#1
Okay I'm in a pop punk band. We've got 2 guitars, bass, drums, and 3 vocals (1 lead, 2 background).


I am completely new to recording, all I have is a desktop Windows Vista computer. What are all the things I would need to be able to record my band at home at an affordable price with good sound quality?

My budget is about $800, but if I NEED more, I can probably scrape it up.


Thank you
#2
you will need an interface.
http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/PreSonus-FP10-10x10-FireWire-Interface?sku=242036 (if you've got a firewire port)

a large diaphragm condenser for vocals

bass goes straight in unless you want to try micing it too.

something along these lines for drums
http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Shure-PG-6Piece-Drum-Microphone-Package?sku=270298

and pick up 1 sm57 for guitar cabs and snare.

you can use that kick mic for a bass cab too

that will run you over 800, i'm sure you can get similar things for cheaper, and that's also not factoring in all the mic cables, stands, and pop filters you would need. that's just a basic idea to help you in your hunting.
#3
Check Tweak's Guide.
If you want to track everything live in one take you will need a lot of mics and a large firewire interface.
Normally you can track each instrument one at a time and use a small interface however when tracking acoustic drums you should really use at least 4 mics and so you would want a larger audio interface that wont mix down.

I suggest buying the PreSonus FP10 interface and get a few mics for the drums and amps. A few SM57 mics are good for guitar cabs as well as drums, get yourself two small diaphragm condensers for overheads on the drums to capture the cymbals.
Last edited by moody07747 at Sep 16, 2009,
#4
Recording isnt necessarily always about what people tell you is best, a lot of it is trial and error to find out your 'own' sound.

Granted its pretty universal that an SM57 does really work with Guiitar amps and does really bring out the punch of a snare.

But ive had some really great results with a simple kick drum, SM57 over the snare and an SM58 for overheads for a dirty minimal sound so in terms of mics and things id reccomend getting the essentials (ie. SM57, kick drum, 58 and maybe another 57) and then seeing if you can borrow other mics to see if you lie the sound.

On that note though Id really reccomend the Rode NT 5s if you want to get a really nice sounding small D condensers.
#5
You can afford to skimp on tom mics - and I've actually had some REALLY REALLY REALLY good results using no-brand d606's which cost around £20 or $30 each on ebay. Seriously, I'd use them over sennheiser e604's any day. You can then use the money you saved to get a decent kick drum mic like an AKG d112, some better overheads (rode nt 5s are my overheads of choice) and a couple of 57's, which you can then use for guitar cabs/snare. You should be able to get away with using one of the nt 5s for vocals as well. It won't sound quite as good as a large diaphragm condenser, but it would be good enough.
Quote by griffRG7321
become a circumsizer, you get like £60,000 a year + tips.

Quote by Flying Couch
Because I'm not aerodynamic. All the other airborne furniture laugh at me.

LIKE PORTISHEAD?
#6
m-audio profire
AKG drum mic kit
rode NT5
Sm 58
Sm 57
Nuendo 4
If you want to get laid, go to college,
If you want education go to a library

-Frank Zappa-
#8
Question one: does any of the band have recording experience, and if not does anyone have the time and patience to spend at least few months learning how to mix properly?

If not, you might as well roll up your $800 and smoke it.
No matter how much you spend on gear, you need to put in the time learning how to engineer and mix, or you'll get crap results. And even if you do you'll still only get low-quality demos; it can take years to learn to produce great-sounding mixes.


$800 will get you enough studio time to record an entire album at professional quality, so unless at least one of you is serious about learn to mix, you're going to get much, much better results paying to go to a pro studio.
#9
Quote by kyle62
Question one: does any of the band have recording experience, and if not does anyone have the time and patience to spend at least few months learning how to mix properly?

If not, you might as well roll up your $800 and smoke it.
No matter how much you spend on gear, you need to put in the time learning how to engineer and mix, or you'll get crap results. And even if you do you'll still only get low-quality demos; it can take years to learn to produce great-sounding mixes.


$800 will get you enough studio time to record an entire album at professional quality, so unless at least one of you is serious about learn to mix, you're going to get much, much better results paying to go to a pro studio.


Not really, that's 5-12 hours at a good studio, you could get a pretty good sounding EP maybe, but not a full album, unless you record live, even then you would have to pay another few hundred bucks for a mixdown and whatnot.

I agree with the rest of what you're saying though.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#10
Quote by kyle62
Question one: does any of the band have recording experience, and if not does anyone have the time and patience to spend at least few months learning how to mix properly?

If not, you might as well roll up your $800 and smoke it.
No matter how much you spend on gear, you need to put in the time learning how to engineer and mix, or you'll get crap results. And even if you do you'll still only get low-quality demos; it can take years to learn to produce great-sounding mixes.


$800 will get you enough studio time to record an entire album at professional quality, so unless at least one of you is serious about learn to mix, you're going to get much, much better results paying to go to a pro studio.

roll up the 800$ and smoke it got me. anyways he has a very valid point, it will take time to get good recordings, but a huge advantage of a home studio i believe is that theirs no rushing and if you make your home studio right you want have to go to a studio in the future.
#11
Wow, thank you all for the advice, seriously much more than I expected, I really appreciate it


And to answer 'question one,' no, none of us have any recording experience. On that note though, I've been wanting to learn for quite some time and I am prepared to put in the work to learn how, I think it'll be time well-spent in the long run.


But yeah, thank you all very much. This has given me a lot to work with. If anyone else has any more advice they'd like to offer, I'd love to hear it
#12
Quote by Another bassist

And to answer 'question one,' no, none of us have any recording experience. On that note though, I've been wanting to learn for quite some time and I am prepared to put in the work to learn how, I think it'll be time well-spent in the long run.

In that case, I wholeheartedly recommend going down the home-recording route