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#1
So, my bands going to record a few tracks for a demo in the next month or so and I was wondering if anyone has any tips for improving 'tightness' seeing as we're recording live multitrack (I'm not sure how to say it, I hope that made sense) and we want to sound as good as possible, thanks.
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"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#2
Make sure you have a click track going. I find that it helps for me to nod my head to the beat, not headbang but just basic nodding. Foot tapping might also work.
#3
Quote by pwrmax
Make sure you have a click track going. I find that it helps for me to nod my head to the beat, not headbang but just basic nodding. Foot tapping might also work.


Yeah, we're getting the drummer a metronome.
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#4
Quote by editthesadparts
Yeah, we're getting the drummer a metronome.

Everyone can hear it, not just the drummer? Unless your drummer is Ringo Starr, you're better off listening to the metronome than him.
#5
what I suggest have the drummer record with metronome first and if he has to let him play with a guitar pro of the rhythm track or something that usually makes it easier.
Than you guys record1 guy at a time. Rhythm and bass can be recording at the same time. Lead has to be recorded alone because he needs utter concentration on the tracks after they are 100% perfected to your standards. Singing is obviously the last thing you do. and do keyboard and stuff in a good VST supporting program unless you have an insane keyboard with great effects and such.

EDIT: also depnding on the quality of the studio recording and the sound of the drumset there is a program that over dubs your drum tracks with top notch samples of snares and such. You have to do this manually. I'll let you know what the program is when i remember its name
Last edited by mtgold83 at Sep 23, 2009,
#6
The best and fastest way to increase tightness is to rehearse together as much as possible.
#7
You should have practiced the songs to the point that you don't have to think about them when you're playing. It doesn't sound like you have done this yet, because you don't think the band is "tight" enough.

Also with the "live multitrack", are you recording a live concert? Or are you recording at home/studio? Unless you are actually recording a live concert, it's best to at least record the lead guitar and vocals after the rest of the track is laid down. The drum sound will bleed into the vocal/lead guitar track and will come through as you place those higher in the mix.

Recording with a click track is also important - and practice doing it FAR before the actual recording is done - it's not a skill that can be picked up on the spot.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Quote by pwrmax
Everyone can hear it, not just the drummer? Unless your drummer is Ringo Starr, you're better off listening to the metronome than him.


A horrible comparison, but your intended point is correct.

Most musicians don't even take notice of why a drummer is there initially, so it's a good start to either get the metronome for all, or for them to all work on playing to the drums instead of themselves.

Btw, the whole "horrible comparison" comment i made was in regards to Ringo Starr being a woeful drummer at best (in my opinion of couse, others will deter).
#9


Btw, the whole "horrible comparison" comment i made was in regards to Ringo Starr being a woeful drummer at best (in my opinion of couse, others will deter).


While not very showy, when they played back through all the recorded out-takes of the Beatles through their whole career (all the ones where stuff went wrong, they went off-key, etc), Ringo dropped the beat and caused the track to be redone seven times.

That's seven in about seven years. Good luck finding a drummer who can do that...

Anyway, yes, I'd agree with everyone else that you should try and record lead guitar/lead vocals separately. A good studio won't have any noticeable 'bleed' from track to track, because you should be recording in separate rooms or with the amps in soundproofed areas, but it's really, really annoying for everyone to be playing take after take because other people have messed up - which is most likely to be the lead guitarist or the vocalist, because those are the bits where getting it to feel and sound right is most critical and hardest. Get the rhythm tracks down solidly, then you can put guitar parts and vocals over the top.

Also, yes, if you think you're not tight enough, you're probably right. Go practice those songs until every member can sing along while playing his part and you sound like, well, like you want to on the record.
#10
FYI. Ringo is known as the worst drummer to ever be allowed into the hall of fame.. and if you knew anything bout dear old ringo he wasnt originally planning to be a drummer his entire life... He kinda was just the friend that they didnt wanna kick out.
#11
what the **** kind of a producer/engineer thinks recording all of you together is the best idea?
#12
Quote by mtgold83
and if you knew anything bout dear old ringo he wasnt originally planning to be a drummer his entire life... He kinda was just the friend that they didnt wanna kick out.


