#1
Hey UG,

I posted on here a while ago, I'm' a guitarist and a friend of mine needs a bassist for his band, so i'm going to give it a try. I think i have a line on a used fender p bass, and now i need an amp. there are lots of used amps on craiglist near me, so my question is how large of an amp (watts) do i need to play small venues like bars, that provide a backline.

tanks
#2
Depends on if you're gonna use some sort of sound system or not.
You can call me Aaron.


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#3
Quote by biga29
Depends on if you're gonna use some sort of sound system or not.



yes, the clubs give us backline (PA system)


Actually i have another question. Do bassists do DI into the PA without playing into an amp also?
#4
usually the bass dose di and uses amp
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#5
Quote by outerlimit501
yes, the clubs give us backline (PA system)


Actually i have another question. Do bassists do DI into the PA without playing into an amp also?


No, just line out from the amp to the system.
You can call me Aaron.


♠♣♥♦
Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#6
well, i've done ALOT of gig's and i have a trusty 80watt white horse bp80 amp, does a great job. nice and cheap too. i really recomend it
#7
Your power needs depend upon so many things you can't be definitive, but depending on what type of music you play, how bassy you want your sound to be, how efficient (loud) your speakers are you will get away with 100W but should aim for 200W. This should give you over 110dB at 4 metres from your amp which is loud enough to damage your hearing.

This is your backline amp. You need a backline amp on the stage to hear what you are playing but it is very common to put some of the bass through the pa to beef it up for the audience. You can DI or mic up your cab to do this. Most bassists DI.

I've written a guide to PA in the columns if you are interested.
#8
Quote by Phil Starr
Your power needs depend upon so many things you can't be definitive, but depending on what type of music you play, how bassy you want your sound to be, how efficient (loud) your speakers are you will get away with 100W but should aim for 200W. This should give you over 110dB at 4 metres from your amp which is loud enough to damage your hearing.

This is your backline amp. You need a backline amp on the stage to hear what you are playing but it is very common to put some of the bass through the pa to beef it up for the audience. You can DI or mic up your cab to do this. Most bassists DI.

I've written a guide to PA in the columns if you are interested.


Were you familiar with the Precision Device factory down in your part of the world?
G&L L2500
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#9
Quote by John Swift
Were you familiar with the Precision Device factory down in your part of the world?


No, I only know of them as manufacturers of speakers and had no idea of where they are based. I'll google them.
#10
Quote by Phil Starr
No, I only know of them as manufacturers of speakers and had no idea of where they are based. I'll google them.
You won't find them down south anymore they're now owned by Arthur Barnes's company (near Wakefield Yorks) who also own the revamped Fane and was up until recently the UK distributor of Eminence which is now under the Adam Hall banner.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#11
Quote by Phil Starr
Your power needs depend upon so many things you can't be definitive, but depending on what type of music you play, how bassy you want your sound to be, how efficient (loud) your speakers are you will get away with 100W but should aim for 200W. This should give you over 110dB at 4 metres from your amp which is loud enough to damage your hearing.

This is your backline amp. You need a backline amp on the stage to hear what you are playing but it is very common to put some of the bass through the pa to beef it up for the audience. You can DI or mic up your cab to do this. Most bassists DI.

I've written a guide to PA in the columns if you are interested.



I don't think I need an amp loud enough to damage my hearing by itself. If I did a DI into the PA, then wouldn't I just use a monitor to hear myself instead of using my amp as a monitor?
#12
You could, however monitors have guitar, vocals and whatever else running through them and aren't that great for low frequencies so it can become very hard to hear what you are playing. Also the fact with a bass amp you have a lot more control of your tone (depending on how you go into the system before/after the amp) and you'll be able to feel it more onstage are more reasons to get a bass amp.

I'd recommend at least 150 watts. Sure it may be more then you need to be heard but people buy cars with ridiculously high top speeds. Why? because if it has a higher top speed it accelerates to the legal speed limit faster. It's the same with amps. A 1000 watt power amp will sound better then a 100 watt power amp at the same volume with the same preamp, this is called headroom, the more the better.
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#13
It's entirely possible to go straight into a DI. There's a few pedals, like the SansAmp Bass Driver DI, that are designed to do just that. You have to make sure you have your own monitor mix though, and you can't always be sure of that, so it's better to have an amp.

I agree with what Phil said...aim for 200, don't go much lower than 100. The more volume you can get from your amp before it clips, the better.
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#14
I was joking about the deafness but being able to hit peaks this high gives you the chance to operate at an average level which will allow you to cut through the mix. Average levels at Glastonbury were measured at 100 dB which will cause permanent hearing loss after about 4 hours though according to the world health organisation.

You can go through the monitors though but it does mean that you need to have them designed for bass which is more expensive than buying a bass amp. You also hand over control of your sound to the sound engineer. Keep it simple and flexible by having your own amp.