#1
Hi all,
I'm learning modes right now and I'm starting to understand them. Is this right- Modes are all wraped up in the major scale(major scale modes) but starting on a different root note to get a different feel during a solo/somg. So if i learn the whole major scale(along the neck) and then i move it to different positions during the same chord progression it would be changing the mode. i.e Key is A the major scale pattern starts on the 5th fret (A)and the dorion mode is the same pattern but starting on 7th fret(B). Does that sound right?

Any help appreciated!
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#2
Changing the note you start on won't give you a different mode. You need to change the harmony lying underneath. Technically though, yes you can use your major scale shape for all the modes.

Here's a nice lesson by Guthrie Govan, clearly demonstrating the difference in sound between the Ionian and the Dorian mode:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnOV7iKR1vE
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#3
ok that honestly made no sense at all to me haha could you explain that in different terms. what do you mean the harmony underneath?
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#4
Yes. Playing the A major scale starting with the B note is B Dorian.
In general if you want to figure out the notes of a mode without referring to the major scale, this how you do it.


Ionian: Major Scale
Dorian: Minor Scale with a raised 6
Phrygian: Minor scale with a flat 2nd
Lydian: Major Scale with a raised 4th
Mixolydian: Major Scale with a flat 7th
Aeolian: Natural Minor Scale
Locrian: Minor Scale with a flat 2nd and flat 5th
#5
Quote by mr_tea
ok that honestly made no sense at all to me haha could you explain that in different terms. what do you mean the harmony underneath?


He means that eventually the mode get its name from the tonic it wants to resolve to.
You can only create the feeling of resolution by means of changing the harmony.
For example: D dorian has the same notes as C major. If you would play D dorian without anything, you would notice that it wants to resolve to C more strongly than D, making it C major and not D dorian. This is because of the innate instability of modes. You can check the mode sticky for more info about that subject. However, if i would drone a D note for a couple of measures, and play the same notes (D dorian or C major) while starting on D, i would hear that it wants to resolve to D more strongly than C, hence making it D dorian. So only changing the root is not enough, you should change the tonic and you do that with the supportive harmony.
#6
Quote by Amer91
Yes. Playing the A major scale starting with the B note is B Dorian.

No it's not. It doesn't make a difference what note it starts on. If it resolves to A it's still A major.

Take the example in the video. He's playing D dorian over a Dm7 - G9 vamp. Because those chords suggest D as the tonic it comes of as D dorian instead of C major.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#7
ok that makes sense i know how to do the steps to get to the formulas. next question is how do i know which mode to use over what cxhords?
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#8
You usually don't need to worry about that since most music isn't modal. All diatonic progressions can be covered by using the major or minor scale, and even when playing over a non-diatonic progression I suggest simply altering the major or minor scale to fit the chords you're playing over.

When that is said each mode is usually linked with certain chords, mixolydian over dominant chords, locrian over half-diminished chords etc. Just look at the formulas and pay attention to the areas where they differ from the major or minor scale.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#9
Quote by mr_tea
ok that makes sense i know how to do the steps to get to the formulas. next question is how do i know which mode to use over what cxhords?


Because most music is tonal, it's obsolete to use modes over these progressions, major or minor is enough. The question really is, which chords do I play so that the mode I want to play is fairly stable, so that -for example- my song in D dorian doesnt want to resolve to C. This you also can find in the sticky about modes.
Last edited by deHufter at Sep 20, 2009,
#10
feel like a prize class idiot. didnt even look at the stickie. sorry guys thanks heaps though.
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#12
Quote by 7even
No it's not. It doesn't make a difference what note it starts on. If it resolves to A it's still A major.

Take the example in the video. He's playing D dorian over a Dm7 - G9 vamp. Because those chords suggest D as the tonic it comes of as D dorian instead of C major.


I didn't mean that the scale is A major, I mean that both A major and B Dorian contain the same notes.
#13
Quote by Amer91
I didn't mean that the scale is A major, I mean that both A major and B Dorian contain the same notes.

Well ok, I was just trying to clear up.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#14
Quote by mr_tea
feel like a prize class idiot. didnt even look at the stickie. sorry guys thanks heaps though.

Yeah man have a look at the sticky. I posted my own notes on modes in another thread a while back then put them in my sig cause I found myself posting them a couple times. Check 'em out - might help.
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