#1
I got over a pretty busted Stratocaster Plus 1993 (for almost nothing), that has been through a very bad repair attempt. It kind of works and sounds ok, but i want to restore it to it's past glory. All parts are original and i think it deserves a better repair.

My first question is how to best repair the neck. See the attached pictures below.





I've been thinking of drilling out 10-15mm holes in the neck and fill/glue in hard round wood. Would that actually be strong enough? What wood should i use (what did Fender used originally?).

I have pretty much the same question for the trem post bushings (they actually appear solid, but it looks ugly):



Finally a picture of the head, if that could be of any use....



Any ideas are most welcome!

/Mike
#5
the damaged part of the neck appears to me as the part that's hidden in the neck pocket of the body? if thats the case and it isn't affecting playability you may aswell leave it.
as for the trem bushings, remove them and just refinish the surrounding wood.
then reinsert the bushings and off you go
#6
That heel is bad :/ if the screws are lose then it will affect it a lot.

Id drill out the holes and replace with metal bushings with bolts becuase that will happen again if you use dowel. wood screws can only cut a good thread once

you cant do much with the bad glue joint but they didnt even clean the crap off before it put back together :O


also the trem bushings look like the wood has split around them. do you know what the body is?
#7
Thanks for all replies, i already like this forum

@Bigsteve92: It's actually slightly visible as one of the cracks sticks out about 10mm beyond the body. However, the main reason i want to fox it is that the holes are not very tight for the 4 screws that holds it to the body (dead threads). I want the tight fit that's meant to be there. Any other sugestions than drilling out and filling with glued in wood? Regarding the body, how much would be sufficient to drill ot and replace with glued in wood? 10mm

@Levi79, innertom, guitarcam123: Sure i could, but i like it, and want to restore it. It has a personality that cries blues when i play it, so i just can't stand to replace the neck. Fretting and painting is easy and fun to do, and i do enjoy it! I will post on the progress, and hopefully get your sympathy
#8
Quote by Kramdra
That heel is bad :/ if the screws are lose then it will affect it a lot.

Id drill out the holes and replace with metal bushings with bolts becuase that will happen again if you use dowel. wood screws can only cut a good thread once

you cant do much with the bad glue joint but they didnt even clean the crap off before it put back together :O

also the trem bushings look like the wood has split around them. do you know what the body is?


Why would bolts/metal bushings be better than wood and wood screws?

I don't know what wood it is made of. I just stripped down the painty on the body, and it look similar to malple, but can't tell for sure. While stripping it down i noted something interesting: I found a total of 8 layers of paint.
1) On top a terrible greenish (on the pic above),
2) Black that almost started to float of the paint remover,
4) Blue metallic
5) White
6) Dark Red (maroonish)
7) Signal Red (metallic ?)
8) a clear basecoat that appears to be a 2 component clear coat, as the paint remover cound not disolve it. Could the 8th layer have been an original clear finnish, or part of a sunburst finnish?

it's a 1993 Stratocaster Plus.

Edit: forgot to mention some paint layers.
Last edited by swedishwings at Sep 13, 2009,
#9
if this were mine...

I'd go over to an industrial belt sander and sand off 90%(maybe 80% depending how deep the truss rod is) of the entire neck heel at an angle... being careful to make sure it ends up perfectly flat so it can receive a well selected piece of maple... then glue on that piece of maple using clamps and a counter wedge on top, then that industrial belt sander to flatten out the heel back to normal, then use a bottom bearing router bit to trim off the excess.

not sayin' plugging won't work, or metal bushings... just seems to me it's at the point where there's not much good wood left to work with and IMO you don't have much to loose.
Last edited by mistermikev at Sep 13, 2009,
#10
To be quite honest, at this point it looks like it may be starting to rot out inside. What I'd do would be to make a new neck. There's a tonne of good neck carving tutorials and stuff, and then the neck is totally yours.
R.I.P. Les Paul, 1915-2009

A man chooses, a slave obeys.
#11
first off, welcome to the forum, glad you like it!

second, im afraid brock's right. while metal bushings would hide the problem, the rot will continue.
so:

find the guy who let this happen, and punch him in the face.

now that that's over with, a new neck is in order. buy an american standard neck off ebay or make your own. (see tutorials in central hub)
Gibson SG Faded
Epi VJ Stack


Quote by Øttər
Whenever I clean my guitars, my family wonders why it smells so good; I say that I exude a fresh citrus scent from hidden orifices.
They stopped asking
#12
For the neck I wouldn't worry about it unless it won't bolt on good it's not causing a problem. If the repairs seem solid and it doesn't bolt on good I would drill out each of the holes 1/4'' and use maple dowels (same wood as the neck). Then put the neck in the pocket and drill holes a little bit smaller than the screws into the neck and screw it together. As far as the trem post bushings it looks like it just needs a little sanding maybe a little bit of woodfiller and some finishing to make it look good since you said they were solid.
#13
Quote by mistermikev
if this were mine...

I'd go over to an industrial belt sander and sand off 90%(maybe 80% depending how deep the truss rod is) of the entire neck heel at an angle... being careful to make sure it ends up perfectly flat so it can receive a well selected piece of maple... then glue on that piece of maple using clamps and a counter wedge on top, then that industrial belt sander to flatten out the heel back to normal, then use a bottom bearing router bit to trim off the excess.
Sorta the slow way round on that. Sanding is for leveling/smoothing. Not for removing massive amounts of material.

There do seem to be some problems deep in this neck heel. Probably more than 50% will have to go, to make this reasonably solid. But I'd probably do that in 2 strips that would be attached on either side of the trussrod and that disc. (I'm assuming that's part of a micro-tilt system?)

I'd be interested in hearing what David has to say about this one.


