#1
Alright well I am a lead guitarist in my band. It is MY band. I started it and found all of its members, a vocalist, second guitarist, and an amateur bassist. I am COMPLETELY serious about my band. It is my love. I care for it and want it to go as far as humanly possible.
Here's the problem: although my guitarist seems enthralled by being in the band, my singer and my bassist seem like they could care less. My vocalist is not reliable in any sense of the word, and although my bassist has a five-string, she hasn't really ever played before.
Now I want this band to be the biggest it can but i live in a small florida town where there aren't many people musically inclined. I want to say, " listen, tighten up or your out," to both of them, but they ARE my friends and I'm really worried I won't find others and the band will fall apart.
~What do I do??~
#2
Its better to tell them that, if they're as good friends as you say they they will listen,
just dont say it so bluntly
"Guitar is tactile, It's about how you play it"
- Joe Bonamassa

#3
first of all, it can hardly be called *YOUR* band when there are several other people involved that contribute (ideally, anyway) equally to it's cause. It completely contradicts the idea of a "band", anyways.
Aside from that ignorance, what you should probably do is keep your guitarist, kick out your singer and bassist immediately. One extra string doesn't make your bassist any more or less valuable :\
If your band is as important to you as you say it is, you'll have no problem losing these two people as friends, and moving out of town if necessary to find additional, reliable members to keep the band afloat.
In closing, I still don't know why people resort to internet forums for solutions to these kinds of problems.
#4
why would you choose a bassist thats never played before? Wouldnt that just be a girl with a bass? lol
"Spin the middle side topwise. Topwise!"

"And there's Jimmy Page, the biggest thief of American Blues music"
#5
if you see potential in being successful, then when you next meet say that you see potential on the band, and that you feel that the vocalist is letting the rest down by what you feel is unreliable, and that the bass player may be out of their depth at the current moment
#6
yeah, i've had that problem, minus the calling it MY band. theres really no easy way to call them out, but sometimes its necessary for the sake of the music. heres what you can do; kick them out, move to austin tx, and take me on as the bass player.
#7
Dude... you sound like me right down to the small town in Florida part except my problems are with the second guitarist... but anyway how goods the vocalist? can he/she even sing?
But anyway you should tell them to get their act together or you'll have to put up with them screwing around the whole time, not taking things seriously, and keeping you from making any progress with the band
#8
Small Florida town? Unless you're in the middle of the Everglades, you're going to be in driving distance of some great music cities (or at least good). Pensacola, Tallahassee, Gainesville, Orlando, Tampa, and Miami all have pretty good scenes. (Well, Orlando if you're a cover band anyway) but I digress, this is not helping.

Tell them. "We NEED to get better." To take a leaf from one of my favorite movies ever, Almost Famous, "You gotta be honest and unmerciful." They may get angry at first, but it'll get in their head that they need to be good, and ultimately make you all better.
#9
To be honest, I know you feel, some people just seem to want to be in a band for the sake of it, not to actually work hard at it and make good music, which is a shame really.

If you're actually serious about music, you are either going to need to motivate your current members or find new ones. I see that they are your friends, and it's obviously difficult being in a band with friends as they take any criticism personally, rather than seeing it in the context of a band.

To be honest, people who are unreliable won't usually change with a quick telling off, you're either going to need to drill some discipline into him or it won't work.

I would ask why you have a bassist who can't play bass, though. Why do people think that just having equipment means they can play in a band?

There are 2 of you who are serious, that's a start. I would simply look for people who would take the band as seriously as you 2 will, it is probably easier to find new, dedicated members than to try and change the ways of your old members, as they usually won't change and you will risk losing them as friends.

Good luck
#10
Quote by Seek~&~Destroy
Alright well I am a lead guitarist in my band. It is MY band. I started it and found all of its members, a vocalist, second guitarist, and an amateur bassist. I am COMPLETELY serious about my band. It is my love. I care for it and want it to go as far as humanly possible.
Here's the problem: although my guitarist seems enthralled by being in the band, my singer and my bassist seem like they could care less. My vocalist is not reliable in any sense of the word, and although my bassist has a five-string, she hasn't really ever played before.
Now I want this band to be the biggest it can but i live in a small florida town where there aren't many people musically inclined. I want to say, " listen, tighten up or your out," to both of them, but they ARE my friends and I'm really worried I won't find others and the band will fall apart.
~What do I do??~



Well first I'd say chill dude try not to take it really seriously, remember it's about having fun.