Previous to The Beatles Ringo played drums in many different bands. He was their first choice to replace their original drummer, Pete Best.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#13
The reason I mentioned Ringo is because his drums beats are so simple and repetitive that they're just as good as a metronome. He's not terrible, he could keep time, he's just uncreative.
#14
Quote by GrisKy
what the **** kind of a producer/engineer thinks recording all of you together is the best idea?

A professional one who's doing it for free as a favor.

Here's another band that did the same thing we're going to do with the same guy, not the greatest band, but it's just an example.
http://www.myspace.com/thepoolstaffband
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#15
Quote by editthesadparts
A professional one who's doing it for free as a favor.

Here's another band that did the same thing we're going to do with the same guy, not the greatest band, but it's just an example.
http://www.myspace.com/thepoolstaffband


pros don't do favors, they take on artists that they produce at their initial expense, but the idea is to shape them into something marketable so that everyone (mainly the producer) walks away with money... or SOMETHING to show for it.

who is this guy? your brother-in-law? I want a name.

the only time you go into a studio and track together is when you're looking for a baseline arrangement that your drummer can track to when you progress to individual tracking. I smell disaster, or at the very least some serious hours infront of pro tools.

this sounds in no way professional... but i'll give you the 'free' part, hard to beat that. you'll wind up with a fun demo to show your friends.
#16
Quote by GrisKy
pros don't do favors, they take on artists that they produce at their initial expense, but the idea is to shape them into something marketable so that everyone (mainly the producer) walks away with money... or SOMETHING to show for it.

who is this guy? your brother-in-law? I want a name.

the only time you go into a studio and track together is when you're looking for a baseline arrangement that your drummer can track to when you progress to individual tracking. I smell disaster, or at the very least some serious hours infront of pro tools.

this sounds in no way professional... but i'll give you the 'free' part, hard to beat that. you'll wind up with a fun demo to show your friends.

One of my bands once got that in exchange for beer and pizza.
#17
Quote by GrisKy
what the **** kind of a producer/engineer thinks recording all of you together is the best idea?


generally they put the amps in different rooms, theres no spillage or anything. its just so like, you the drummer needs to gesture to someone at a certain bit or something its easier. it also saves time. i got good results recording that way.
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#18
Quote by pwrmax
The reason I mentioned Ringo is because his drums beats are so simple and repetitive that they're just as good as a metronome. He's not terrible, he could keep time, he's just uncreative.


Well, he didn't write the drum beats for the most part. Paul, George, and John always tried to write drums and they couldn't for everyone's songs so it always fell on Ringo to try and please everyone. And he always said, "I'm a drummer, not a percussionist."

He got better after a while too.
#19
Quote by mtgold83
what I suggest have the drummer record with metronome first and if he has to let him play with a guitar pro of the rhythm track or something that usually makes it easier.
Than you guys record1 guy at a time. Rhythm and bass can be recording at the same time. Lead has to be recorded alone because he needs utter concentration on the tracks after they are 100% perfected to your standards. Singing is obviously the last thing you do. and do keyboard and stuff in a good VST supporting program unless you have an insane keyboard with great effects and such.

EDIT: also depnding on the quality of the studio recording and the sound of the drumset there is a program that over dubs your drum tracks with top notch samples of snares and such. You have to do this manually. I'll let you know what the program is when i remember its name
They're doing a live studio recording, so that won't work.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#20
Quote by GrisKy
pros don't do favors, they take on artists that they produce at their initial expense, but the idea is to shape them into something marketable so that everyone (mainly the producer) walks away with money... or SOMETHING to show for it.

who is this guy? your brother-in-law? I want a name.

the only time you go into a studio and track together is when you're looking for a baseline arrangement that your drummer can track to when you progress to individual tracking. I smell disaster, or at the very least some serious hours infront of pro tools.

this sounds in no way professional... but i'll give you the 'free' part, hard to beat that. you'll wind up with a fun demo to show your friends.


