#1
Simply what is the scale of a guitar i see it loads now on guitar sites and read an article where paul gilbert choses the gague string he uses depending on the guitar scale.
#2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_scale

/thread


edit: also, google was incredibly fast in finding it for me. it required more effort in you making this thread than if you had googled it
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Last edited by GODhimself37 at Sep 15, 2009,
#3
Quote by GODhimself37
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musical_scale

/thread


edit: also, google was incredibly fast in finding it for me. it required more effort in you making this thread than if you had googled it


Wrong scale sir, at least get your answer right before you get snippy

I'd safely assume if Paul Gilbert was referring to Scale LENGTH, which is the length between the nut and the bridge on a guitar, which affects string tautness as well as tone and bending
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#4
I don't think he is referring to the musical scales so much as the scale length of a guitar. Here is the definition of a guitar's scale length and why Paul Gilbert takes this into consideration when choosing string guages:

A guitar's scale length is the distance between the bone nut or zero fret and the bridge's saddle. This measurement not only determines the placement of the frets for proper intonation, but has a profound effect on string tension, tone, and in some cases, tuning stability.

The physics is fairly easy to grasp. If two guitars of different scale lengths (i.e. Fender and Gibson guitars) are strung with equal gauge strings and tuned to normal concert pitch, the shorter scale Gibson will have less tension , resulting in a "looser" feel. You can prove this to yourself by capoing any guitar at the first fret (effectively shorting the scale length) and then retuning down to concert pitch. The strings will now be under less tension, making them easier to bend and vibrato. You may also notice that the instrument now has more "buzzing" and "fret rattle" when played, because of the increased vibrating amplitude of the looser strings.

While some electric guitarists use a shorter scale instrument to achieve less string tension and easier playability, others see it as an opportunity to get a "thicker" tone utilizing heavier gauge strings. For instance, take two identical electric guitar bodies, one fitted with a 25 1/2", and the other with a 24 3/4" scale neck. If you find your technique requires using .009 - .042 gauge strings on the longscale, you'll probably get the same feel utilizing a heavier .010 - .046 gauge on the short scale instrument, The heavier gauge strings will also have the side-effect of inducing more voltage in your pickups, resulting in a "thicker" fundamental note, and more output.

Hope this answers your question.
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#5
Quote by Dopey_Trout
Wrong scale sir, at least get your answer right before you get snippy

I'd safely assume if Paul Gilbert was referring to Scale LENGTH, which is the length between the nut and the bridge on a guitar, which affects string tautness as well as tone and bending



I googled guitar scale length too, and was planning on posting that as an alternative if i was wrong. but then i was like, "why do i care? someone if gonna post before i finish the edit anyways"

Oh how right i was.
If a mortal stands before us
Strike him down with sleight of hand.
And if heaven rides against us
Then God himself must be damned.


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#6
+1 to KillRoy
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#7
Quote by GODhimself37
I googled guitar scale length too, and was planning on posting that as an alternative if i was wrong. but then i was like, "why do i care? someone if gonna post before i finish the edit anyways"

Oh how right i was.


Thanks bud. No-one believes you though.

+1 Killroy and Trout.

Scale length is important if you are -- like I am -- very interested in having your strings at a specific tension at all times, regardless of tuning. I hate floppy strings. Perfect tension is 10-46 in standard on 25.5" scale. Scale length is integral in determining what gauge will yield the ideal tension.
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#9
Quote by Sarcophagist
Thanks bud. No-one believes you though.

+1 Killroy and Trout.

Scale length is important if you are -- like I am -- very interested in having your strings at a specific tension at all times, regardless of tuning. I hate floppy strings. Perfect tension is 10-46 in standard on 25.5" scale. Scale length is integral in determining what gauge will yield the ideal tension.



I think i would know a little bit more than a september 09er. especially since i've been playing alot longer than i have been on this site. as well as the fact that i have about 4 guitars now and i have worked and learned about every single one. so STFU and GTFO
If a mortal stands before us
Strike him down with sleight of hand.
And if heaven rides against us
Then God himself must be damned.


Computer Science major! Apple enthusiast!
I wear Vibrams and type with Dvorak!
#10
Quote by GODhimself37
I think i would know a little bit more than a september 09er. especially since i've been playing alot longer than i have been on this site. as well as the fact that i have about 4 guitars now and i have worked and learned about every single one. so STFU and GTFO


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#11
just read the first post before you reply. it'll save you from having to pretend you meant to post something completely irrelevant.

anyway, i always choose my string gauge depending on the scale. my floyd rose equipped guitar has 9 gauge stings on it because it's always in standard tuning. my gibson has 10's or 11's on it, depending on how i feel when i change the strings and whether or not i want to tune down a half step or so.

basically, i do it like this:

25.5" scale = 9 to 11 gauge
24.75" scale = 10 to 12 gauge.

it's all personal preference, but thats how i restring mine. 9's are too floppy on a shorter scale, and 12s are just too big to be comfortable on a larger one.

EDIT: and you might already know this since you're asking, but just for kicks and giggles... to measure your guitars scale length just measure from the nut to the 12th fret, then double it. thats your scale length in inches. the difference between a 25.5" and a 24.75" can see insanely small at first, but they can make a huge difference
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Last edited by LifeIsABullet16 at Sep 15, 2009,
#12
I don't think it really matters in terms of tension really since you can compensate for that by using different gauge strings. But the different strings affect tone depending on the scale length. It greatly affects playability though. That's the most important factor for me. Anything shorter than 25.5" will feel extremely cramped on the higher frets for me. That's why I refuse to get an Eclipse even though it's one of my favorite guitars. Longer scale lengths also have more clarity and a brighter, snappier attack.
#14
Quote by GODhimself37
I think i would know a little bit more than a september 09er. especially since i've been playing alot longer than i have been on this site. as well as the fact that i have about 4 guitars now and i have worked and learned about every single one. so STFU and GTFO


Didn't occur to you that this guy might be a 70 year old blues master with a huge collection of vintage guitars and a record deal then?

You judge on join date so your opinion is almost invalid.
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