#2
A lot of jazz is based on II V I being repeated over and over again, but with a lot of chord substitutions.

also look at III VI II V I
which is like a II V I, but then one is also the V of the next II V I progression..
#4
correct.
I'm not sure what you are doing with the dorian/mixolydian stuff.. but yeah, thats what it is.

III VI II V I in G would be

B E A D G

See how the A is not only acting as a II for G, but also as a I for the B and E.
#5
Quote by KTHXBAI
Alrighty thanks, to clear up II V I, that would be (in g maj?) A (Dorian), D (Mixolydian), G (ionian).

And would i play A minor, D maj, G maj? Or minor 7ths or what not. Thanks for the help!

A typical ii-V-I in G major would be Am7 D7 G. There's no need need to bring out modes since this is a diatonic progression in G.
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#6
Quote by mdwallin
correct.
I'm not sure what you are doing with the dorian/mixolydian stuff.. but yeah, thats what it is.

III VI II V I in G would be

B E A D G

See how the A is not only acting as a II for G, but also as a I for the B and E.

Ahh the trusty chain of fifths. Each chord acts as a V to the next chord.

B is the V to E which is the V to A which is the V to D which is the V to G? You can carry this thing on as long as you want...

....C# F# B E A D G C F Bb Eb........etc...etc

or you can try the diatonic chain of fifths as in 7even's example.

If you want jazz I'd advise chord substitutions as the way to go, like mdwallin said earlier.
Si
#8
bII - i and i - vi are common in metal. III - I is common in major metal. However, you can get away with just about any.
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#9
In choral writing, you end with a I iii vi ii V7 I, or vii^o I. If you want a churchy feel, end IV I. the classical minor feeling is the harmonic minor scale which ends ii^o V i (bouree by bach; its in the live heartbreaker solo by led zeppelin if you clueless).

I am a fan of using one chord and changing one note in that chord to make a completely different chord, such as a descending 5th. I, i half dim, IVsus4, I. Change half step descent to whole step and you have vi V IV. And then you have a plagal half cadence, or you can resolve it with a IV I.

If you're in to classical theory, the biggest thing you need to get is tonic dominant relationship (I, V).
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#10
Quote by Eastwinn
bII - i and i - vi are common in metal. III - I is common in major metal. However, you can get away with just about any.


Oke, so would these just be power chords? Like in E minor would it be, F power chord, then E power chord for the first.

Sorry im not up there in theory, but if explained id really appreciate, like exatcly what chords and stuff, thanks!