#1
Unfortunately, searching for 'fingerpicking' under lessons yields two results. This guide explains the placement of fingers in a very brief manner, and I still have some questions.

Why can't I use my pinky? I've got five fingers, why not use them all?

This is what I'm currently trying to learn -



On the first two notes plucked, I'm using my thumb and middle finger, and I overlap my middle with my index to pluck the third note (the open G string). Is this ok? Or should I be assigning a finger to a string, and stick strictly to that?

I'm just starting to learn how to fingerpick, and I'd like to learn how to do it correctly! When answering, please explain why! The more thorough, the better!

Thanks in advance!
#2
I'd just use thumb and index and then use middle for the open G and thumb and ring for the B on the A string and the open E.


I mean, it's not set in stone or anything, but it'll help if you use fingers continuously rather than having to overlap them like you describe.
#3
Finger picking is an art into itself, and like any work of art it has it's versions of interpretations. Good true instructional videos that I found on Youtube, here, and there all said the same thing, there is a "common" way to doing it for it just works, and then there is your way. If your way works, then there is no reason not to do it. So if you get the results as well as the sound using your pinky for whatever, then go for it.

Me personally at first I was doing thumb on E, A, and D, then from forefinger to the one right next to the pinky in this order: G, B, & E. But as I was doing it I found my G had a scratchy/muted tone to it. So I researched, and researched and found it's quite common to get a better sound use the thumb also on G. So I did that and it sounds MUCH BETTER!!!

The point is, experiment, research video clips so you can analyze the fingers, and find what works for you. In the end, for the most part I only use 4 out of my 5 fingers (that includes the thumb), and sometimes but hardly ever just use the pinky as an anchor for hand position.
#4
you can do whatever you want.

the majority of finger pickers and classical guitarists find that not using the pinky is more efficient (by observation and speculation, else otherwise they would be using the pinky).
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#5
Didn't read the pinky bit, he he.


I don't use mine because it's too short! . My right hand pinky is tiny and it can't reach the strings properly, let alone get a good sound. If I worked at it I probably could do it, but I've never needed it up to now in all of the classical guitar pieces I've studied so...
#6
Quote by fingerguy


Me personally at first I was doing thumb on E, A, and D, then from forefinger to the one right next to the pinky in this order: G, B, & E.

...

In the end, for the most part I only use 4 out of my 5 fingers (that includes the thumb), and sometimes but hardly ever just use the pinky as an anchor for hand position.


^ This for me also.

Agree there's no Finger-picking Police to haul you off if you break protocol. If you have to pick notes on the E and A strings together, or the E and D, you have to use your thumb and index finger.

I think it's just a standard and rule of thumb (no pun intended) to use the thumb for the bass strings, and the index, middle and ring fingers for the G b e strings.
Look, it's not like John Lennon is going to come back, whack you with a guitar and say "You're playing the fookin' thing all bloody wrong, ya fookin' arsehole." - My teacher on the many ways of playing any song.
#7
Quote by about
you can do whatever you want.

the majority of finger pickers and classical guitarists find that not using the pinky is more efficient (by observation and speculation, else otherwise they would be using the pinky).



like he said most classical players find the pinky insufficient because of its shortness, but some just grow it longer then the other nails to make up for length. like flamenco players