#1
This is quite a common technique in jazz/blues piano. Where you play a double stop but one of the notes is run.
anyone know of any guitarists in jazz or other genres who use this technique much? (i don't mean sliding a double stop i mean proper acci's which take up no beats in the bar)
There must be some, but i don't know where to start looking for them :s
#2
Quote by doive
This is quite a common technique in jazz/blues piano. Where you play a double stop but one of the notes is run.
anyone know of any guitarists in jazz or other genres who use this technique much? (i don't mean sliding a double stop i mean proper acci's which take up no beats in the bar)
There must be some, but i don't know where to start looking for them :s



you mean like this sort of thing?......



---------------------------------
------------------8--------------
-----7------------7--(h)9-------
-----7-(h)9---------------------
---------------------------------
----------------------------------



Lot's of guitarists.....

That I can think of off hand..

Hendrix
Steve Howe
SRV

you, if you choose

I do it often.

Very common device, though the term "Acciaccatura double stop" is probably known/used by a very small minority if any. (I've never actually heard it used to be honest though it does seem to describe what's happening)
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 14, 2009,
#3
that's pretty much what i was thinking of, but when i see hendrix etc. doing it it seems to have a subtly different feel to how i know it on piano.
It's more like the quick note comes before the beat, the way hendrix i see tend to play is the quick note on the beat then the held note slightly after rather than the other way about, it also pulls the double stopped note slightly out the front of the bar. Maybe i'm just playing them wrong :p
EDIT: this is what i mean http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r99B9plGyiE i've have never heard "quite" that sound on a guitar
EDIT2: i lied totally - i just listened to wind cries mary and heard it every which way and where - not entirely sure what i was thinking was different :s
Last edited by doive at Sep 14, 2009,
#4
Quote by doive
that's pretty much what i was thinking of, but when i see hendrix etc. doing it it seems to have a subtly different feel to how i know it on piano.
It's more like the quick note comes before the beat, the way hendrix i see tend to play is the quick note on the beat then the held note slightly after rather than the other way about, it also pulls the double stopped note slightly out the front of the bar. Maybe i'm just playing them wrong :p
EDIT: this is what i mean http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r99B9plGyiE i've have never heard "quite" that sound on a guitar
EDIT2: i lied totally - i just listened to wind cries mary and heard it every which way and where - not entirely sure what i was thinking was different :s



Well it is a different instrument. And different players/styles

either way, you could always just mimic what your hearing..... transfer/work it out on guitar.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 14, 2009,
#5
Are you talking about the difference between an appoggiatura and an acciaccatura?
#6
yes in a way. But i was initially only interested in finding guitar parts that used acci's over poggi's i've found the latter more commonly on guitars (when combined with notes on other strings) while the former is more common on pianos
#7
I could be way off, but do you mean like in the way Paranoid by Black Sabbath, where there is a double stop and the guitarist hammers it to a power chord in the intro?
#8
no i don't really - that has too long a pause between the note and hammer-on
listen to the youtube link i posted. When i play it on piano it works because i can play the acci and note in a single finger stroke often.