#1
Hello people,

I'm trying to compose some songs but I'm tired of the common chord progressions like Am F C G or Dm C Bb C. So, can anyone suggest me a couple of cool but uncommon chord progressions? I'd like to use them for melodic rock and metal songs, possibly melancholic.

Thanks.
#3
Quote by Poglia
Hello people,

I'm trying to compose some songs but I'm tired of the common chord progressions like Am F C G or Dm C Bb C. So, can anyone suggest me a couple of cool but uncommon chord progressions? I'd like to use them for melodic rock and metal songs, possibly melancholic.

Thanks.


Try using your ears and see what you come up with.

It's really not that hard. You just use yours and decide for yourself what sounds good, rather than plugging in chords that you know fit a key based on your theory studies.
shred is gaudy music
#4
^^^For what yer asking, yeah, there really isn't any better answer then what guitarmunky said. The alternative is for me to go off on a tangent explaining a bunch of BS about chord progressions. My advice is to look up the tab of some of yer favorite melodic rock/metal songs and use your creative license from there.
Gear:
Inflatable Guitar
Digitech GSP 2101/Mosvalve 962/Yamaha S412V
My Imagination
#6
Quote by Anteaterking
I try to start out by finding two chords that sound cool alternating between. For example C major to Ab major. After alternating between those two for a while, try to add one or two more chords to the mix.


Your problem is most likely how you're playing your chords. You have to learn how to voice things differently, and then use melodies to connect chords that aren't diatonic to eachother.
#7
Listen to some music other than music that uses I V vii V progressions. Try throwing tetrad chords in there. Get some 7ths, 9ths and other extension chords/"different" sounding chords, such as diminished and augmented. Try using some stuff that has chromatic movements like C G Bb F. The chromatic movement is C B Bb A. The C and Bb are obviously the roots of their respective chords, and B is the third of G, and A is the third of F. Don't use that example though, because it's already in a song called "Killing is Killing" by Among Criminals.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
phrasing, palm mutes are also very important in coming up with good different progressions, can turn a simple progression into something unique. So you can play your simple E,A,D but you can make it unique.
#10
Quote by Anteaterking
Isaac, are you agreeing with me or saying that there is a problem in what I'm doing? I'm not the TC.


I meant that if your only really coming up with two chord vamps, and want to get away from that, I suggest using inversions and different voicings. If you're happy just playing two chord vamps, then that's fine too.
#11
Quote by Anteaterking
I try to start out by finding two chords that sound cool alternating between. For example C major to Ab major. After alternating between those two for a while, try to add one or two more chords to the mix.

do i sense radiohead much?

Often i write a melody first, then a chord sequence after - it might become immediately obvious what chords to use after writing your melody first. If i start with chords first i just end up playing other peoples songs because i'll inevitably recognise the sequence after a few bars.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
I meant that if your only really coming up with two chord vamps, and want to get away from that, I suggest using inversions and different voicings. If you're happy just playing two chord vamps, then that's fine too.


I do get away from it. I'm giving the TC advice on places to start.
#13
As for metal, don't think to much about chords. Think about some melodical riffs, as when you play powerchords it's unnessecary to think if a chord should be minor or major.

Start with simple things and if they sound good it's oky. Later you can still think about the progression and what you did and learn from your experiments.