#1
Just wondering, say my band had a few recordings done (we don't, as of yet, but we're working out a practice schedule), but not enough for a CD. Also, what if we can't get studio time, and therefore the tracks are all off of webcams and MP3 players and stuff (the singer's MP3 player has a surprisingly good mic, although the drums will probably just be done on the computer), and not of the highest quality. Could we still put the tracks on iTunes or Amazon or something like that and be able to make anything off of it so we'd be able to get some money going for studio time (assuming the songwriting and everything is still good), or would it be a bad idea?
#2
It depends on how much it will cost you to do it. If it'll be relatively cheap to do, then there's no way it can hurt you. Either way, I doubt you'll make much money. The only way my bands have ever made money is from gigs. we never sold any songs
#3
My best suggestion is to download a free recording program like Audacity.

Then, find SOMEBODY with a P.A system. If your entire band plays insturments then somebody is bound to know sombody else with a PA.

Spend somewhere between $50-$200 on a audio interface (to plug the pa into the computer)

That way you can plug your insturments into the P.A, The PA into the audio interface, and record the tracks with Audacity.

This is a very basic setup, and wont get you the BEST sound quality, but certainly better than what you plan to set up.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#4
Quote by Vypor
My best suggestion is to download a free recording program like Audacity.

Then, find SOMEBODY with a P.A system. If your entire band plays insturments then somebody is bound to know sombody else with a PA.

Spend somewhere between $50-$200 on a audio interface (to plug the pa into the computer)

That way you can plug your insturments into the P.A, The PA into the audio interface, and record the tracks with Audacity.

This is a very basic setup, and wont get you the BEST sound quality, but certainly better than what you plan to set up.
All of the members of the band are unemployed (I want to get a job, but can't), so the bare minimum setup sounds like the path for us; any suggestion on where to get an audio interface (as in brands, what distributors to buy from, et cetera), and, if we can't find anyone with a P.A., one that will be worth every penny?
#6
Well from tunecore, it costs 20 bucks annually to have your songs up there. Then they take .30 from each song sale. So the question is: do you think you can sell 28+ songs just to cover the expenses? Then you start from $0 and make only profit (which you would need more or less $500-800 --> ~1000 song sales). for a professional EP. Unless you know you can get a lot of people to spend their precious $$ on your songs, don't do it.
#8
Quote by herby190
All of the members of the band are unemployed (I want to get a job, but can't), so the bare minimum setup sounds like the path for us; any suggestion on where to get an audio interface (as in brands, what distributors to buy from, et cetera), and, if we can't find anyone with a P.A., one that will be worth every penny?


You best bet is to go to guitar center and look around. There are countless audio interface brands, and some units actually come with recording software thats better than audacity.

As for a PA, I was kind of misleading in my last post. You dont really NEED a PA, just a mixing board.

I said P.A. because almost anyone with a P.A. has it plugged in through a mixing board.


Going to guitar center and speaking to somebody in the section where they sell all the DJ equipment and recording software will be able to help you, and at least give you a basic understanding of everything you need to record.

I doubt the sound quality from a mic into an mp3 player will sound good enough for people to be satisfied after purchasing.

Microphones have alot of trouble picking up the low frequencies of the bass guitar, and also the drums tend to drown everything out, and make things sound terrible.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#9
There's some really bad advice here. People are never going to pay for something that's badly recorded.

Why pay, say £1 a track when they could get take their digicam and record the gig themselves.

A PA system is for LIVE SOUND - although the advice was quite correct if you already have one you can use certain bits of it to do very rough recordings, but if you don't already have one it's not worth the effort.

Here, there are plenty of cheap 'demo quality' studios who'll charge about £30-£80 a song for very professional results, I strongly suggest you start looking into that.
Doing it yourself can work, but on a really tight budget you'll get much better results going to a pro.