#1
I read somewhere that amp wattage doesn't effect the amount of dB that the amp produces, which seems a little strange to me as i don't really understand what does affect volume.
Can anybody clear up if this is true or not and to what degree, and also what other factors affect the volume? thanks.
#2
Quote by tom_martin_123
I read somewhere that amp wattage doesn't effect the amount of dB that the amp produces, which seems a little strange to me as i don't really understand what does affect volume.
Can anybody clear up if this is true or not and to what degree, and also what other factors affect the volume? thanks.
It's not completely false, but not really true either. For example, a 40 watt tube amp is gonna be way louder than a 40 watt solid-state.

Also, a 40 watt amp through 4 x 10" cab is gonna sound a bit louder than through a 1 x 8" cab. That being said, more speakers does not equal "louder" but it does push more air, making it fill a room better, and overall just sound louder.
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#3
It's true.
A 100w tube amp produces only 3 db more than a 50w.
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#4
Quote by tom_martin_123
I read somewhere that amp wattage doesn't effect the amount of dB that the amp produces, which seems a little strange to me as i don't really understand what does affect volume.
Can anybody clear up if this is true or not and to what degree, and also what other factors affect the volume? thanks.
A more accurate way to think about it is that amp wattage does not necessarily give you a specific volume. Wattage is a measure of power, not loudness.

People like to say that a 50 watt tube amp will be 2x as loud as a 50 watt solid state amp, which is not necessarily true, a ton of things go into how loud an amp is and how loud we think they are, the taper of the volume, the way it's voiced, the efficiency of the speakers, etc. etc. In the end, a 40-45 watt Super Reverb is not a very loud amp at all, a Marshall 50 watt JMP will completely overpower it despite only being 5-10 more watts, and a 100 watt super lead will literally be like a freight train and make a 100 watt Fender sound tiny in comparison. my JTM45 is 30-40 watts and at 2 is about the volume of my solid state AVT50 at... idk, say 4 or so. However, by about 4 or 5 on the volume dial, my JTM45 never gets any louder, just more distorted, whereas I have a much more gradual increase in my AVT, they're roughly the same volume.

But what amp wattage typically refers to is the power it puts out before the onset of distortion, you can measure the peak output of an amp by looking at an oscilloscope trace and see that a lot of amps put out way more than their rated wattage, and this can differ amongst amps, an AC30 puts out ~35 watts running at it's peak output, but a Marshall 100 watt super lead can put out ~200 watts running dimed.
Last edited by al112987 at Sep 13, 2009,
#5
Quote by Sumlover41
It's true.
A 100w tube amp produces only 3 db more than a 50w.


Isn't it also true that something 10dB louder is actually 10 times louder or something like that.
#6
100w is twice as loud as 10w

sound loudness is weird that way
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#7
Quote by tom_martin_123
Isn't it also true that something 10dB louder is actually 10 times louder or something like that.


It depends. The decibel scale is logarithmic, not linear.
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#8
^ Indeed, physics = win . I belive the logarithmic scale for decibels also depends on the frequency??

TS, amp wattage does give an idea of how loud an amp will be. anything above 50w is pretty damn loud tbf. The number of speakers and size of the speakers in a cab will affect how you percieve the sound (larger speakers = better bass response (generally speaking), moves more air thus giving the impression that the amop is louder when it's really just transfering more energy into the air). The impedance of the speakers will also affect the loudness of the amp, for example a head driving a 4ohm cab will be louder than the same head driving a 8 ohm cab (with the same brand/model speakers) simply as there is less resistance in the circuitry (correct me if im wrong peeps ^^).
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#9
Quote by guitaristclass
^ Indeed, physics = win . I belive the logarithmic scale for decibels also depends on the frequency??

Yup, with the low and high frequencies being the hardest for humans to hear.

TS, read over the sticky, it answers this pretty much.
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