#1
I'm supposed to come up with a chord progression that utilizes the dim. chord before switching to a minor chord in the key of E.
so far I have E Fdim F#- B7 Cdim C#-
could someone please play this and give me suggestion? it sounds to chromatic to me, but I feel like I need someone more experianced advice
Edit actually is I vi ii okay?
Last edited by emily92 at Sep 23, 2009,
#2
The viio chord can be led into the iii chord very easily. I don't know about your progression, but I'll look at it.
#4
Quote by emily92
I'm supposed to come up with a chord progression that utilizes the dim. chord before switching to a minor chord in the key of E.
so far I have E Fdim F#- B7 Cdim C#-
could someone please play this and give me suggestion? it sounds to chromatic to me, but I feel like I need someone more experianced advice
Edit actually is I vi ii okay?



I thought you needed a dim chord?

Maybe I-ii-viio-iii-vi-I.
#5
Quote by Well.......
I thought you needed a dim chord?

Maybe I-ii-viio-iii-vi-I.

I'm sorry, I don't think I'm making myself clear. My teacher wanted me to put a dim. chord one half step lower than the minor chord that follows, cause he said it supposed to create a good leading sound to the minor chord.
I'm still not sure if that ^ makes sense to anyone else. I don't remember how he put it exactly.
#6
Quote by emily92
I'm sorry, I don't think I'm making myself clear. My teacher wanted me to put a dim. chord one half step lower than the minor chord that follows, cause he said it supposed to create a good leading sound to the minor chord.
I'm still not sure if that ^ makes sense to anyone else. I don't remember how he put it exactly.

Did he want you to change key to E minor? If so then a D# dim chord will work.
#7
E major?
Well, D#diminished is in that key. You could throw in some kind of interrupted cadence and go to C#Minor.
If it was me I may repeat the pattern
C#Minor Amajor Emajor D#diminished.
#8
Just substitute a minor and throw in the D#dim.

This is a neat sounding progression, where you play the last 2 twice as short as the other chords, so fast change.


e|--0---3---0---2----------------------------------------------------------------|
B|--0---2---1---1---4-------------------------------------------------------------|
G|--1---3---2---2---4-------------------------------------------------------------|
D|--2---2---2---1---4-------------------------------------------------------------|
A|--2-------0-------2----------------------------------------------------------|
E|--0-------------------------------------------------------------------------|


Progression would be: I - vi* - iv - vii* - V

And there a thousands of other options

Oh, just read that half step lower than minor chord....
Last edited by deHufter at Sep 24, 2009,
#9
You can use the viio7/vi. This chord B#o7 is enharmonic to a D#o7, only spelt differently and resolving to a minor chord.
#11
Quote by emily92
is I vi ii okay


There's nothing wrong with using that progression, but in the context of an assignment where you need to utilize a diminished chord, it would be inappropriate to use a progression lacking a diminished chord.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
There's nothing wrong with using that progression, but in the context of an assignment where you need to utilize a diminished chord, it would be inappropriate to use a progression lacking a diminished chord.

well I'm putting dim chords one half step up from the appropriate minor chords, that what he wanted me to do I think
EDIT so really the prog. I'm doing is this: E Cdim7 C#m A B E Gdim7 G#m Fdim7 F#m Cdim7 C#m B E
Last edited by emily92 at Sep 24, 2009,
#13
Quote by isaac_bandits
in the context of an assignment where you need to utilize a diminished chord, it would be inappropriate to use a progression lacking a diminished chord.


#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
There's nothing wrong with using that progression, but in the context of an assignment where you need to utilize a diminished chord, it would be inappropriate to use a progression lacking a diminished chord.


I lol'd
#15
Quote by emily92
well I'm putting dim chords one half step up from the appropriate minor chords, that what he wanted me to do I think
EDIT so really the prog. I'm doing is this: E Cdim7 C#m A B E Gdim7 G#m Fdim7 F#m Cdim7 C#m B E

do I really need to say it again...
#16
Quote by emily92
I'm sorry, I don't think I'm making myself clear. My teacher wanted me to put a dim. chord one half step lower than the minor chord that follows, cause he said it supposed to create a good leading sound to the minor chord.
I'm still not sure if that ^ makes sense to anyone else. I don't remember how he put it exactly.

As I'm sure you know, I-ii-V-I is basically the foundation on which all progressions of this type are built. You probably know that the secondary dominant of the ii is VI7. I-VI7-ii-V-I in the key of E would be E-C#7-F#m-B-E. If we take the root out of C#7 we have E#dim. Leaving you with E-E#dim-F#m-B-E.

That's the basic principle. You're on the right track with the progression in your original post (E Fdim F#- B7 Cdim C#), but you need a resolution. If you want to continue this circle progression, the simple solution would be to tag another ii-V-I after your C#. Or you could add some more embellishments to that.

There's no way a progression could not sound "too chromatic" because of the chromatic root movement. That's the whole point. But honestly, unless you're playing bebop or something, this principle is most often used for turnarounds and stuff (just I-#idim-ii-V) because it can easily sound pretty "out there" if you extend it too far.
Last edited by werty22 at Sep 26, 2009,
#17
Quote by werty22
As I'm sure you know, I-ii-V-I is basically the foundation on which all progressions of this type are built. You probably know that the secondary dominant of the ii is VI7. I-VI7-ii-V-I in the key of E would be E-C#7-F#m-B-E. If we take the root out of C#7 we have E#dim. Leaving you with E-E#dim-F#m-B-E.

That's the magic there^

As a subsitution you can replace any functioning dominant (or secondary dominant) with a dim triad a major third above.

B7-E could be replaced by D♯dim-E

D7-G could be replaced by F♯dim-G

etc etc.

Why? As werty22 said the three notes that make up the dim chord are the same three notes stacked on top of the dom7's root note. In fact if you were to play D♯dim-E over a bass line that is playing B - E then the result is B7 - E.

The chracteristic tritone is still there which is resolved by each voice moving inward a half step to create a major third. This is retained when moving to a major triad such as F♯dim-G

In the case of the dim moving to a minor chord a half step up it's a little different as the resolution isn't as strong. This is because the vocies move slightly differently. In this case the root and m3 of the dim triad both move up a half step while the dim fifth moves up a whole step. It provides a slightly different sound and to my ear sounds a little more "chromatic" in nature and not as "cadential" as the dim-major move. It still works.

You can try it in any basic progression to get a new sounding progression...

i ♭VII ♭VI V i
in Cm = Cm B♭ A♭ G Cm

You could add the dim triad in the last two beats of the V which implies a G7 chord...

Cm B♭ A♭ G Bdim Cm

Then instead of sticking a secondary dominant before the G chord you could stick in a dim triad there too. This would give you

Cm B♭ A♭ G♭dim G Bdim Cm
Then you have a dim - major change and a dim - minor change in the same progression.

Or if you have an ascending version of the same original progression such as
♭VI♭VII i i (common rock cliche)
In Cm that would be A♭ B♭ Cm Cm

You could make a very chromatic progression indeed by using dim triads in place of secondary dominants leading into each of the last two chords...
in C that would be
A♭ Adim B♭ Bdim Cm Cm

All that is happening here is in the new progression we simply move the root up in half steps twice as fast as the rest of the chord which, when it does change, moves up in whole steps.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 26, 2009,