You're getting hostel for no reason. His name is Gary Gurniak and he worked at our old Jr. High, he's done this for probably half-a-dozen up and coming local bands. He's done sound at quite a few concerts and does lots of technical stuff for events such as the Olympics and NHL games, i guess he's not a professional producer, but he has a studio, he is skilled, and it's ****ing free.
Personally, I would prefer to record parts separately, but we don't want to push our luck when all we really want is just some recordings to use as a demo, give to our friends and put on our Myspace. We know that this has been successful because we've talked to other local bands (We live in Winnipeg, everyone knows everyone) who recorded with him using the exact same methods that we will be using. The recordings are pretty good quality and definitely usable.
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#21
Whoooooaaaa......

A high-end pro studio will often lay down bed tracks live off the floor with guitars and vocals in their own iso booths, etc. Some producers absolutely swear by it. Sure, they may well do overdubs later, but to say that no pro producer would record everything live at once is really uninformed.

Also, if a drum set is miked properly, you CAN do sound replacing with samples most of the time. There are a few factors that make this easier or harder, but with some judicious gating, etc., it's usually pretty achievable.

Metronomes are great. Just ask Mutt Lange. His style is to achieve perfection not otherwise possible even in a controlled studio environment, never mind live. On the other side, though, you have some of your more 'organic' types. Steve Albini who produced Nirvana's In Utero rarely uses a click. His take is that, if a drummer isn't otherwise dead comfortable playing with one, that the performance will suffer. Most of me agrees with him, though with some reservations.

My advice is to record yourselves with a ghetto blaster or get one of those Zoom H2 thingies. Record, evaluate, fix, repeat. You have to be critical, and you have to be committed to improving. That is the best way of getting tight.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#22
Quote by axemanchris
Whoooooaaaa......

A high-end pro studio will often lay down bed tracks live off the floor with guitars and vocals in their own iso booths, etc. Some producers absolutely swear by it. Sure, they may well do overdubs later, but to say that no pro producer would record everything live at once is really uninformed.

Also, if a drum set is miked properly, you CAN do sound replacing with samples most of the time. There are a few factors that make this easier or harder, but with some judicious gating, etc., it's usually pretty achievable.

Metronomes are great. Just ask Mutt Lange. His style is to achieve perfection not otherwise possible even in a controlled studio environment, never mind live. On the other side, though, you have some of your more 'organic' types. Steve Albini who produced Nirvana's In Utero rarely uses a click. His take is that, if a drummer isn't otherwise dead comfortable playing with one, that the performance will suffer. Most of me agrees with him, though with some reservations.

My advice is to record yourselves with a ghetto blaster or get one of those Zoom H2 thingies. Record, evaluate, fix, repeat. You have to be critical, and you have to be committed to improving. That is the best way of getting tight.

CT


Finally a smart reply, I was going to say something like your first paragraph, but I wasn't totally sure about it.
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#23
Quote by axemanchris
Whoooooaaaa......

A high-end pro studio will often lay down bed tracks live off the floor with guitars and vocals in their own iso booths, etc. Some producers absolutely swear by it. Sure, they may well do overdubs later, but to say that no pro producer would record everything live at once is really uninformed.

Metronomes are great. Just ask Mutt Lange. His style is to achieve perfection not otherwise possible even in a controlled studio environment, never mind live. On the other side, though, you have some of your more 'organic' types. Steve Albini who produced Nirvana's In Utero rarely uses a click. His take is that, if a drummer isn't otherwise dead comfortable playing with one, that the performance will suffer. Most of me agrees with him, though with some reservations.

