss distortion that is not desirable
What's the difference between active and passive pickups on bass? Same as guitar
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#12
Quote by aceofbass131
Well, a single is still going to give a round sound, but humbuckers have that thump! to them. They tend to push amps harder to distort, like on guitar, but a single coil sounds clear and crisp.
Bridges...hmmm...with bass, there are only 2. Through body and top load. Pretty easy to understand. Through bodies have a more solid connection with the body wood and therefore, resonate more. But, a top load bridge is easier to adjust and can still give good resonance, but i feel they rely on percussive attack.
Active Eq's give more control to a bassist...think of it as 5 eq pedals at your feet, all set to different, but usable settings. They are made to shape the sound, before the amp. They are not tone knobs, as they tend to keep the flavor of the bass intact.
Ideal tone...think Stephan Lessard from Dave Matthews Band. Other bassist with said tone- Tal Wilkenfeld. I can't describe it. It's just amazing.
Tube/SS-Tube=good...SS=still, good...but dry. Not a huge jarring difference like from guitar, but still a difference.


bridges will differ between brand and model as much as with guitars. You also forgot trem bridges.

EDIT: I also agree that tubes are not needed. I prefer solid state power amps.
Quote by UraniYum
Fuck you I'm trying to be caring and shit


Quote by Cb4rabid
Okay guys, I have a confession to make. Not really a confession since it's something that's been bugging me for awhile but I've always been in denial about it.

**** you gilly, it's not what you think
Last edited by gilly_90 at Sep 13, 2009,
#13
tubes get raped by a lot slapping, generally its better to stick to solid state unless you really like the tone and have the cash to replace tubes many times
#14
What's the tonal difference between single coils, split coils, and humbuckers?
Pretty much the same as guitar.
What are the different kinds of bridges?
Not much of a difference, top load, body load, etc... there's some tremolos but these are pretty rare. Also, sometimes the bridge will be larger (high mass bridge) to increase sustain and resonation.
What does having an active EQ do for your tone?
Just lets you change the bass sound before it goes to the amp.
What is an ideal tone for bass? (Yes, I know there's different tones for different music, but I mean for most genres)
Clear, punchy, defined, audible.
Tube vs. Solid state
Solid state is better for a clean tone. Solid state distortion sounds like crap, though. I believe tubes are a bit more warm sounding.
What's the difference between active and passive pickups on bass?
Same as guitar.
#15
What's the tonal difference between single coils, split coils, and humbuckers?
Similar to guitar for singles and humbuckers. Split coils(P-pickups) have more mid range response than either, and have more of a thump to them.
What are the different kinds of bridges?
Bridges really vasy too much between brands to try and explain this. They really don't change the tone that much though.
What does having an active EQ do for your tone?
It basically does the same thing as the preamp in your amp. Usually the basses tone will be more modern, and sometimes a bit more "sterile".
What is an ideal tone for bass? (Yes, I know there's different tones for different music, but I mean for most genres)
Clean and defined, but with a solid low end and lots of growl.
Tube vs. Solid state
Tubes usually mean a fecking heavy head...some are more than 75 lbs.
Other than that, tubes give a warmer sound and pleasant distortion, but color the sound quite a bit. Solid state gives a cleaner, clearer sound with much more headroom. Bass amps also commonly use Class D amps, which use a digital switching power supply. They sound basically the same as a normal ss amp, but usually way under 5-6 pounds. Mark Bass amps are a good example of this.
What's the difference between active and passive pickups on bass?
Same as on guitar, but basses usually have much more elaborate preamps. A guitar might just have a boost knob, while a bass usually has a 2 or 3 band eq. Basses also commonly have active preamps with passive pickups. Few basses actually have true active pickups.
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Last edited by Mutant Corn at Sep 13, 2009,
#16
Can I just point out that the only difference between a humbucker on a guitar and a humbucker on bass is the size.

Technically speaking they are exactly the same thing, if you string a guitar with bass strings would would be able to get a sound from it in the exact same way.
You would also bugger your neck, by that's neither here no there.
#17
Quote by Mutant Corn
A guitar might just have a boost knob, while a bass usually has a 2 or 3 band eq.

I always wondered about that, why do they limit themselves?

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#18
This thread is pointless i think, go try bass's and see the difference for your self. Go onto a site and look at different bridges and then see how they effecty bass's. Its how most of use found out about stuff like this.
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#19
Quote by m4l666
I always wondered about that, why do they limit themselves?
Because guitars generally have pickup selectors which is what most guitarists think will suit their tone changes.