I find that usually in a band there's always a member who puts in more effort than the rest, and looks like you're that guy. Just stick at it, hopefully your enthusiasm will channel through to your other members, then you can start making progress. People are more motivated if they feel they're part of something that is going somewhere.
"If I told you that, I'd have to kill you."
"Why is it like.. top secret?"
"No."

Last.fm
#11
Quote by Thrace
Well first I'd say chill dude try not to take it really seriously, remember it's about having fun.

I find that usually in a band there's always a member who puts in more effort than the rest, and looks like you're that guy. Just stick at it, hopefully your enthusiasm will channel through to your other members, then you can start making progress. People are more motivated if they feel they're part of something that is going somewhere.


Thing is, though, there's usually a difference between being the enthusiastic one, and being the only one that gives a sh*t.
It is supposed to be about fun, but waiting around for band members to turn up for rehearsals/soundchecks, or musically babysitting someone as they are just starting to learn their instrument is NOT fun, and shouldn't happen in a band that is in any way serious.
You say that they will be motivated when they start getting somewhere, but you don't get anywhere if you aren't motivated, there needs to be some drive in the band or nothing will happen.

There's only so much one person can do, everyone has to have the same amount of discipline and motivation for a band to work.

And that thing about motivation channeling through, for me at the moment, it hasn't happened. One thing that I've found, which TS may also have found, is that the more motivated I get and the more ideas for songs I get, the more the lazier band members tend to criticise me for my enthusiasm, no idea why
Last edited by SilentHeaven109 at Sep 16, 2009,
#12
Your problem is obvious. If it is YOUR band, then it is not their band. If it's not their band, why should they care half as much, compared to something that is at least partly theirs?

See, people are more apt to commit themselves - personally, creatively, and financially - if they have ownership of it. In order for them to have some ownership in the band, they NEED to have creative input, personal input, and even financial input. The more you invest yourself into something, the more willing you are to tough it out. Otherwise, nothing ventured = nothing gained. It's just another crappy job to walk away from when something else more interesting, convenient, or lucrative comes along.

You have to, have to, have to create at least the illusion that it is "our" band. Either that, it needs to be clear from the get-go that they are hired guns and it is YOUR band. When that is the case, like any other job, their commitment and enthusiasm will be directly proportional to how well they are being paid and how easy it is to make that money - just like any other job.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
Your problem is obvious. If it is YOUR band, then it is not their band. If it's not their band, why should they care half as much, compared to something that is at least partly theirs?

See, people are more apt to commit themselves - personally, creatively, and financially - if they have ownership of it. In order for them to have some ownership in the band, they NEED to have creative input, personal input, and even financial input. The more you invest yourself into something, the more willing you are to tough it out. Otherwise, nothing ventured = nothing gained. It's just another crappy job to walk away from when something else more interesting, convenient, or lucrative comes along.

You have to, have to, have to create at least the illusion that it is "our" band. Either that, it needs to be clear from the get-go that they are hired guns and it is YOUR band. When that is the case, like any other job, their commitment and enthusiasm will be directly proportional to how well they are being paid and how easy it is to make that money - just like any other job.

CT


I absolutely and completely 100% agree with this. Not only is this relevant here, but is becoming far more so in businesses as well. No coincidence there.
#14
Quote by axemanchris

You have to, have to, have to create at least the illusion that it is "our" band. Either that, it needs to be clear from the get-go that they are hired guns and it is YOUR band. When that is the case, like any other job, their commitment and enthusiasm will be directly proportional to how well they are being paid and how easy it is to make that money - just like any other job.

CT


Yes, good point there.

I find that many band members loose interest because there is no band leader. I'm not talking about the person who forms the band - I'm talking about the person who directs others as to what they should do.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
Quote by AlanHB
Yes, good point there.

I find that many band members loose interest because there is no band leader. I'm not talking about the person who forms the band - I'm talking about the person who directs others as to what they should do.


Agreed guys

I will say some people are different than others, some need to have input - creative voice, motion etc etc. Others just like it when there is one dude laying it all down. People have different needs based on thier personalities