#1
So guys laltely ive been writing music for organ and so…
I am a composer in rock/blues genre and write classic music a lot too…
So I now am going to play on some organs well I think it’ll help me to get the feel of the instrument and inspire me even harder…
Hmm bt I got actually another idea of getting used to an organ (playing some time would do for me) and go and play in the church!
That’ll be nice and would sound really awesome

I actually play keyboards a lot, am not taught by a teacher, that means I don’t play in the traditional way… (I know the organ fingering is a bit different from the piano for example but I play in a weird way and I think I won’t have any problems), I aint fast and I don’t need it… plus the church music here is not really fast and doesn’t need sh!ttons of skills…

Ive played organ for a couple of times but it was about three years ago and I was just messing around, nothing much serious. So I need your help

The question is

How do you play the organ? How to turn it on, what’s the stop bar and so, why are all those pedals (not the pedal board keys) I know a bit about organs but I want to make sure

Thanx in advance
#2
Turning it on depends on the organ - out churches is ancient so we turn it on by a wall switch. I always find organ much harder than piano, there is much more to think about (you feet as well). Depending on quite how you play piano you will play organ differently, if you play piano chordally you shouldn't have too much problem, pick out chords - play roots with your feet. If you play classically (from sheet music rather than chords) you may have more of a challenge depending on the music you have. Since organ is a solo instrument most of the time you often have to go beyond the music to make it sound really "full" and learning to play chordally is almost invaluable (just adding 5ths here and there really makes a big difference).

The stops are used to change the sound of the organ - essentially the console itself is similar to a midi keyboard - the keys don't play the sound directly they push it to a pipe elsewhere on the instrument/in the church. Different stop push the sound to different pipes thus giving a different sound. You can also set different sounds for each "rack" of keys (called manuals). Depending on the organ you play you will be able to get different things. I've even seen one organ hooked up to a set of trumpets of different pitches so you can get a veritable brass orchestra going.

One thing to note is a total lack of dynamics - each note is either on or off - so in order to get dynamics you either need to pull stops while playing (which can be hard) or you need to make chords more/less full by missing/adding notes not in the sheet music.
#3
Quote by doive
One thing to note is a total lack of dynamics - each note is either on or off - so in order to get dynamics you either need to pull stops while playing (which can be hard) or you need to make chords more/less full by missing/adding notes not in the sheet music.


That would explain why the organ at my church is always so obnoxiously loud.
#4
Quote by isaac_bandits
That would explain why the organ at my church is always so obnoxiously loud.

Yes probably :p
It was also probably installed at a time where they expected a bigger congregation to absorb the sound. That or you have a bad organist who thinks to play organ you should play as many notes as your hands can physically press at all times. There are times for that, but there are also times you "SHOULD BLOODY WELL TURN IT DOWN". Having heard an organist get confused during "O little town of bethlehem" and play "how silently, how silently" full volume going all out on his chords i know how inappropriate organs can be :p
#5
so yeah, my basic knowledge was righthmm
One thing to note is a total lack of dynamics - each note is either on or off - so in order to get dynamics you either need to pull stops while playing (which can be hard) or you need to make chords more/less full by missing/adding notes not in the sheet music

that or just use the swell pedal eh??
hmm so why is the other pedal near the swell pedal?? (not only one) is it like the swell pedal for the second manual?


and i have heard some organs have a little pool full of water so when the wind gets into the pool, you get some bird twittering sound, or the thunder effect.. hmm well whatever

so to make i tmore interesting except of my main topic, tell your organ stories and share your knowledge
#6
Ooh yer - forgot about swell pedal - it's been a while since i played an organ :p The one i played didn't have another pedal next to it...? maybe you do have 2 swell pedals?

That's the wonderful thing about organs - no two are the same - most aren't even similar :p