#1
Here's my problem, I've got a guitar with just a single volume control and no tone controls, and it's a little on the bright side. I could change the pickups, but I like the current output and responsiveness of them and the overall tone. I could set my amp differently, but I don't like to mess around with that too much every time I change guitar.
I don't even want a full tone control, because I never use them. If I had one I'd still leave it at 10, I just want to round off the very top end which you get when you don't have a tone control in the guitar at all.

Ideas? Is there something I could install in the guitar that will just very lightly round off the top end of the tone (like a tone control set to 10) but that won't require any new routing and whatever (this guitar's finish is really nice and I don't want to risk ruining that, plus I simply don't have the tools for precise routing anyway)?

I thought of a concentric volume/tone pot, but the bottom knob that those use is too wide and wouldn't fit, one of the screws from the pickup selector switch blocks it.
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#2
i had a thread on this a while ago lemmie go find it
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#3
On your amplifier, Put mids all the way up, bass at about 2/3 depending on how bassy your amp is, and roll the treble to about 1/3-2/3 depending on where you want your sound. What kind of guitar doesn't have a tone knob??????? But anyway, if you want a less bright sound, you could always use a less bright amp, like a Crate. They have a lot of low end. So does a valvetronix if you want some digitalism.
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#4
You can put a capacitor between the volume and the output of the guitar or you can install a tone control so you can adjust it any time you want. It's not hard if you have some basic soldering skills (or your dad/grandpa/brother/neighbour)
#5
Install the tone pot but just leave it sitting in the back, if you never change it anyway doesn't matter if it is consealed completely in the cavity.
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#6
Quote by Bluesy...
On your amplifier
... Which I specified I don't want to change. I have four guitars I switch through frequently and my amp is set up perfectly for the other three, I don't want to change anything on that for this one guitar and going over and arsing about with the settings mid-performance isn't exactly much of an option.

Quote by WtrPlyr
You can put a capacitor between the volume and the output of the guitar
Wouldn't this just result in the volume control becoming a tone control, or it being like having a tone control set to 0?

Quote by random_B-RAD
Install the tone pot but just leave it sitting in the back, if you never change it anyway doesn't matter if it is consealed completely in the cavity.
No room for a second pot. Or maybe there is, but it would be a tiny, very tight fit and I'm not sure it'd really work.

Quote by Bluesy...
What kind of guitar doesn't have a tone knob???????
Lots. Kramer in particular made a fortune and became the top-selling guitar brand in the world in the 80's, and most of their guitars back then had simply one pickup and one volume knob with no other controls or options.
This one happens to be a rear-routed Telecaster actually, but yeah. 3-way selector switch, one volume control and the jack crammed in to one tiny control rout, hence why installing a tone control isn't an option and neither are concentric pots.
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#7
Quote by MrFlibble
... Which I specified I don't want to change. I have four guitars I switch through frequently and my amp is set up perfectly for the other three, I don't want to change anything on that for this one guitar and going over and arsing about with the settings mid-performance isn't exactly much of an option.

Wouldn't this just result in the volume control becoming a tone control, or it being like having a tone control set to 0?

No room for a second pot. Or maybe there is, but it would be a tiny, very tight fit and I'm not sure it'd really work.

Lots. Kramer in particular made a fortune and became the top-selling guitar brand in the world in the 80's, and most of their guitars back then had simply one pickup and one volume knob with no other controls or options.
This one happens to be a rear-routed Telecaster actually, but yeah. 3-way selector switch, one volume control and the jack crammed in to one tiny control rout, hence why installing a tone control isn't an option and neither are concentric pots.


What if you used an eq pedal? Even just a 3 band would suffice. I mean if you bought an MXR 10 band (Which are worshipped around here) it would work perfectly and I'm sure you could use it for plenty of other stuff too.

I also hear very good things about the danelectro fish n chips if your on a budget. This is the only thing I can think of without getting out the soldering iron
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#8
Quote by random_B-RAD
Install the tone pot but just leave it sitting in the back, if you never change it anyway doesn't matter if it is consealed completely in the cavity.

