#1
So ive been playing for about 3 years now, i know some theory (time signatures, tempos, really basic stuff). I was watching the Arsis we are the nightmare behind the scenes and there lead guitarist plays so perfectly and writes the greatest solos. So i was wondering, i always hear people say jazz theory and all that, is there a metal theory? I know i worded this kinda wierd, and im not someone who says, ive i learn power chords i can joinz avenged sevenfold yay!!! But i have been missing out on my theory and i need to get caught up. The only reason i bring up arsis is because watching the video inspires me to know and improv as good as they do.
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#2
Well I would imagine there is a type of "theory" for every genre. That is there is a portion of musical theory that you will you use more playing metal than you would playing pop.
#3
oh and what exactly would i be learning? lol or what has worked for you metal shredders out there?
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#4
Quote by Tig Bitties
oh and what exactly would i be learning? lol or what has worked for you metal shredders out there?


Obscure scales
Quote by theogonia777
and then there's free jazz, which isn't even for musicians.

Quote by Born A Fool
As my old guitar teacher once said: Metal really comes from classical music. The only difference is pinch harmonics, double bass, and lyrics about killing goats.
#5
Quote by Dream Floyd
Obscure scales


haha obviously but i mean as far as circle of fifths, different keys etc.
5150 III 100W, Mesa 4x12 Cab, Framus Cobra Cab, M-Audio Profire 610, ISA One Pre, SC607-b, Equator D5's, Countryman Type 85 Di box, Radial JCR, Superior Drummer, SSD 4 Ex, TS9, NS-2 and the list goes on and on
#6
Quote by Dream Floyd
Obscure scales


Hmmm, I'd wager that most metal uses the minor scale, and even the major scale.

TS, the best place to start, I think, would be to look at some metal songs. Transcribe them and see what scales, intervals, techniques, chord progressions etc are used. I don't think you'll find a definitive answer, but I'm sure some common ideas will come to light if you look at a number of different tracks.
#7
get your harmonic minor down, then look at the modes of that. that is generally where the 'obscure scales' come from. also look at the more middle eastern scales like the hajiz and stuff.
I gotta say though, the theory is all the same. it just applies more to certain genres than others.
#8
Quote by Tig Bitties
So ive been playing for about 3 years now, i know some theory (time signatures, tempos, really basic stuff). I was watching the Arsis we are the nightmare behind the scenes and there lead guitarist plays so perfectly and writes the greatest solos. So i was wondering, i always hear people say jazz theory and all that, is there a metal theory? I know i worded this kinda wierd, and im not someone who says, ive i learn power chords i can joinz avenged sevenfold yay!!! But i have been missing out on my theory and i need to get caught up. The only reason i bring up arsis is because watching the video inspires me to know and improv as good as they do.
If you only know really basic theory, start at the beginning - everything is built off notes and intervals, so unless you understand them, you'll struggle with anything that uses them.

I'd suggest you start here: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=58DA70A2123C71CD&search_query=freepower+ug+theory - thats Freepower's theory vids. They cover all the basics pretty well.