#1
Hello all,

it's my first post here but i've been dwelling abouts for a long time now...


Well, i wanna record my amp in its raw, noisy, brutal state. What i read is pluging my guitar directly to an audio interface won't give me the tone i want. So i guess that option is discarded.

I've listened to some stuff recorded by only one mic, mostly the SM57, and i wasn't very impressed. I mean, the sound was pretty good, better than i require. But the headroom... you could only listen the guitar, not the heavy distortion's vibrations.

That's my question, how much mics will i need to get a raw heavy\thrash\black 80s metal sound? is 1 mic enough? is a toneport ux2 good enough too? as i said, doesn't need to be clear was water, it just needs to have substance.

Many thanks in advance and sorry for the long text
#3
Quote by Vikingx
Condenser microphone maybe?

This might help. Also mixing in the bass later will help with getting the low end I'm guessing you want.

EDIT: Mic placement is also hugely important.
Last edited by Ekofu at Sep 18, 2009,
#5
hey i don't know alot about mics but I do have a TonePort and I really like it. It also comes with a program called Gearbox that uses tones of amp and cab models along with effects and all. and i know it has the sound you're looking for. i got mine for about $160 canadian, that was last year now they're about $140 canadian. so i suggest for home recording to use a tone port. or a recording interface like u mentioned.
#6
Aren't condenser microphones too sensitive for loud stuff?

As for the toneport, there's this guy i know selling the ux2 for 120€ i'll try to make it 100.

Thanks for the replies
#7
Quote by morkeg
Aren't condenser microphones too sensitive for loud stuff?

As for the toneport, there's this guy i know selling the ux2 for 120€ i'll try to make it 100.

Thanks for the replies


They can be, some can deal with it better than others.

From what I remember hearing from the studio engineer at my school, ribbon mics are more what you have to be careful with when talking about loud volumes.

Although, the fact he works part time at a school does make me wonder if he is the best source for info' like this He does run another studio though, so I don't know what to think of him.
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Last edited by Carl6661 at Sep 18, 2009,
#8
Quote by morkeg
Aren't condenser microphones too sensitive for loud stuff?


There are actually some that can handle very high SPL, but generally when using a condenser on guitar I just move it further back from the amp.
That only works if you've got a nice sounding room though.
#9
TDWP used all POD Farm for their guitar tone on the newest album.....a prime example of the fact that you don't need to record an amp to get brutal heavy tone.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#11
I record most all of my stuff using nothing more than a Line6 Guitar Port (Gear Box). Works for me.
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#12
sm57 works fine, and is considered more or less standard for metal tones

but also if the source sounds bad it doesnt matter what mic you have
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Last edited by Jaekae at Sep 18, 2009,
#14
Quote by CatharsisStudio
yeah but i can hear joey strugis's production a ****ing galaxy away it gets annoying sometimes. but he makes the guitars fit perfeclty


The guitars in his mixes are amazing....
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#15
Quote by Brendan.Clace
TDWP used all POD Farm for their guitar tone on the newest album.....a prime example of the fact that you don't need to record an amp to get brutal heavy tone.


All the more reason to avoid it if you want raw tones.

OP, if you're seriously after raw/lofi thrash/thrashcore/black metal/Venom/Discharge type tones then you're over complicating things. Most of those bands recorded their material with cheap amps into cheap 4 track tape decks with cheap mics. Sometimes the mics, preamps or tape itself would end up overdriven as well. That's where that rawness comes from.
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#16
Yeah i know that. But you know, these days the low quality stuff won't produce raw sound that much... cheap stuff won't even produce sound but digital crap.

Back then the sound was raw and imperfect but it worked, that's the big difference these days :P
#17
So, you need cheap analog gear.

Although, I like to convince myself I get decent 'cheap analog' sound out of my setup, maybe I'm just in denial. >.>
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#18
Well, perhaps i could find old analog stuff for cheap but then again, how would i add the drums and bass?

I mean, it's so easier to just buy the 100e interface and a 100e mic... I'm just afraid to waste like 300e with this and sound digitalz or having lag\signal problems like i had with fast track usb.
#19
Use cheap analog stuff as a front end to the best digital stuff you can afford, perhaps?
No gods, no countries, no masters.
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Be Serious.
Shorties represent!
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#20
A few years ago, I bought this little box called a Mike Mixer, made by the company Signal Flex. I think it was only $25 or so. It's a really simple devise, just 4 channels, each channel having its own seperate volume and its own quarter inch input. One master volume, and one output. I'll use 3 mics on my 4x12 cab, (2 SM-57's and a Beta SM-58). From the Mike Mixer, I can have all 3 mics go into one channel on my recorder and get a really big guitar sound. I don't know if they still make this or even if the company is still in buisness, but you might be able to find something similar.
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#21
Why the hell do you need 3 mics on one cab?
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#22
Quote by sesstreets
Why the hell do you need 3 mics on one cab?


Well, first of all, it sounds much bigger than one. What I do is place one right in front of one of the speakers. One back about 2 feet. And one sort of like an overhead. The sound is really BIG.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#23
Quote by seth's daddy
Well, first of all, it sounds much bigger than one. What I do is place one right in front of one of the speakers. One back about 2 feet. And one sort of like an overhead. The sound is really BIG.


you got any clip of that?
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#25
Quote by seth's daddy
A few years ago, I bought this little box called a Mike Mixer, made by the company Signal Flex. I think it was only $25 or so. It's a really simple devise, just 4 channels, each channel having its own seperate volume and its own quarter inch input. One master volume, and one output. I'll use 3 mics on my 4x12 cab, (2 SM-57's and a Beta SM-58). From the Mike Mixer, I can have all 3 mics go into one channel on my recorder and get a really big guitar sound. I don't know if they still make this or even if the company is still in buisness, but you might be able to find something similar.



avoid this.
#26
There is NO point in using 3 mics for a single cab even if they are placed around differently.
Pain is an illusion.
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#27
A guitar track might sound good alone and suck in a mix.
A guitar track might sound bad alone and be awesome in a mix.