#1
so for the years that i have been playing, i have just been practicing my techniques, and now ive got them down and perfect its time for me to learn some theory


so i was thinking of getting down chords and keys

so if you could be helpful enough to tell me every chord that is in every different key

e.g.

key of C major : C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, and i believe a B?

etc etc etc


would be very helpful and much appreciated
#3
chord construction time!
a basic chord is made up or a root a 3rd and a 5th

take your major scale C D E F G A B
now pick your root note. (let's choose D)
so we want a D chord in C but is it major or minor?!?!
to find the 3rd count along to the 3rd note after D in the scale (D - E -F)
Now count how many semitones are between the root and the third? if it's 3 = minor if it's 4= major. D-F = 3 semitones => it's minor.
now check the 5th. Count 5 notes from root - D E F G A. Now count the semitones again - if it's 7 it's a perfect 5th (normal one) 6 semis=diminished - 8 semis = augmented (rare). D-A is 7 so it's a perfect 5th (since that's normal no need to write it down
so your chord is Dm

Repeat this for each note in the scale and see what you find (the pattern you wrote is right but now you know why) What could the B be? [hint: it's not major or minor]

To move it to a different key is easy - you just need to know the notes in the scale. e.g. A major = A B C# D E F# G# A. To work that out, just play the same patterns of intervals as you would for C major, but starting in a different place. You should find the pattern of maj min min maj maj min dim is the same for any note you choose to start on.

simple really
#4
Quote by doive
chord construction time!
a basic chord is made up or a root a 3rd and a 5th

take your major scale C D E F G A B
now pick your root note. (let's choose D)
so we want a D chord in C but is it major or minor?!?!
to find the 3rd count along to the 3rd note after D in the scale (D - E -F)
Now count how many semitones are between the root and the third? if it's 3 = minor if it's 4= major. D-F = 3 semitones => it's minor.
now check the 5th. Count 5 notes from root - D E F G A. Now count the semitones again - if it's 7 it's a perfect 5th (normal one) 6 semis=diminished - 8 semis = augmented (rare). D-A is 7 so it's a perfect 5th (since that's normal no need to write it down
so your chord is Dm

Repeat this for each note in the scale and see what you find (the pattern you wrote is right but now you know why) What could the B be? [hint: it's not major or minor]

To move it to a different key is easy - you just need to know the notes in the scale. e.g. A major = A B C# D E F# G# A. To work that out, just play the same patterns of intervals as you would for C major, but starting in a different place. You should find the pattern of maj min min maj maj min dim is the same for any note you choose to start on.

simple really


This.
#5
The first thing you need to know are scales. Relationship for a major scale in range of steps is WWHWWWH W being whole step and H being half step.

In natural minor, you use the same relationship and start on vi (which is the relative minor of said key): WHWWHWWW

In a major key the chords are:
I ii iii IV V vi viio
where I is tonic, V is dominant. Capital letters are major, lower case are minor, lower case with an o at the end (Really is supposed to be a superscript) is diminished and + at the end of a capital is augmented.

In Natural minor the chords are:
i iio III iv v VI VII

In Harmonic minor (Most common in 18th century music), you raise the seventh note in the minor scale. The seventh is known as the leading tone because it leads into the tonic. The leading tone of a key is the major third of the tonic's dominant and is one half step below the tonic. i.e. leading tone of CM is B natural, the major third of G, C's dominant or V/C.
Raising the seventh changes chords in the key:
i ii III+ iv V VI viio

I posted and explained melodic minor on the melodic minor thread. go find it if you want to know
I am the only sane person on the planet. Does that make me crazy?

Crank the Mids
#7
Quote:
Originally Posted by doive
chord construction time!
a basic chord is made up or a root a 3rd and a 5th

take your major scale C D E F G A B
now pick your root note. (let's choose D)
so we want a D chord in C but is it major or minor?!?!
to find the 3rd count along to the 3rd note after D in the scale (D - E -F)
Now count how many semitones are between the root and the third? if it's 3 = minor if it's 4= major. D-F = 3 semitones => it's minor.
now check the 5th. Count 5 notes from root - D E F G A. Now count the semitones again - if it's 7 it's a perfect 5th (normal one) 6 semis=diminished - 8 semis = augmented (rare). D-A is 7 so it's a perfect 5th (since that's normal no need to write it down
so your chord is Dm

Repeat this for each note in the scale and see what you find (the pattern you wrote is right but now you know why) What could the B be? [hint: it's not major or minor]

To move it to a different key is easy - you just need to know the notes in the scale. e.g. A major = A B C# D E F# G# A. To work that out, just play the same patterns of intervals as you would for C major, but starting in a different place. You should find the pattern of maj min min maj maj min dim is the same for any note you choose to start on.

simple really


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#8
Quote by Myshadow46_2
I would argue that understanding intervals is a better place to start, then scale construction and chord construction will make more sense.

True - i was kinda making the assumption he knew what a major scale was/vaguely how it was constructed since he got pretty far in working out the chords relative to C
#9
Quote by Myshadow46_2
I would argue that understanding intervals is a better place to start, then scale construction and chord construction will make more sense.


