#1
Okay, I'll admit I liked School of Rock back in the day, but it's getting ****ing annoying. It's been poking at me for awhile now, but his appearance at the VMA's tonight was the straw that broke the camel's back for me. It's a shame, because I thought he was very funny when he was just being a crazy down-on-his-luck scamp teaching 10-year-olds about music, or selling va-poo-rize. I mean... he was wearing fake muscles, a t-shirt advertising his new video game (which also capitalizes on his "br00talz" image), and prayed to Satan on stage. If he were really a Satanist, fine, but he's just doing that to fit the "metal" image.

Inb4 "lololol VMA's are for tools".
Inb4 "lololol Jack Black."
He's a freak of nature, but we love him so.

Quote by John Frusciante
Music isn't the Olympics. It's not about showing other people what you can do with a piece of wood in your hands that has strings on, it's about making sounds that are good.
#2
Tenacious D

And the Pick of Destiny


Both rule.
I will stand by all this drinking if it helps me through these days,
It takes a long time just to get this all straight.
#6
I'm sorry, I don't watch television. What is it that's bothering you, and what's the discussion you are presenting?
#7
irony
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i⋅ro⋅ny
1  /ˈaɪrəni, ˈaɪər-/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [ahy-ruh-nee, ahy-er-] Show IPA
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–noun, plural -nies.
1. the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning: the irony of her reply, “How nice!” when I said I had to work all weekend.
2. Literature.
a. a technique of indicating, as through character or plot development, an intention or attitude opposite to that which is actually or ostensibly stated.
b. (esp. in contemporary writing) a manner of organizing a work so as to give full expression to contradictory or complementary impulses, attitudes, etc., esp. as a means of indicating detachment from a subject, theme, or emotion.
3. Socratic irony.
4. dramatic irony.
5. an outcome of events contrary to what was, or might have been, expected.
6. the incongruity of this.
7. an objectively sardonic style of speech or writing.
8. an objectively or humorously sardonic utterance, disposition, quality, etc.
Origin:
1495–1505; < L īrōnīa < Gk eirōneía dissimulation, sarcasm, understatement, equiv. to eírōn a dissembler + -eia -y 3

Synonyms:
1, 2. Irony, sarcasm, satire indicate mockery of something or someone. The essential feature of irony is the indirect presentation of a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. In the figure of speech, emphasis is placed on the opposition between the literal and intended meaning of a statement; one thing is said and its opposite implied, as in the comment, “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” made when it is raining or nasty. Ironic literature exploits, in addition to the rhetorical figure, such devices as character development, situation, and plot to stress the paradoxical nature of reality or the contrast between an ideal and actual condition, set of circumstances, etc., frequently in such a way as to stress the absurdity present in the contradiction between substance and form. Irony differs from sarcasm in greater subtlety and wit. In sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!” or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants.” The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal inflection, whereas satire and irony, arising originally as literary and rhetorical forms, are exhibited in the organization or structuring of either language or literary material. Satire usually implies the use of irony or sarcasm for censorious or critical purposes and is often directed at public figures or institutions, conventional behavior, political situations, etc.
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i⋅ron⋅y
2  /ˈaɪərni/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [ahy-er-nee] Show IPA
–adjective
consisting of, containing, or resembling iron.
Origin:
1350–1400; ME; see iron, -y 1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2009.
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i·ro·ny (ī'rə-nē, ī'ər-)
n. pl. i·ro·nies

1.
1. The use of words to express something different from and often opposite to their literal meaning.
2. An expression or utterance marked by a deliberate contrast between apparent and intended meaning.
3. A literary style employing such contrasts for humorous or rhetorical effect. See Synonyms at wit1.
4. Incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs: "Hyde noted the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated" (Richard Kain).
5. An occurrence, result, or circumstance notable for such incongruity. See Usage Note at ironic.
2.
1. Incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs: "Hyde noted the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated" (Richard Kain).
2. An occurrence, result, or circumstance notable for such incongruity. See Usage Note at ironic.
3. Dramatic irony.
4. Socratic irony.


[French ironie, from Old French, from Latin īrōnīa, from Greek eirōneia, feigned ignorance, from eirōn, dissembler, probably from eirein, to say; see wer-5 in Indo-European roots.]
The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2009 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Unscramble a synonym of irony
Cultural Dictionary

irony

The use of words to mean something very different from what they appear on the surface to mean. Jonathan Swift uses irony in “A Modest Proposal” when he suggests the eating of babies as a solution to overpopulation and starvation in Ireland.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Word Origin & History

irony
1502, from L. ironia, from Gk. eironeia, from eiron "dissembler," perhaps related to eirein "to speak" (see verb). Used in Gk. of affected ignorance, especially that of Socrates. For nuances of usage, see humor.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2001 Douglas Harper
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