Also, bushings are a BAD idea, unless they have wood-threads on the outside as well as the machine-screw threads on the inside. Normal press-in bushings will be easily pulled out by the torque on the neck.
Meadows
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#14
^ a good industrial 12" belt (not a hand held belt sander a table belt sander with a 8' belt) w a 60 grit belt would make very short work of this... and the trick would be to 'ease' up to the point you wanted to stop... so that you didn't hit the truss rod.

you COULD cut it on a band saw... and then sand... but again... if you've ever sanded stuff on an industrial belt sander... it will go thru that wood like a hot knife thru butter - not that the average person would have access to that equip.
#15
Yeah, but then it'd burn the living **** out of the wood.
R.I.P. Les Paul, 1915-2009

A man chooses, a slave obeys.
#16
Quote by AngusJimiKeith
find the guy who let this happen, and punch him in the face.
He he, yes, but if i find him him he wont get away that easy, i'll (rightfully, as a true Darwinist) elminate him from the active genetic pool
Quote by mistermikev
if this were mine... I'd go over to an industrial belt sander and sand off 90%(maybe 80% depending how deep the truss rod is) of the entire neck heel at an angle...
That was actually the first idea that struk me, but I do not have access to anything like that. I choose to live in the Philippines, and they are like 50yrs behind here...
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Also, bushings are a BAD idea, unless they have wood-threads on the outside as well as the machine-screw threads on the inside. Normal press-in bushings will be easily pulled out by the torque on the neck.
You suggest dowels rather than bushings? Did i understand you correct?
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
But I'd probably do that in 2 strips that would be attached on either side of the trussrod and that disc. (I'm assuming that's part of a micro-tilt system?).
Yes it is.

You suggest that i'll make an diagonal cut (50%) from top/fretboard to the bottom/end of heal? That might be a good idea, but means i have to rip out the truss rod?

Guys, thanks for all input. This is forum is alive and kicking! Keep it kickin' folks!
#17
Quote by mistermikev
^ a good industrial 12" belt (not a hand held belt sander a table belt sander with a 8' belt) w a 60 grit belt would make very short work of this... it will go thru that wood like a hot knife thru butter ...
If i find one, the first thing that is going in that monster sander is the idiot who screwed up this guitar
#18
no, you shouldnt have to rip out the rod. the skunk stripe is directly over it, so just cut around the stripe and you should be good. dowels would also work, always remember: a properly done glue joint is stronger than the wood itself. use titebond original, if you can get it.


ALSO: remove him from the gene pool, and then submit it for a darwin award
Gibson SG Faded
Epi VJ Stack


Quote by Øttər
Whenever I clean my guitars, my family wonders why it smells so good; I say that I exude a fresh citrus scent from hidden orifices.
They stopped asking
#19
Quote by AngusJimiKeith
use titebond original, if you can get it.
Seriously doubt i'll find it. Would Elmers wood glue do?
Quote by AngusJimiKeith
ALSO: remove him from the gene pool, and then submit it for a darwin award
Done deal, we have a winner here.
Moral of the story: Don't annoy the people at ultlimate-guitar.com
#20
Quote by bv310
To be quite honest, at this point it looks like it may be starting to rot out inside. What I'd do would be to make a new neck. There's a tonne of good neck carving tutorials and stuff, and then the neck is totally yours.
Perhaps the pictures are misleading. The wood seems fine (after i sanded it down). The dark areas you see is a wood filler that was added. Other dark areas are residues from painting and patty. Also, the f*** who repaired it put on a slightly tinted clear coat, so everything lucks dark and dull. I'll post some more pictures if i can remember to bring the darn camera to the workshop tomorrow.
Last edited by swedishwings at Sep 13, 2009,
#21
Quote by bv310
Yeah, but then it'd burn the living **** out of the wood.


no, see they oscillate up and down to keep the belt cool and with an eight foot long belt no, ehem it'd be fine...

and even if it gets hot you COULD take it off for a min and put it back on...
assuming your r not a blithering idiot.


now I'm not saying this is the only way, or even the best possible way to do it, but it is A way and the way I would do it.
#22
Quote by swedishwings
If i find one, the first thing that is going in that monster sander is the idiot who screwed up this guitar


hehe... naw... toss him in the jenkins door profiler!
#23
jenkins door profiler? Did i miss something?
<yes, i'm swedish >
Last edited by swedishwings at Sep 13, 2009,
#24
Quote by swedishwings
jenkins door profiler? Did i miss something?
<yes, i'm swedish >


i dunno, used to work at a cab shop and we had this jenkins door profiler from the 80's and folks used to get their hands caught in it left and right... it has a bunch of routers inside so I figure it would mean a much more painful death than the sander... was just joking tho... sorry to derail.
#25
There is a way to fix this. It would take some major surgery, but it depends on what the neck is worth to you. Cut two block strips where the screw are about a 1/2" wide and replace the wood with a nice hard wood. If you create a nice tight fit on the blocks it should not effect the tone or playablity. You will then be able to screw into nice fresh wood.
#26
Quote by cSuttle
There is a way to fix this. It would take some major surgery, but it depends on what the neck is worth to you. Cut two block strips where the screw are about a 1/2" wide and replace the wood with a nice hard wood. If you create a nice tight fit on the blocks it should not effect the tone or playablity. You will then be able to screw into nice fresh wood.
Thanks for your reply!
That would be pretty much the same as using a dowel, no? Or is it some benefit using blocks that i don't get?
#27
Quote by mistermikev
i dunno, used to work at a cab shop and we had this jenkins door profiler from the 80's and folks used to get their hands caught in it left and right... it has a bunch of routers inside so I figure it would mean a much more painful death than the sander... was just joking tho... sorry to derail.
He he, hell, i box the guy and ship him to you for proper termination