Your right. I did not explain intervals. I figured that they were simple enough for someone who had been playing an instrument for a while to understand. But I should have stated that.
I am the only sane person on the planet. Does that make me crazy?

Crank the Mids
#10
Quote by doive
chord construction time!
a basic chord is made up or a root a 3rd and a 5th

take your major scale C D E F G A B
now pick your root note. (let's choose D)
so we want a D chord in C but is it major or minor?!?!
to find the 3rd count along to the 3rd note after D in the scale (D - E -F)
Now count how many semitones are between the root and the third? if it's 3 = minor if it's 4= major. D-F = 3 semitones => it's minor.
now check the 5th. Count 5 notes from root - D E F G A. Now count the semitones again - if it's 7 it's a perfect 5th (normal one) 6 semis=diminished - 8 semis = augmented (rare). D-A is 7 so it's a perfect 5th (since that's normal no need to write it down
so your chord is Dm

Repeat this for each note in the scale and see what you find (the pattern you wrote is right but now you know why) What could the B be? [hint: it's not major or minor]

To move it to a different key is easy - you just need to know the notes in the scale. e.g. A major = A B C# D E F# G# A. To work that out, just play the same patterns of intervals as you would for C major, but starting in a different place. You should find the pattern of maj min min maj maj min dim is the same for any note you choose to start on.

simple really



thank you very much
#11
Quote by Myshadow46_2
I would argue that understanding intervals is a better place to start, then scale construction and chord construction will make more sense.

I disagree. I find intervals get their name from the major scale so understanding the major scale is the best way to understand basic intervals.

Without reference to the major scale can you explain why is a perfect fourth a perfect fourth and not a sixth? It is the sixth note along in our 12 pitch classes.

Perhaps you say it has to do with letters. But that begs the question as to why there are only seven letters. The answer lies in understanding the major scale.

The major scale provides the most basic frame of reference for nearly all concepts in western music theory. - But then maybe that's just me.
Si
#12
I just realized that I explained intervals in my long-winded speech.. and it's not just understanding the major scale because that's not incredibly difficult. Minor keys are much harder to understand. And we are talking about western music theory here. So whether or not there is a certain number of notes in a scale is irrelevant. (to 20tigers) you probably learned scales, then intervals so it would make sense that intervals fit into your understanding of scales. In theory, they teach intervals first, and say that scales are formations among intervals. If you learn scales first, you have to learn every scale within reference of what you are playing to understand the intervals in them. If you learn intervals first, then you can form any scale that fits into the 12 note chromatic scale.
I am the only sane person on the planet. Does that make me crazy?

Crank the Mids
#13
I wasn't taught and never had a teacher. So I don't know what they teach first.

I just find teaching the major scale before intervals is much more useful. Of course I have to teach them about octaves and how there are 12 musical pitches and each is separated by a semitone and two semitones is a whole tone and how pitches have more than one name.

Invariably the questions come - why are there seven letters why are they sharp and flat why is there no B# etc etc

I just find it easier to answer all their questions in reference to the major scale. So I teach them the major scale in C and how it is made up of seven unique pitches and how each one is a different interval and how we can raise and lower them to get other intervals and how some intervals can have different names depending on how we got there.

I honestly find that with the major scale as a concrete base they get this stuff much quicker than when it is more abstract.

It does of course depend entirely on the student though.

EDIT: Oh and if you learn the major scale then all other scales and modes can simply be viewed and understood as variations on that. Similarly I view intervals as simply derived from the major scale.

I should say though that those other scales and modes would come after intervals. But the major scale is one of the first things - before scales. If a student is with me for just one lesson the one piece of theory I'd want them to walk away with is the major scale.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 14, 2009,
#14
Quote by 20Tigers
I disagree. I find intervals get their name from the major scale so understanding the major scale is the best way to understand basic intervals.

Without reference to the major scale can you explain why is a perfect fourth a perfect fourth and not a sixth? It is the sixth note along in our 12 pitch classes.

Perhaps you say it has to do with letters. But that begs the question as to why there are only seven letters. The answer lies in understanding the major scale.

The major scale provides the most basic frame of reference for nearly all concepts in western music theory. - But then maybe that's just me.


Either way, one will clarify another. They are important to learn together, whichever order you decide.
#15
Quote by doive

Repeat this for each note in the scale and see what you find (the pattern you wrote is right but now you know why) What could the B be? [hint: it's not major or minor


I want to see if I got this down. Is it a diminished?
#16
Quote by shredda2084


so if you could be helpful enough to tell me every chord that is in every different key



Heres the chords at the triad level for Major and minor keys

Major and minor scales harmonized

It'll give you something to reference.
shred is gaudy music
#17
^^yep predster - you're dead right it's a diminished triad! well done, people can take literally months to understand this...
#18
yaaay!!! =)

EDIT-I should thank everyone here so THANKS!
Last edited by Thepredster at Sep 14, 2009,