#1
Anyone ever notice that if you play an open string and let it ring, then play another note on a different string and bend it, the pitch of the open string goes down a little bit?

Why is this? How come I don't hear this in music?
I can't wait till my fro is full grown.
#2
Happens with any floating trem system. Think about the physics and you'll get it.
#3
doesn't happen for me
Either they're something wrong with your guitar or you're hearing the open string slightly different because of the bending string

Or what the guy above me said
#4
when you bend a string your putting more tension on the neck, so the head of the guitar moves closer to the bridge making the strings have less tension, so the pitch bends down a bit.
#5
Quote by stratman7
Happens with any floating trem system. Think about the physics and you'll get it.


+1 although I don't think there's too much physics more so of a phythagoras theorem problem. Maybe you could do it as a physics problem but I wouldn't know how nor would I care too much.
#6
Quote by azn_guitarist25
+1 although I don't think there's too much physics more so of a phythagoras theorem problem. Maybe you could do it as a physics problem but I wouldn't know how nor would I care too much.

Pythagoras? What has it got to do with triangles? It is physics. Tension in the strings = tension in the springs when the trem is floating parallel to the body. When you bend, you increase the tension in the strings, pulling the trem forward, reducing the tension in the other strings.
#7
Quote by littlephil
Pythagoras? What has it got to do with triangles? It is physics. Tension in the strings = tension in the springs when the trem is floating parallel to the body. When you bend, you increase the tension in the strings, pulling the trem forward, reducing the tension in the other strings.


Well you have a string that ends at the locking nut and at the locking saddle right? Cut that string in half. Now when you bend up you keep that same half string length at an angle but if you were to draw a straight line from the original point to the end of the half string length at an angle that length will no longer be at a the half string length will it? It would be shorter since the longer side is opposite the larger angle. So wouldn't that mean the total string length from the bridge to the nut when you bend the string also be shorter?

Like the last time I commented that when you bend the the increase in tension will pull the trem forward a luthier said that I was wrong, and this is probably the only other explanation that I could come up that would also probably get the same answer.

Edit: okay reading through my explanation seems a bit more like a crackpot theory given that the angle with regards to bends isn't as great.
Last edited by azn_guitarist25 at Sep 19, 2009,