#1
Searched so sory if this is a noob question.

I find myself getting stuck in boxes when I try to use theory, and my improving with it sounds (atleast to me) boring and repetitive, as I'm limiting myself to about 5 scales in any given key, without much room for say, slides, tapping, sweeps, etc. Not saying I want to write pure wankery a la cooley, but would be nice to be able to incorporate them.

tl;dr, how do I apply sweeping into my songs, and how do I get out of boxes?
#2
.....Arpeggios?
Gear
Highway One Tele (w/Custom Shop 51 Nocaster pickups)
Standard Tele (modded to Nashville specs)
Reverend Roundhouse

Orange Rockerverb 50 MKI
Vox AC4c1
Jet City JCA20H

And pedals!



"Shiva opens her arms now..
...to make sure I don't get too far"
#3
Quote by GordianKn0t
Searched so sory if this is a noob question.

I find myself getting stuck in boxes when I try to use theory, and my improving with it sounds (atleast to me) boring and repetitive, as I'm limiting myself to about 5 scales in any given key, without much room for say, slides, tapping, sweeps, etc. Not saying I want to write pure wankery a la cooley, but would be nice to be able to incorporate them.

tl;dr, how do I apply sweeping into my songs, and how do I get out of boxes?


keep playing.... get more experience..... learn more things...... apply those things

it takes time.
shred is gaudy music
#4
A scale is a collection of notes. Each note is found twice on each string (on a twenty four fret guitar). Therefore a scale can be found all over the fretboard. Thus, when playing you should be able to move anywhere on the fretboard and still have your scale. One good thing to do is practicing scales so that you play x number of notes on each string, before moving up to the next string. Try playing a scale with only one note on each string, and you'll have to challenge yourself, and you won't be using a box. Do two, three, four, five, six, and seven as well. You will eventually find patterns for each number, and will be able to combine the numbers. Then sliding and tapping should become easy once you know where a scale is over the entire fretboard, and won't rely on boxes. It will take a very long time, but eventually you will be able to play anything anywhere (range permitting).
#5
Don't learn box shapes.
learn all the notes on the fretboard and all the major scales and then go from there.
Don't Be Afraid and just look across Blue Fields.
You'll eventually see the Fisherman's Horizon.
#6
Quote by Novalydian
Don't learn box shapes.
learn all the notes on the fretboard and all the major scales and then go from there.


Why avoid learning something that's useful? Being able to visualize scales, chords, interval...ect on the neck only increases/reinforces your understanding of them. Not something to avoid learning IME.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by Novalydian
Don't learn box shapes.
learn all the notes on the fretboard and all the major scales and then go from there.

terrible advice. dont just avoid it all together. the guitar is set up the way it is in order to play a scale with as little movement as possible. thats what "shapes" are for. you should still know the notes and how to play all over the neck but dont just avoid using box shapes all together. the more ways you can play a scale on the guitar, the more options you have.

i doubt you can really avoid shapes anyway.
#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
A scale is a collection of notes. Each note is found twice on each string (on a twenty four fret guitar). Therefore a scale can be found all over the fretboard. Thus, when playing you should be able to move anywhere on the fretboard and still have your scale. One good thing to do is practicing scales so that you play x number of notes on each string, before moving up to the next string. Try playing a scale with only one note on each string, and you'll have to challenge yourself, and you won't be using a box. Do two, three, four, five, six, and seven as well. You will eventually find patterns for each number, and will be able to combine the numbers. Then sliding and tapping should become easy once you know where a scale is over the entire fretboard, and won't rely on boxes. It will take a very long time, but eventually you will be able to play anything anywhere (range permitting).


Thanks, makes quite a lot of sense. On top of this, what's the easiest way to learn the notes on the fretboard? I can't remember where it was, but there was some flash application I saw a while back, just gave a random fret/string, and you had to say what note it was. Anyone have a link?
#9
Don't let theory dictate what you play. Scales are just notes, and isn't music in themselves. Try improvising without the guitar, and instead sing and hum what you want to play. What's left to learn now, is to play the notes with your guitar instead of your voice.
Quote by thsrayas
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You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#10
Quote by GordianKn0t
Thanks, makes quite a lot of sense. On top of this, what's the easiest way to learn the notes on the fretboard? I can't remember where it was, but there was some flash application I saw a while back, just gave a random fret/string, and you had to say what note it was. Anyone have a link?


Different ways work better for different people. I'm not aware of this thing. I learned it through just thinking of what note I'm playing as I'm playing it, and learning about intervals.