#1
I was looking around and I saw that there are some guitars with a 2 piece, 3 piece or even a 5 piece neck...why? Is it to cut costs? Does a 2 or 3 piece neck affect the tonal characteristics of a single 1 piece neck? Just wondering...
#2
usually, laminate necks actually cost more to produce because of their extra labor. The different woods tend to stabilize the neck under weather conditions. It may also help stiffen the neck because they usually use a really hard wood (walnut, purple heart) sandwiched between maple or mahogany. It is also really pretty.
FS LTD EC-50 with GFS PowerRails Bridge pickup
#3
I see, the reason I'm asking because my guitar has a scarfed joint at the headstock I guess it would help it structurally?
#5
Ye. Scarf joint adds stability to the end of the neck which helps prevent breaking at that point. I've seen way too many guitar neck got break off at that point.
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ESP Standard Eclipse I CTM VW
ESP LTD Deluxe H-1001
ESP LTD Deluxe Viper-1000 STBC
ESP Edwards E-EX-100STD
Warmoth Paulcaster "Tiger"
Tanglewood TW170 AS
Vox Tonelab ST
Blackstar HT-1R


#6
Quote by aiur55
usually, laminate necks actually cost more to produce because of their extra labor. The different woods tend to stabilize the neck under weather conditions. It may also help stiffen the neck because they usually use a really hard wood (walnut, purple heart) sandwiched between maple or mahogany. It is also really pretty.



I disagree with your first statement.... laminate necks can be cheaper because they can use smaller stock which is less expensive than larger pieces or quarter sawn stock which produces more waste (again more money).
But I do agree on point two...you get a better neck than you otherwise would 9using the same stock) becuase laminating does increase strength and stability.
Some people prefer them to traditional quarter sawn necks, I myself do not because they are often found on more modern neck profiles.
Moving on.....