#1
I want to know how i write a song in a day.

Does anyone have some suggestions?


Jason
Last edited by JasonRedo at Sep 17, 2009,
#3
Just start improvising some riffs and when you find a cool riff start playing it over and over again and start to change it up, then start over with it and try to add riffs to it, and keep doing this till you have a simi written song, then record what you got, then improvise a lead over it. Hell, thats what I've been doing for years.

The most songs I've written in a day is 5 songs. They sound alright.
#4
There is no exact time limit/formula for writing good music. For example, Jun Senoue wrote Watch Me Fly in 2 hours, but Yoshiki spent 4 years writing Art Of Life, and they are both amazing songs.

However, I would say that if you are trying to force songwriting, it probably won't be very good. Just play guitar, record yourself playing, listen back to it and you will eventually hear something good you can develop.

If you really need to get something done now, a simple G C D type chord progression is probably your best bet. It won't be a very good song, but it will be a song...
#5
You can quite easily write a song in 10-15 minutes if you're "in the zone" and everything's flowing.

Just play and - quite importantly for some people - record yourself... with a pencil and a pad of paper to write everything down.
It's just experimentation and repetition.. then you start to learn little tricks and pick out chord changes that you like the most.
It eventually becomes second nature and less hard work to quickly put something together.
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#7
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Or just play 12 bar blues and sing about your baby "gettin' y' down"


Quote by icaneatcatfood
On second thought, **** tuning forks. You best be carrying around a grand piano that was tuned by an Italian
#8
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Or just play 12 bar blues and sing about your baby "gettin' y' down"




Looks like we've just discovered the "formula" for songwriting
#10
Quote by ChrisN
You can quite easily write a song in 10-15 minutes if you're "in the zone" and everything's flowing.

Just play and - quite importantly for some people - record yourself... with a pencil and a pad of paper to write everything down.
It's just experimentation and repetition.. then you start to learn little tricks and pick out chord changes that you like the most.
It eventually becomes second nature and less hard work to quickly put something together.
This! I never thought I could do it, but I had to come up with something quickly last week and by plugging guitar into my laptop and recording my experiments I found I had a useable song in 20mins.

What did help a lot was coming up with lyrics first - they were pretty bad lyrics, but they gave me something to structure the song around.
#11
I always write songs very quickly, (as I'm sure you can tell!) but I can very rarely just decide "I'm Gonna write a song" and do it. But when I do get inspired I just grab a bottle of red wine and voila the song's done in about an hour.

But in terms of advice: Have a good idea of what sort of song or sound you're aiming for, Know your theory and have a bottle of wine handy, enough to get the juices flowing but not enough to get you drunk.
#12
Quote by zhilla
What did help a lot was coming up with lyrics first - they were pretty bad lyrics, but they gave me something to structure the song around.
For me it's not really the lyrics but the melody. Sometimes I sing words that don't even make sense to begin with, but even if I'm just humming along with the chords it really can help with finding a good hook.
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#13
Quote by ChrisN
For me it's not really the lyrics but the melody. Sometimes I sing words that don't even make sense to begin with, but even if I'm just humming along with the chords it really can help with finding a good hook.
Thats kind of what I meant I think - I came up with some random lyrics just to give me a structure to write a melody against. Otherwise I tend to ramble rather than come up with an actual melody. Lyrics, however bad, give you a basic rhythm and phrasing as a starter for ten for a melody.
#15
To get in the habit of writing a song a day... You have to sit and write a song a day. Thats the basis anyway.. .inspiration aint gonna do jack cos she's on holiday for a while.

Like some of these people say, its practice that counts in the end. Sometimes you are lucky and have two complete songs... one in the morning, the other at night. And sometimes you are really lucky and they sound awesome. Thats why you listen to them the next morning, first thing. Why? Cos fresh ears will let you know how much u can bullsh!t yourself after a day of recording. If you are still impressed with them... bonus! If not... well its another day to experiment.

To be honest, I'd suggest 5 or 6 days to write... 1 day to give yourself a break. If you feel like writing, thats ok... if you wanna have a break, then have one.

But it all starts by going through Chord progressions... even single note riffs are based around chord progressions.... learn them, mess around with them and voila... your songwriting career starts.

Once you learn a progression... EXPERIMENT!!! Always apply what you have learned immediately. You are probably young... therefore take this advice and use it... no pubescent rebelry allowed.
#17
Quote by evolucian
how is power chords quicker?

quicker to write - you only have to draw 2 dots per chord instead of 3 or 4
#18
ah... I see. Silly me never saw that cos I was under the impression of power chords and chords "sorta" equalling the same therefore the writing process will remain the same time. But on paper i guess it would be quicker
#19
Quicker in notation - takes longer if you are writing out chord names, as you have to put a '5' after each power chord, and normal major chords are just 1 letter....
#20
1 letter? Are you nuts? C may be... but how is Am7b9 1 letter? Oh wait... I'm drifting from power chord logic in a big way. xnocturne7... you have to reply
#21
Quote by evolucian
1 letter? Are you nuts? C may be... but how is Am7b9 1 letter? Oh wait... I'm drifting from power chord logic in a big way. xnocturne7... you have to reply
Can you not read?! I said Major chords. Please read my post properly before answering next time!

Sorry - you were waiting for a reply from xnocturne7
#22
I'm sorry.. I can't read... did you say something? Or was it typed on something that could be mistaken for a post. Hahahaha... So when you say major chords... would that exclude maj9ths too?

To the TS: if you follow my advice and the other people's post before mine, you should have your answer. Good luck
#23
Using power chords has both advantage and disadvantage.

Advantage: As they have no third they are neither major or minor so there are more notes you can actually sing over them.

Disadvantage: Songs can end up sounding kinda sterile when you're not using any flavour notes.


Edit:
In the end, don't discount anything. Experiment as much with simplicity as you do with complexity (riff & chord-wise).
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Last edited by ChrisN at Sep 18, 2009,