#1
Next time I go to my friend's house, we'll be doing some recording, mainly drum recording. Where would be the best place to set up a mic for a whole drumset?
#2
I'm pretty inexperienced, but from what I know, trying to record a full drumset with one mic is going to give you hell. Still, I guess you should probably wait for the more experienced posters here to reply.
#3
with one mic is going to be extremely hard to do, if you are experienced with recording i suggest doing multiple recordings and mix them together, like do one with the mic by the bass one buy the snare one above the drummers head for the cymbals, if you just want a crappy recording put it across the room from him and not in direct line with the bass drum.
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#4
It's going to suck. You're best is mic one drum at a time and make more than one track.
#5
Quote by TheEmoStrangler
with one mic is going to be extremely hard to do, if you are experienced with recording i suggest doing multiple recordings and mix them together, like do one with the mic by the bass one buy the snare one above the drummers head for the cymbals, if you just want a crappy recording put it across the room from him and not in direct line with the bass drum.


Nope, this wont work.
It will sound like a mess because the drummer is physically incapable of hitting the drum at exactly the same time (down to the millisecond) in two seperate takes.

try it, record yourself tapping a pencil on the table top, then record a second take and try to hit _exactly_ in time.

anyway, try placing the mic as a single overhead, and try to catch a balanced sound.
#6
Quote by TheDriller
anyway, try placing the mic as a single overhead, and try to catch a balanced sound.

this is what i would do. make sure you are listening to the mic with headphones as the drummer is playing a sample type song/track so you can adjust the mic so it picks things up evenly. same type of idea applies if you wanted to put the mic up high and on the other side of the room (maybe 6-10 ft away). i think ive only done it once, but thats how i did it then.
#8
Quote by TheDriller
Nope, this wont work.
It will sound like a mess because the drummer is physically incapable of hitting the drum at exactly the same time (down to the millisecond) in two seperate takes.

try it, record yourself tapping a pencil on the table top, then record a second take and try to hit _exactly_ in time.

anyway, try placing the mic as a single overhead, and try to catch a balanced sound.

Even with a click track?
#9
Quote by Alex Vik
Even with a click track?


yup even with a click. Humans are not remotely capable of performing 2 takes identically. It might appear close but when measured to the millisecond, we're always pretty far off. (plus i don't know how much your drummer would want to do 6 or so different takes just to record EACH piece of his drum kit) The only thing capable of putting out identical takes every time is a drum machine.

a one mic drum kit is gonna be tough.. but the best you could do is probably an overhead from behind pointing directly at the snare.

make your drummer hit the crashes with less force than usual too...

Best of luck!
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#10
Danny Carey's philosophy is to use the smallest amount of attachable mics that he can get away with.

Keep one mic hanging up top, and if you can angle it slightly towards the snares. If you can somehow get another mic you'd want to prioritize the toms and bass, so you could use a mic stand and set it up so that the second mic directly faces the drum set so that it pics up the bass drum and the toms nicely.
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#11
I know t his isn't always an easy thing to do, but if it were me, I'd try to convince my drummer that the recording would probably sound better if you programmed the drums, due to your lack of necessary equipment. Some drummers are cool about that, some not so much..
#12
put it above where the drummer is sitting
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#13
the only way you could get a quality recording with one mic is if you have the Neumann Binarual Microphone...other than that...its just about impossible
#14
you could do it with one mic, but you would have to do several test takes to decide where you think it sounds best from. but its still not going to be as good as it would if had 2 mics. and believe me, that second mic can make all the difference if you're wanting to get a good stereo image.
#15
Use a large diaphragm condenser. I would say set it above the kit pointing towards the snare but picking up cymbals. It won't sound great, but it's something.

Then sample over the kick if you have time.
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#16
The best place to put the mic would be directly over the centre of the kit, about 2 feet above it.

But its not gonna sound brilliant.