#1
Anyway I doing the lessons on intervals on musictheory.net and I noticed that a diminished 7th has the same number of half steps between notes as a major 6th.

I was just wondering if there's anything special about them that really makes them different or if they're pretty much interchangeable like a Ab/G# sort of thing.
#2
They are enharmonic which means they are technically the same note. It's all about context though, and you'll usually be using the major 6th as opposed to the diminished 7th. Unless of course in some diminished scales and a full diminished 7th chord.
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#3
Thanks a lot.

Oh yeah, are there any other music theory websites I should look into?
#4
I think that's a really great site that covers most topics. Of course there's also Ultimate Guitar, and you should also check the sticky's in this forum if you haven't.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#5
Quote by 7even
They are enharmonic which means they are technically the same note.

just to be pedantic - isn't it "technically" a different note but the same pitch or tone; - the note being the name/label or position on the staff, and the pitch or tone being the sound produced. - So same sound different name = Enharmonic

Yes the diminished seventh interval and the major sixth interval produce the same pitch. However, which one you call it is based on context.

For example in a diminished seventh chord you will have a root a minor third a diminished fifth and a diminished seventh. The diminished fifth and the diminished seventh are a minor third apart from each other. The chord is formed by stacking minor thirds on top of each other. (hope you know the basics of chord construction).

If you spelled the chord with a root a minor third a diminished fifth and a major sixth then the distance between the diminished fifth and the major sixth would be an augmented second instead of a minor third and it would produce a different result when notated on the staff as it wouldn't quite be a stack as to notate the second it would slip to the other side of the diminished triad stack.

Also if you have a diminished seventh then it means the minor seventh was lowered a semitone to get the note as opposed to the minor sixth being raised a semitone. This can give you a kind of idea as to what is going on in the bigger picture. The sixth is most likely minor for example, and the next note above the diminished seventh is the octave. If you call it a major sixth then it gives you a different idea, namely that the sixth is major and the next note up is some kind of minor or more likely a major seventh.

Hope that makes sense.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 23, 2009,
#6
Quote by 20Tigers
just to be pedantic - isn't it "technically" a different note but the same pitch or tone; - the note being the name/label or position on the staff, and the pitch or tone being the sound produced. - So same sound different name = Enharmonic

That's what I meant.
20tigers is right.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#8
Quote by 20Tigers
Lots of good information...


A diminished chord can also have intervals minor third, diminished fifth, major sixth above the bass note. This would create a diminished chord in first inversion, and thus the name of the chord would be based off the "major sixth".