#1
So modes all have to do with a different root note. But what makes that note the root note? How do you know that it is?
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#3
c'mon. It's not as easy as that it's the first note of a song
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#4
the root note is the note that the whole scale/mode/chord is built around
ex. in C#minor chord C# is the root note, in a G Major scale G is the root note, in a A lidian mode A is the root note
get the idea?
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Last edited by justinb904 at Sep 15, 2009,
#5
Oh wait, you possibly don't understand my question. When someone is playing a solo and he says: this is E lydian. How do you know that the root note he is playing is E?
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Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#6
Quote by 08L1V10N
Oh wait, you possibly don't understand my question. When someone is playing a solo and he says: this is E lydian. How do you know that the root note he is playing is E?

otherwise it wouldn't be called "E" lydian
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#7
Its the note it feels like it wants to end on - the note it feels 'finished' on.

If I'm trying to work out the root of a song I mess around til I find a note/chord that sounds ok over the whole thing. Probably not the most efficient way of doing it but it works for me
#8
Yes, but what makes the E he is playing the root note?
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#9
the root note and it's third/fifth get played more often, a passage sounds resolved when you get to the root note

amirite?

to get a feel for it you could use a bassline that's all E and fool around with E lydian
Last edited by malephik at Sep 15, 2009,
#10
Quote by 08L1V10N
Yes, but what makes the E he is playing the root note?

it is the "tonic", basically the rest of the mode is determined by a set pattern of intervals starting at this root/tonic
it is essentially the foundation of the mode

either i'm not getting your question or you're not understanding the explanation because i feel like we're going in circles

if you still don't get it, try checking out the lessons on basic scale construction, this should have a decent description of the importance of the root note in scales/modes
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Last edited by justinb904 at Sep 15, 2009,
#11
lawl you guys. What the HELL does "oh it just sounds like it" mean?

To determine the root, it depends based on the genre of music you're listening to as well as some other things. Lets take for instance Lydian. First of all, this mode is a major mode, so it better sound bright and not-minor-ish. The major modes are Ionian, Lydian and Mixolydian...where the minor modes are Dorian, Phrygian, and Aeolian. Oh and, no matter what, there's gotta be some V to I movement somewhere (GENRE SPECIFIC! OBVIOUSLY IF WE'RE DOING SOME MODAL CRAP THIS WONT HAPPEN. DONT YELL AT ME IF YOU'RE SO STUPID THAT YOU HAVE TO ARGUE). That being said, you should hear a non-Dominant major chord going down a fifth to a Maj7#11 chord. Chord progressions and extensions are the way to figure out the key-- NOT THE FIRST OR LAST FREAKING NOTE! YOU TELL THAT TO SCHOENBERG, OR SHORTER, OR EVANS, OR WEBERN! Lydian is known for the sharp 4, so that "brightness/clarity" should be exhumed from the listening. Generally, Lydian actually sounds almost more consonant than Ionian (that #4 voices up to the 5 wayyyy better than a normal P4).

So whenever you hear a tune, first identify if it's a major sounding piece or a minor sounding piece. After that, you're pretty much done for if you don't transcribe. Because there's more modes than just those normal 7. You can have all the modes of harmonic minor. You can have all the modes of melodic minor. You can have synthetic modes that take on some major or minor attributes because of their 3rds and 7ths being major or minor. There's too much out there.

Dorian is known for being the "happiest" of the minor keys. It's got a raised 6th that brightens it up.

Phrygian should sound spanishy generally. That lowered 2nd really does it.

Lydian is that #4.

Mixolydian should sound evanescent and floaty in feel because of that dom 7th.

Locrian is the darkest in feel. It just sounds "out there" in comparison to the others. Lowered 2nd, lowered 3rd, lowered 5th, lowered 6th, and lowered 7th.
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#12
Actually the 'root' note of a scale is called the tonic. The term root is only used in a harmonic context.


Phrygian should sound spanishy generally. That lowered 2nd really does it.

I don't really think you can associate mode with certain sounds in that way. There are too many other factors involved. Take the song 'Tubular Bells' by Mike Oldfield. While it's in phryigan it doesn't sound spanish at all, more like creepy or scary.
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#13
^this is true.

And it is all to do with how it sounds.

It's like playing something in C major and something in Am. Surely you can tell whether it's in C major or Am. The way you do that is by listening to it. It really is the only way. There are other things that might give you clues or narrow down your options but ultimately you need to listen in order to determine the tonal centre. What note is it that all the other notes are heard in relation to? What note sounds like home?

Then you look at the intervals in relation to that note and figure out what mode you're is being played.
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