Do this. It's called a 'trimpot,' and there's almost definitely going to be enough room.

Once you've got it installed, leave the cavity cover off and play around with the control until you find a setting you like, then put the cover back on. You could also cut a tiny hole in the cavity cover and mount the pot so that it could be adjusted with a small screwdriver. Or not.
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#9
All you need to do is lower the pot value. if it's a 500k pot, replace it with a 250k. if it's a 250k, replace it with a 100k (or 150k if you can even find those anymore).

Simple as that.
#10
Quote by hendrixftw
What if you used an eq pedal?
Ha, I already use four EQ pedals. My pedal board is huge. I've thought about it, but if there's an in-guitar option I can do, I'd rather go with that.

Quote by Invader Jim
All you need to do is lower the pot value. if it's a 500k pot, replace it with a 250k. if it's a 250k, replace it with a 100k (or 150k if you can even find those anymore).

Simple as that.
I thought this would really quite heavily round off the tone though, as well as drop the output? I had been lead to believe that's why you use 500k for humbuckers and 250k for singlecoils. Wouldn't using a 250k pot soften the tone too much? I only really want to shave off the very, very top end.
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#11
i think the idea of getting a 500k pot, and using it as a tone, but then leaving it in the cavity, is the best idea.

you could allways get one of thoes mini pots, they are pretty small.
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#12
Quote by MrFlibble
I thought this would really quite heavily round off the tone though, as well as drop the output? I had been lead to believe that's why you use 500k for humbuckers and 250k for singlecoils. Wouldn't using a 250k pot soften the tone too much? I only really want to shave off the very, very top end.
The resistance of the pot affects the amount of treble much more than the overall volume.

I wouldn't even change pot. Just see what value it is. Solder a resistor of the same value to the two lugs at either end. For instance, if the pot is 500k, use a 470k resistor. (Close enough, is close enough.) Too soft? Try a 1 meg. Not soft enough? Try a 330k.
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#13
Dude, just roll of the treble of the amp, its not that difficult come on dont be that lazy. I dont understand you, you have 4 eq's and you still have a high end problem. Think about the people who have 1 ****ty amp, and no pedals, how would they sort it out? Easy just remember that for that specific guitar you should roll off lets say 3 off the treble, really not that difficult.
#14
Quote by divinorum69
Dude, just roll of the treble of the amp, its not that difficult come on dont be that lazy. I dont understand you, you have 4 eq's and you still have a high end problem. Think about the people who have 1 ****ty amp, and no pedals, how would they sort it out? Easy just remember that for that specific guitar you should roll off lets say 3 off the treble, really not that difficult.
I wouldn't do it that way.


The treble peak in a pickup is sharp and abrupt. Using a lower resistance across the pickup not only reduces the peak, but it also broadens it. It becomes more manageable.

Turning the treble down on the amp will lessen the peak, but it will also lower the treble outside of the peak. Chances are, he'll get a more usable tone if he turns the treble up (slightly) on the amp and uses a lower resistance across the pickup.
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Quote by Jackal58
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#15
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
I wouldn't do it that way.


The treble peak in a pickup is sharp and abrupt. Using a lower resistance across the pickup not only reduces the peak, but it also broadens it. It becomes more manageable.

Turning the treble down on the amp will lessen the peak, but it will also lower the treble outside of the peak. Chances are, he'll get a more usable tone if he turns the treble up (slightly) on the amp and uses a lower resistance across the pickup.

I understand what you say.

