#1
im using a strat thats connected to a line 6 podx live multi effect thats connected to the PA. i run straight to the pa with no amp. it sounds really good and all. but once the rest of the band starts playing, i can barely hear my guitar. for your info, we have 4mics, acoutic guitar, bass, piano connected to the same PA. my question is, why cant i hear my guitar once the rest of the band play? i mean when its just me playing i can hear it clearly and loud. what's the cost of this? and how do i solve this? its very weird because i can hear the other instrument clearly, its just my guitar that i can barely hear
#2
did you try making your channel on the mixer higher
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#5
you might need a monitor? just a thought...
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#7
Quote by initialxig
im using a strat thats connected to a line 6 podx live multi effect thats connected to the PA. i run straight to the pa with no amp. it sounds really good and all. but once the rest of the band starts playing, i can barely hear my guitar. for your info, we have 4mics, acoutic guitar, bass, piano connected to the same PA. my question is, why cant i hear my guitar once the rest of the band play? i mean when its just me playing i can hear it clearly and loud. what's the cost of this? and how do i solve this? its very weird because i can hear the other instrument clearly, its just my guitar that i can barely hear


Hmmm sounds like you need.... some sort of.... amplification?


Just messing with you, I would make sure you turn yourself up on the mixer and turn everyone else down of you need to then turn the master volume up.
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#8
That depends on whether your tone is having trouble cutting thru the mix or you are having monitoring problems. Just get a friend to stand in the audience section during sound check and tell him to yell out whether or not the guitar is cutting thru nice enough. If that sounds fine, then I suggest getting a cheap amp and stick in front of ur pedalboard facing you, and use a clean-ish tone on it. Clean tones imo serve better as a monitor.
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Last edited by MonsterOfRock at Sep 16, 2009,
#9
The question is whether you are talking about stage volume or actual PA volume. If you don't have a monitor, you're not going to hear much of yourself at all. If you do have a monitor you need to turn yourself up in it, OR turn everyone else down in it. If you're talking about PA volume, first of all the only way you can tell is to stand out in the audience area, if you're standing behind the speakers you can't tell what it actually sounds like.
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#10
Here's a solution. Buy an amplifier. That is not LINE 6.
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#11
Quote by Bluesy...
Here's a solution. Buy an amplifier. That is not LINE 6.


And what exactly is wrong with Line 6? They make great amps.
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#13
im standing next to the left speaker thats facing the audience. and yes we have a small monitor but its all the way to the right side of me. the monitor that we have is just for the vocals. and yes i've heard it while standing in the audience side. when we practice i always play to where the audience will be sitting at. and still i can barely hear my self when everyone plays, like my guitar sounds all blurry or something. haha. does the size of the room that we play in factor to this? someone said try panning to the speaker im closes to. will this help? i guess i'll try lowering everyone else volume down. if you guys have anymore tips just let me know. thanks again.
#15
I'd say get a DI box or some sort of amplifier, then run that into the PA. At my church we have two guitarists who run DI, and when no one else is playing you can hear them just fine, but I can hear the bass more than I can hear them when everyone joins in.
#16
I used to play like this all the time, cept it was a bunch of pedals straight into the mixer board. Most likely you dont have a seperat monitor amp to power and seperate the guitar out of the main mix so you can hear yourself. But that dosent explain why your not being heard, try hooking your guitar striaght up to the PA without the line 6 thing. If you still aint getting any sound, I would do three things, try checking connections, or get a new PA amp, get a new mixer board.

Does your guitar sound just fine at home on your amp?
#17
Are you using presets that you made at home when playing at lower volumes? That might be the problem. The louder you turn up an amp or PA or whatever, the more the bass and treble dominate the mix and the less mids you have. It's called the Fletcher-Munson effect, look it up on wikipedia if you want.
The problem is that the mids are actually the part of your sound that gets you heard. You can't compete with the drums when it comes to the high end and you can't compete with the bassist when it comes to low end, but the mids are all yours. Turn them up.

This is a problem I've had with all sorts of solid state amplification in the past, it's less noticable with most tube amps.


EDIT:
^Plugging the guitar straight into the PA is probably no use, he needs some sort of preamp to get the signal to line level.
Last edited by TheQuailman at Sep 16, 2009,
#18
sorry i dont really know anything about PA system. lol

and what is this DI box?

im using my own preset. and my mids and treble are about in the 80's and my bass lower than 40s.

i did try hoooking my guitar strraight to the pa without the podx3live and it sounded ugly. so i wont be doing that again. i can always use an amp. but my amp doesnt sound that good compare to when i play straight to the pa.

also, is having a better pa system help me solve this problem?
Last edited by initialxig at Sep 16, 2009,
#19
well set the fader volume to 0 and just apply gain where needed
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#20
i find, i need my channel to be about 2 or 3 notches higher than the vocal mics, and about the same as the bass.

