#1
I was at guitar center and some guy who works there was telling me that as a guitar gets older and gets played a lot the wood gets harder which makes it sound better? is this true?
Guitars
Gibson Les Paul Studio Alpine white
Agile Al-2000 59' LP
Fender Frankenstrat
Amps
Line 6 Spider III 75
Effects
Dunlop Slash SW-95 Wah
Digitech Grunge pedal
#2
Depends?

Is it a 1960s Piece of wood with a neck, Bridge and pickup compared to a Fender Custom Shop?
My Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Peavey Vypyr 30
DW Collector's 3 pc drums
Mapex Black panther snare
Sabian AAX/Zildjian K cymbals.
#3
That totally depends on the guitar, and the quality of the wood and the construction of the guitar.
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Classic Ebony with gold hardware
Fender American Stratocaster 3 color sunburst maple fretboard tortoise shell pickguard
Martin 000-M Auditorium
Mesa Boogie F-50
Maxon OD-9
Dunlop 535Q Wah pedal
#5
Usually. Some old guitars have been cared for, and have a nice broken in tone, but others were left in basements and stuff for years and years warping and they suck.
Jesus wouldn't give you the sweat off of his balls if you were dying of thirst.
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#6
This is true about acoustic guitars. As the wood ages the sound becomes alot better the same is true about other acoustic instruments like violins cellos mandolins

as for electrics...i dont think the sound gets any better considering the wood wont have alot of effect over the electronics (sound may in fact get worse over time)
But electric guitars definitely become more valuable over time. Authentic Vintage electric guitars can easily reach into six figure sums
#7
I'd say with electrics it's more how older guitars feel, providing they've been looked after they tend to just feel a little more worn in and comfortable, like your favourite pair of old jeans are more comfortable than a new pair if you get my meaning. Acoustics sonically do change quite a bit with age but with electrics it's marginal at best.
#8
Quote by p o e
Usually. Some old guitars have been cared for, and have a nice broken in tone, but others were left in basements and stuff for years and years warping and they suck.


My guitar was left in a basement for about 10-30 years and it's perfect...
You can call me Aaron.


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Out on parole, any more instances of plum text and I get put back in...
#9
Quote by DarkStarzInc.
I was at guitar center and some guy who works there was telling me that as a guitar gets older and gets played a lot the wood gets harder which makes it sound better? is this true?
Old guitars do sound better, but it's not because the wood is aging, the term "old wood" gets thrown around a lot with the les paul crowd who say that the wood and PAFs are the biggest reasons why the '50s les pauls are superior to the modern day les paul, but "old wood" doesn't mean that the guitar is old, the "old" part refers to the fact that the wood is old growth wood, which in turn is more lightweight, yet harder, making the guitar loud, bright and resonant while maintaining great sustain and character.
#10
Quote by al112987
Old guitars do sound better, but it's not because the wood is aging, the term "old wood" gets thrown around a lot with the les paul crowd who say that the wood and PAFs are the biggest reasons why the '50s les pauls are superior to the modern day les paul, but "old wood" doesn't mean that the guitar is old, the "old" part refers to the fact that the wood is old growth wood, which in turn is more lightweight, yet harder, making the guitar loud, bright and resonant while maintaining great sustain and character.


This, however, you have to realize what they finish in. The old 50s Les Pauls and Fenders were finished in nitro, which is supposed to help guitars breathe better (very arguable). Though, I don't think an old Poly finished guitar will sound anywhere near as good as an old nitro finished guitar.
#11
Yes that is true, but most guitars which are "comparable" models with their older counterparts are also finished in nitro. Example, why an R9 doesn't sound like a true 1959. Difference is the wood.
#12
Quote by al112987
Yes that is true, but most guitars which are "comparable" models with their older counterparts are also finished in nitro. Example, why an R9 doesn't sound like a true 1959. Difference is the wood.


Yes, but lets say you had a 1982 MIJ '57 reissue that's finished in poly. Then you had a 1982 MIA '57 reissue finished in nitro. The MIA will most likely sound relatively better (based upon opinions) compared to the MIJ finished in poly.