In my Les Paul Custom Copy, the bridge pickup sounds so ****ty if I turn the tone down, but if its on 10 its so sharp it hurts my ears. So I just roll of the treble of the amp. Just by messing with the amp I get such nice tones, I play with the bass, middles, treble, gain reverb, evrything, and I get cool tones, and I have such a ****ty amp, a frontman65.
#16
^once again, tone is subjective. I'd say SYK's got the idea, so that TS doesn't have to modify pedal/amp settings while playing live.
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#17
Maybe just a resister in series with a cap in place of a tone pot to ground. The resister value the same as a tone pot set to 10. If you just want the little bit of treb bleed you get with having a tone pot on 10 vs no tone pot. Or maybe a push/pull switch for the vol pot with 2 resisters 1 value of pot at 10 another pot set at 5 or whatever setting you like. A trim pot would work also but a resistor is .06 cents and a trim pot is .85 cents.
#18
Quote by Bluesy...
What kind of guitar doesn't have a tone knob???????


on guitars where people don't bother using them because they would never use that sort of sound. Like me, imo having 2 volume controls on a guitar with 2 controls rather than 1 volume and one 1 tone makes so much more sense to me. I don't understand why the likes of guitar makers especially for metal don't do it more often.
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#19
Quote by Tackleberry
Maybe just a resister in series with a cap in place of a tone pot to ground. The resister value the same as a tone pot set to 10. If you just want the little bit of treb bleed you get with having a tone pot on 10 vs no tone pot. Or maybe a push/pull switch for the vol pot with 2 resisters 1 value of pot at 10 another pot set at 5 or whatever setting you like. A trim pot would work also but a resistor is .06 cents and a trim pot is .85 cents.


wow, someone's watching the pennies... id say 85 cents really isn't that bad, and with a trimpot you can set it to what you like after you solder it, rather than trying out 3 or 4 resistors and having to de and resolder them each time
#20
Quote by eddiehimself
on guitars where people don't bother using them because they would never use that sort of sound. Like me, imo having 2 volume controls on a guitar with 2 controls rather than 1 volume and one 1 tone makes so much more sense to me. I don't understand why the likes of guitar makers especially for metal don't do it more often.


Well I play metal quite a lot now, though I prefer playing rock, and I thoroughly use both of the tone knobs on my strat.
#21
Quote by divinorum69
Well I play metal quite a lot now, though I prefer playing rock, and I thoroughly use both of the tone knobs on my strat.


In my nearly 5 years of playing the guitar, i very rarely if ever use the tone controls for any actual serious playing.
EH


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#22
Quote by Tackleberry
Maybe just a resister in series with a cap in place of a tone pot to ground. The resister value the same as a tone pot set to 10. If you just want the little bit of treb bleed you get with having a tone pot on 10 vs no tone pot. Or maybe a push/pull switch for the vol pot with 2 resisters 1 value of pot at 10 another pot set at 5 or whatever setting you like. A trim pot would work also but a resistor is .06 cents and a trim pot is .85 cents.
Yeah, that works too. If you're looking to cut the ton a LOT, it makes more sense to use a cap and resistor. But in managing the "peak" a resistor alone works quite well.

If it were me, I'd probably wire up a full-sized pot (shunt to ground) to a cable and dial down the resistance until I got the tone I was looking for. Then measure the resistance and put a resistor of that size across the volume pot.

Here's a graph that shows the change in frequency response of a Strat single coil -vs- resistance of the load:



Here's the site that came from:
http://buildyourguitar.com/resources/lemme/
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#23
Quote by eddiehimself
In my nearly 5 years of playing the guitar, i very rarely if ever use the tone controls for any actual serious playing.


Well my band does not rock on stadiums so sometimes the equipment is not top end, and there are times that I need to cut the highs on the equipment and I do it guitar wise.

I dont know, in my nearly 4 years of serious playing I started using the tone controls this last year.
#24
Well some think along the lines of economy. And for others its just gonna be what you have on hand. I know for instance I dont have any 500k trim pots but I do have lots of resisters in various values. Its not hard to figure out the value in this case for pot on 10, 500k, usually used for humbuckers. I usually use linear pots for tone control so figuring out values wouldnt be hard to do dont really need to measure pots with a meter for example.
#25
Quote by divinorum69
Well my band does not rock on stadiums so sometimes the equipment is not top end, and there are times that I need to cut the highs on the equipment and I do it guitar wise.

I dont know, in my nearly 4 years of serious playing I started using the tone controls this last year.


Well my equipment isn't top end but it does quite well i think. I generally just try to dial in my tone using the amp to lop off the top end.
EH


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