CT


gotta disagree with you here. i'm not saying that a producer would never have the band record at the same time... i'm saying you'd never hear that on the final mix. in most cases, the only thing it'll be useful for is to give the drummer a track to play to besides a metronome. there'd have to be something very one-take, pasty cline-ish to hear a recording like that on the final mixdown. that approach started to be phased out in the 70's. show me a major release in the past decade with that, and i'll show you where it's not...

sounds to me like this guy who usta' work at your jr high wants to latch his name on to everyone's band in your area that he can in hopes of catching the early bus to "next big thing" town. can't really blame him, but that recording technique is not going to get you real studio mojo. "raw" and "energetic" are certainly things to strive for in a recording, but if he insists on recording the band at once, and you don't want to push it, could you maybe ask him to do a live recording of one of your shows? best of both worlds: you get high energy and a raw sound AND people will understand it's a live album so few people will be dicks about the quality (hell, even DIME made mistakes on "101 Proof"); he gets to say he recorded you. he'll probably use the word "produced," but whatever. so long as there's no paper trail (as in a production contract), that won't hurt you.
#24
Quote by GrisKy
could you maybe ask him to do a live recording of one of your shows? best of both worlds: you get high energy and a raw sound AND people will understand it's a live album so few people will be dicks about the quality (hell, even DIME made mistakes on "101 Proof"); he gets to say he recorded you. he'll probably use the word "produced," but whatever. so long as there's no paper trail (as in a production contract), that won't hurt you.

That's actually a great idea, but one of the reasons we wan recording is so people will at least know what we sound like before coming to our shows as we have nothing but one ****ty video of one of our songs on Facebook.
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#25
Quote by mtgold83
FYI. Ringo is known as the worst drummer to ever be allowed into the hall of fame.. and if you knew anything bout dear old ringo he wasnt originally planning to be a drummer his entire life... He kinda was just the friend that they didnt wanna kick out.


"Hey guys! I wrote a song!"

"That's great! You know what? I'll put it riiiight up on the fridge where everyone can see it."



"Yay!"


Sorry, I forgot I wasn't in the pit.

Now then, you'll want a click track. For everyone, not just the drummer. And practice with a click track for a good while before you actually go into the studio.
~don't finkdinkle when ur supposed to be dimpdickin~
#26
Quote by editthesadparts
That's actually a great idea, but one of the reasons we wan recording is so people will at least know what we sound like before coming to our shows as we have nothing but one ****ty video of one of our songs on Facebook.


hmmm... i see your problem, but i think it'd be worth it to sacrifice a small amount of promotion (what you'd get from passing around demos for a short period of time) for one show in order to get a good live recording.

just my opinion.
#27
Quote by GrisKy
there'd have to be something very one-take, pasty cline-ish to hear a recording like that on the final mixdown.


You would get that if you just used baffles or whatever to separate the instruements, yes. If you had proper iso booths.... You'd be fine, so long as you were happy with the take.

The production would be further fleshed out with more layers.

Because really, there would be absolutely no reason for there to be a difference in sound quality comparing a guitar tracked by itself as an overdub vs. tracked along with a whole band with the cabinet miked up in a proper iso booth. The one reservation on that comment is that iso booths tend to be small and dead sounding, so you couldn't compare that to bringing it out into an open spot on the hardwood floor portion of 'studio B' or whatever. In that respect, the difference is the room, not the technique or the time.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#28
Quote by axemanchris

Because really, there would be absolutely no reason for there to be a difference in sound quality comparing a guitar tracked by itself as an overdub vs. tracked along with a whole band with the cabinet miked up in a proper iso booth.


Unless of course the band hasn't practiced enough, and still "follow" each other around a song. The lack of eyesight between the members would result in crappy timing.

Obviously not a technical sound issue - but many people don't seem to realise what exactly is required to play a "tight" set.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#29
My band did the same thing. We got a guy who really knows his stuff, paid him $200 and spent a day live tracking some songs. We were all in the one room, facing each other, no click or anything, it turned out fairly well. The recordings definitely aren't anything we'd release but we ended up putting one of them on a cd we burned copies of and gave out at a gig.

The best thing you can possibly do is practice together as much as you can, which has already been said. Practice until everything becomes muscle memory and it will sound "tight."

The other thing you can do is practice individually with a metronome, all of you, not just the drummer. Decide together the speed of each of the songs and work on them until you all know exactly what they sound like at that speed.

Hope that helps! More than anything else we found live tracking a great way to hear how we sound live, and what's more we got a halfway decent recording out of it.
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#30
here's a question for you that I think will make my point better than me explaining it perhaps:

you're tracking the whole band, and man, that ryth gtr really nailed it in the first take!

