#1
Is it better to just "feel" the rhythm and know what it sounds like? I find it hard to count unless I'm sitting on one note and it's just straight quarters, 8ths, 16ths, etc or if you're just letting a chord ring out for a couple bars (strum chord, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, strum). Especially when there's rests..check out this video for example.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6zMmN_hcZ8&feature=channel_page
(this guy is a great teacher btw)

I can see how he claps and counts the rhythm, but in a real situation when you're playing a song or even improvising a rhythm, isn't it better to just tap your foot and get a "feel" going kinda? Thoughts please. I do know how to count rhythms by the way, but when there's rests I get kind of thrown off, so I just go by "feel" and hear it in my head, if that makes any sense?
#3
yeah, you gotta be in the groove
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#5
Some times I count. Like, if I have to hold a note over a 7/8 measure and I'm by myself, I'll count. If I'm playing with the music, I don't have to. Imagining the music in my head also works.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#6
Count, tap your foot, nod your head, whatever works. I usualy only do the last two
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#7
Yeah, I'll nod my head. Or if I'm really into it I'll swing my guitar back and forth to the rhythm, pretty much get my whole body involved. It's also good practice for stage presence.
#8
I think it's better to just feel the rhythm in a stage type setting or when improvising. I rarely count anything unless it's in a weird time signature and I'm just learning it. I say it's fine to just feel it unless you're having trouble with the timing of a certain part, then you can tap your foot or count in your head or whatever.
#9
It's a transition, not either-or.
Count out loud while drooling -> count out load -> count under your breath -> count in your head -> feel.

Of course it depends on how well you have the rhythm in question down, so in practice you wind up going back and forth, feel for stuff that's easy for you, drool for stuff that's really hard.

Regardless of how well I have something down, I always tap my foot though. I find that I've got to have some part of my body involved in the action to truly "feel" it and be locked on well.
Last edited by se012101 at Sep 20, 2009,
#10
Quote by Rave765
Is it better to just "feel" the rhythm and know what it sounds like? I find it hard to count unless I'm sitting on one note and it's just straight quarters, 8ths, 16ths, etc or if you're just letting a chord ring out for a couple bars (strum chord, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, strum). Especially when there's rests..check out this video for example.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6zMmN_hcZ8&feature=channel_page
(this guy is a great teacher btw)

I can see how he claps and counts the rhythm, but in a real situation when you're playing a song or even improvising a rhythm, isn't it better to just tap your foot and get a "feel" going kinda? Thoughts please. I do know how to count rhythms by the way, but when there's rests I get kind of thrown off, so I just go by "feel" and hear it in my head, if that makes any sense?


I find it's good to practice counting rhythms. Then when you play, you won't have to think about it.... you can just feel it & express it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 20, 2009,
#11
Quote by GuitarMunky
I find it's good to practice counting rhythms. Then when you play, you won't have to think about it.... you can just feel it & express it.


+1

You should practice counting so much that when you play on stage its second nature.
#12
if for any reason your playing with a click and don't have any other instruments down you need to count though
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.