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#21
Quote by initialxig
sorry i dont really know anything about PA system. lol

and what is this DI box?

It's a device that connects a high impedance output to a low impedance input - for example, you can hook up something that outputs at line level, like your pod, to the input of a mic preamp on a PA. Since most PAs have inputs that accept line level signals though, this shouldn't be a concern for you.
There's other DI boxes as well specifically designed for use with guitar amps, they act like a speaker simulator and link an amp's power amp (which outputs way above line level) with a PA's input (line level). This way, no actual speaker is in the signal path, which means you can for example record silently or plug your amp directly into the mixing board at gigs, without having to mic your amp. Again, since you're using a pod, you don't need to worry about any of this.


Quote by initialxig
im using my own preset. and my mids and treble are about in the 80's and my bass lower than 40s.

That should get you heard, given the volume is high enough. Try experimenting with the settings in the rehearsel space anyway. Does the PA have an EQ, or just volume controls for each input?


Quote by initialxig
also, is having a better pa system help me solve this problem?

It depends on how good or bad the actual system is. Do other band members like a singer or keyboarder use the PA as well? If so, do they have problems being heard as well?
#22
Quote by TheQuailman

EDIT:
^Plugging the guitar straight into the PA is probably no use, he needs some sort of preamp to get the signal to line level.
He's not plugging his guitar into the PA. He's plugging a X3 Live into the PA. You should have no problems with the X3 outputting the necessary signal level as an input to a PA.
#24
Quote by TheQuailman
Are you using presets that you made at home when playing at lower volumes? That might be the problem. The louder you turn up an amp or PA or whatever, the more the bass and treble dominate the mix and the less mids you have. It's called the Fletcher-Munson effect, look it up on wikipedia if you want.
The problem is that the mids are actually the part of your sound that gets you heard. You can't compete with the drums when it comes to the high end and you can't compete with the bassist when it comes to low end, but the mids are all yours. Turn them up.

This is a problem I've had with all sorts of solid state amplification in the past, it's less noticable with most tube amps.


EDIT:
^Plugging the guitar straight into the PA is probably no use, he needs some sort of preamp to get the signal to line level.



Well, the way my PA was set up, I would plug my 1/4 into a DI box, which would go into an XLR snake system to the mixer board, from the mixerboard into the amp, from the amp to the monitor amp( from the monitor amp to the monitors), and from the amp to the PA speakers in a split so it gave it 50-50 volume in each speaker. Its a two channel 700watt yamaha amp.

So basicly I could plug straight into the PA without any kind of boost and sounded just fine. I used to just use the send on my FX loop on my tube amp, and it worked just fine.
#25
Well, you had the mixerboard hooked up to an amp before it got to the monitor amp, so you had your signal up to a level high enough before it hit the monitor amp.
That's not the case with most PA setups, they just have the monitor amp and require a line level input.

At least, that's how I understand it.
#26
Quote by TheQuailman
Well, you had the mixerboard hooked up to an amp before it got to the monitor amp, so you had your signal up to a level high enough before it hit the monitor amp.
That's not the case with most PA setups, they just have the monitor amp and require a line level input.

At least, that's how I understand it.



Well, at least I got something particaly right, the only problem we had with that set up is that the monitor amp was a two channel amp with a volume knob for each channel, so you would basicaly get a couple instrument in the same monitor, and you couldent adjust the volumes of each instrument in each channel. But it helped alot in hearing yourself out of the main mix.

Our PA was so freaken Jerry riged. lol
#27
i think our pa has eq. so how do i set up the eq?

and yes there are others that uses the PA. actually everyone in our band runs straight to the pa. singers i can hear perfectly, acoutic i can hear once in awhile, piano same as the acoustic, and bass i can really hear it perfectly. so is having all these stuff affects my single or what?
#28
Quote by initialxig
i think our pa has eq. so how do i set up the eq?

and yes there are others that uses the PA. actually everyone in our band runs straight to the pa. singers i can hear perfectly, acoutic i can hear once in awhile, piano same as the acoustic, and bass i can really hear it perfectly. so is having all these stuff affects my single or what?



No, it shouldent, I think whoever is mixing the signels dosent know what there doing. All PA mixer boards have EQ, they have an EQ for each channel and a Master EQ for the overall mix. Prolly someone doesnt know how to work the Channel EQ and is cutting out most of the instruments.

But to set up an EQ you just adjust each channel till it sounds decent, then while your all playing a song you have someone EQ it futher to filter out or filter in different instrumsrumts. All those knobs going up in a straight line on each channel, thats your EQ, your top ones should be for you Tremble signals, middles for mids, and the bottom ones closest to the volume control for your lows. There also should be a decible knob that also controls the volume at the very top.

But as to how you should EQ, thats completly up to you.