...but the drums were off, and the bass was loose.

is the guitarist's day over? with the proper setup (which you don't have... neither does Abbey Road), the answer *could be* yes. if i had to guess, your best option in a case like that is to build a headphone mix, which is misleading, will kill much of the "live" vibe, and ultimately defeat the purpose of band tracking in the first place. It would also establish the guitar as the time keeping instrument, which is the wrong answer.

instead of making the best use of all of your bandmates' time, you'll all sit there until all of you have a perfect take, or you'll pay (well, maybe not pay in your specific case... but then again your engineer might just say **** it since he's working for free) through your teeth for time spent editing.

in a perfect world, this technique would be great and efficient, but outside of live contexts, it falls short.
#31
True enough, but it is quite typical to record the drums and bass together as keeper bed tracks and overdub the guitars and vocals later. What if the bass player has a perfect take and nobody else does? You do another one!

Really, all you need is a perfect drum take - even with a full 'live off the floor' recording. If a guitarist or bass player or singer mucks something up, those can be punched in, or edited in.

You're right, though.... you would NEVER use a guitar track as a time basis for the rest of the band to try to follow. I shudder even trying to imagine.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#32
i'll just repeat everyoneelse i guess. metronome.
i plan to drum along to a midi and click when i lay down the drum track for my bands recording. as i get lost without being able to hear a bass or other instrument, and forget where i am in a song.


P.S.
Axemanchris, which school do you teach at? i live right next to hamilton.
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#33
Quote by GrisKy
here's a question for you that I think will make my point better than me explaining it perhaps:

you're tracking the whole band, and man, that ryth gtr really nailed it in the first take!

...but the drums were off, and the bass was loose.

is the guitarist's day over? with the proper setup (which you don't have... neither does Abbey Road), the answer *could be* yes. if i had to guess, your best option in a case like that is to build a headphone mix, which is misleading, will kill much of the "live" vibe, and ultimately defeat the purpose of band tracking in the first place. It would also establish the guitar as the time keeping instrument, which is the wrong answer.

instead of making the best use of all of your bandmates' time, you'll all sit there until all of you have a perfect take, or you'll pay (well, maybe not pay in your specific case... but then again your engineer might just say **** it since he's working for free) through your teeth for time spent editing.

in a perfect world, this technique would be great and efficient, but outside of live contexts, it falls short.


We CAN do individual instrument recording if we want to do something like, say, a third guitar part or vocal over-dubbing, just not the entire thing. If that were to happen, we would take out that part and he would re-record on his own.
.
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#34
Quote by Mr.Cuddles

P.S.
Axemanchris, which school do you teach at? i live right next to hamilton.


Huntington Park, near Fennel + Upper Ottawa. Great school!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#35
Quote by axemanchris
True enough, but it is quite typical to record the drums and bass together as keeper bed tracks and overdub the guitars and vocals later. What if the bass player has a perfect take and nobody else does? You do another one!

Really, all you need is a perfect drum take - even with a full 'live off the floor' recording. If a guitarist or bass player or singer mucks something up, those can be punched in, or edited in.

You're right, though.... you would NEVER use a guitar track as a time basis for the rest of the band to try to follow. I shudder even trying to imagine.

CT


I agree, but I think I'm failing to be clear in my statements. You certainly CAN track everyone at once, but like you said, what you need is that perfecct drum take. Everything builds on that. So, the whole band can "record" together until the drums are perfect, then his day is done... bassist steps in and tracks according to the drums, then his day is done, and so forth (and in some cases it helps to bus these two instruments together... not sure if tht's what you meant before).

every producer's got his own way of doing things, and there really is no wrong answer if the sound is right. That said, the only time you'll get a better sound out of group tracking rather than with an overdub is when something that can't be replicated happens... and you don't want to be the guy sitting in the control room saying "that was great guys, now let me arm the tracks and lets do it once more."
#36
Quote by GrisKy


sounds to me like this guy who usta' work at your jr high wants to latch his name on to everyone's band in your area that he can in hopes of catching the early bus to "next big thing" town. can't really blame him, but that recording technique is not going to get you real studio mojo. "raw" and "energetic" are certainly things to strive for in a recording, but if he insists on recording the band at once, and you don't want to push it, could you maybe ask him to do a live recording of one of your shows? best of both worlds: you get high energy and a raw sound AND people will understand it's a live album so few people will be dicks about the quality (hell, even DIME made mistakes on "101 Proof"); he gets to say he recorded you. he'll probably use the word "produced," but whatever. so long as there's no paper trail (as in a production contract), that won't hurt you.


