#1
Just wondering, how do you know the pitch of a harmonic? For example, say that on my bass, I play the 3rd harmonic on the E at the 7th fret; what would that note be?
#2
Listen to it.

But really, compare it to other notes until you find one that matches it. You should be able to figure it out fast enough that way.
#3
What I seem to be finding is that every time you go to the next harmonic, you go up an octave.
#4
What you can also do if you want to get technical is see what fraction of the string you are muting. For example if you mute the 12th fret it would be 1/2 which means the frequency of that pitch is exactly double the open string, thus it is up one octave. If it is on the 7th fret it is 1/3 and the pitch goes from A to E.
#5
The harmonic series follows ratio's of integers.

Here's a reference guide I made:
Harmonic 1 = 440 (2) = 880 = Perfect 8ve (1)
Harmonic 2 = 440 (3) = 1320 = Perfect 12th (5)
Harmonic 3 = 440 (4) = 1760 = Perfect 15th (1)
Harmonic 4 = 440 (5) = 2200 = Major 17th (3)
Harmonic 5 = 440 (6) = 2640 = Perfect 19th (5)
Harmonic 6 = 440 (7) = 3080 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 20th (db 7)
Harmonic 7 = 440 (8) = 3520 = Perfect 22nd (1)
Harmonic 8 = 440 (9) = 3960 = Major 23rd (2)
Harmonic 9 = 440 (10) = 4400 = Major 24th (3)
Harmonic 10 = 440 (11) = 4840 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 26th (db 5)
Harmonic 11 = 440 (12) = 5280 = Perfect 26th (5)
Harmonic 12 = 440 (13) = 5720 = Quarter tone flat of Major 27th (d 6)
Harmonic 13 = 440 (14) = 6160 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 28th (db 7)
Harmonic 14 = 440 (15) = 6600 = Major 28th (7)
Harmonic 15 = 440 (16) = 7040 = Perfect 29th (8)
Harmonic 16 = 440 (17) = 7480 = Quarter tone flat of major 30th (d 2)
Harmonic 17 = 440 (18) = 7920 = Major 30th (2)
Harmonic 18 = 440 (19) = 8360 = Minor 31st = (b3)
Harmonic 19 = 440 (20) = 8800 = Major 31st = (3)
Harmonic 20 = 440 (21) = 9240 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 32nd (d 4)
Harmonic 21 = 440 (22) = 9680 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 33rd (db 5)
Harmonic 22 = 440 (23) = 10120 = Diminished 33rd (b 5)
Harmonic 23 = 440 (24) = 10560 = Perfect 33rd (5)
Harmonic 24 = 440 (25) = 11000 = Quarter tone flat of minor 34th (db 6)
Harmonic 25 = 440 (26) = 11440 = Quarter tone flat of major 34th (d 6)
Harmonic 26 = 440 (27) = 11880 = Major 34th (6)
Harmonic 27 = 440 (28) = 12320 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 35th (db 7)
Harmonic 28 = 440 (29) = 12760 = Minor 35th (b 7)
Harmonic 29 = 440 (30) = 13200 = Major 35th (7)
Harmonic 30 = 440 (31) = 13640 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 36th (d 8)
Harmonic 31 = 440 (32) = 14080 = Perfect 36th (1)

The d represents half of a flat.


You won't ever get to that high of harmonics, but that is the entire harmonic series with the frequencies listed in Hz, relative to A440. You can use it to find what interval above a given note a harmonic is, and from that, find the name of the note.
#6
Quote by isaac_bandits
The harmonic series follows ratio's of integers.

Here's a reference guide I made:
Harmonic 1 = 440 (2) = 880 = Perfect 8ve (1)
Harmonic 2 = 440 (3) = 1320 = Perfect 12th (5)
Harmonic 3 = 440 (4) = 1760 = Perfect 15th (1)
Harmonic 4 = 440 (5) = 2200 = Major 17th (3)
Harmonic 5 = 440 (6) = 2640 = Perfect 19th (5)
Harmonic 6 = 440 (7) = 3080 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 20th (db 7)
Harmonic 7 = 440 (8) = 3520 = Perfect 22nd (1)
Harmonic 8 = 440 (9) = 3960 = Major 23rd (2)
Harmonic 9 = 440 (10) = 4400 = Major 24th (3)
Harmonic 10 = 440 (11) = 4840 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 26th (db 5)
Harmonic 11 = 440 (12) = 5280 = Perfect 26th (5)
Harmonic 12 = 440 (13) = 5720 = Quarter tone flat of Major 27th (d 6)
Harmonic 13 = 440 (14) = 6160 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 28th (db 7)
Harmonic 14 = 440 (15) = 6600 = Major 28th (7)
Harmonic 15 = 440 (16) = 7040 = Perfect 29th (8)
Harmonic 16 = 440 (17) = 7480 = Quarter tone flat of major 30th (d 2)
Harmonic 17 = 440 (18) = 7920 = Major 30th (2)
Harmonic 18 = 440 (19) = 8360 = Minor 31st = (b3)
Harmonic 19 = 440 (20) = 8800 = Major 31st = (3)
Harmonic 20 = 440 (21) = 9240 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 32nd (d 4)
Harmonic 21 = 440 (22) = 9680 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 33rd (db 5)
Harmonic 22 = 440 (23) = 10120 = Diminished 33rd (b 5)
Harmonic 23 = 440 (24) = 10560 = Perfect 33rd (5)
Harmonic 24 = 440 (25) = 11000 = Quarter tone flat of minor 34th (db 6)
Harmonic 25 = 440 (26) = 11440 = Quarter tone flat of major 34th (d 6)
Harmonic 26 = 440 (27) = 11880 = Major 34th (6)
Harmonic 27 = 440 (28) = 12320 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 35th (db 7)
Harmonic 28 = 440 (29) = 12760 = Minor 35th (b 7)
Harmonic 29 = 440 (30) = 13200 = Major 35th (7)
Harmonic 30 = 440 (31) = 13640 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 36th (d 8)
Harmonic 31 = 440 (32) = 14080 = Perfect 36th (1)

The d represents half of a flat.


You won't ever get to that high of harmonics, but that is the entire harmonic series with the frequencies listed in Hz, relative to A440. You can use it to find what interval above a given note a harmonic is, and from that, find the name of the note.
#7
Also, doesn't the order of harmonics correspond to the lydian dominant, or overtone scale?