Maybe he's just a nice guy? Maybe he actually ENJOYS doing stuff related to music? Maybe he really digs their band? Maybe he wants to help the music scene in his area? I mean, I don't get why everyone is trying to say that the guy who's gonna be recording a band for free has bad intentions.

Just because you wouldn't be willing to do anything for anyone dosen't mean every single person in this world is a dick. I'm not targetting you, I'm just talking about everyone in this thread who's saying the guy sounds sketchy.

Now for the guy who started the thread, when it comes to being tight, just practice as much as possible. Record your band practices with any ****ty recording devices you have access too and work on whatever leaves you unsatisfied. When it comes down to it, it's all about whether or not everyone knows their parts inside and out, and if you guys can make it work as a whole.

If your band is good, it'll sound great. Sure it won't sound like a professional product you could have on the shelves of a store, but for a first demo, it'll be perfect. Hell, even if the recording quality is ****, you won't have paid anything for it, you have nothing to lose.

Good luck
Last edited by intentionsthere at Sep 26, 2009,
#37
Quote by intentionsthere
Maybe he's just a nice guy? Maybe he actually ENJOYS doing stuff related to music? Maybe he really digs their band? Maybe he wants to help the music scene in his area? I mean, I don't get why everyone is trying to say that the guy who's gonna be recording a band for free has bad intentions.

Just because you wouldn't be willing to do anything for anyone dosen't mean every single person in this world is a dick. I'm not targetting you, I'm just talking about everyone in this thread who's saying the guy sounds sketchy.

Now for the guy who started the thread, when it comes to being tight, just practice as much as possible. Record your band practices with any ****ty recording devices you have access too and work on whatever leaves you unsatisfied. When it comes down to it, it's all about whether or not everyone knows their parts inside and out, and if you guys can make it work as a whole.

If your band is good, it'll sound great. Sure it won't sound like a professional product you could have on the shelves of a store, but for a first demo, it'll be perfect. Hell, even if the recording quality is ****, you won't have paid anything for it, you have nothing to lose.

Good luck


He is, we've talked to him and he just wants to help us, I don't get all the negativity.
_____________________________________________________
"Everyone's life ends, but no one ever completes it."
#38
I live by the motto "expect the best, but prepare for the worst."

just trying to make sure ETSP doesn't get run over by this guy is all... and this engineer's previous actions, like doing this same "favor" for lots of bands in his area, sets off my spider sense.

...and I have no faith in human nature to be good in any way.
#39
There are three good reasons for recording live multitrack:

It is quick and cheap and makes good use of spare studio time

If you never play to a metronome it is easier for less experienced musicians

It gives songs a live feel.


The reasons for not doing it are all above; it is mainly about recording each instrument without background noise from the rest of the band and the ability to retake individual parts.

Being tight is really about practice, how much and how you do it. So squeeze in as much as you can and be grateful for the help you are getting. Buy the guy a drink and have fun
#40
Quote by GrisKy
what the **** kind of a producer/engineer thinks recording all of you together is the best idea?


you do realise that some really, really good records have been tracked live, right? and that even those that weren't probably started off that way; ie, everything was tracked together and then overdubbed as necessary.

its pretty idiotic to spout off about this when the reality is that tracking live is not an unusual thing to do.

anyway, to the threadstarter, i'd actually suggest that a good exercise would be to do a basic recording of yourselves. you probably have the gear to be able to just stick a mic in the middle of the room and record yourselves playing. listen to this, and use it to improve what you're playing. you'll notice little things that just don't work that you probably wouldn't have otherwise. then, you can make sure that your songs are working when you do go into the studio.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
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