#1
i started playing the guitar about a year ago but have been using classical .
i thought of buying an electric one .
but there's one question and i really need to know the answer .
DOes the type of guitar affect the style of music you play ?
i mean i thought of buyin' and Ibanez .
i listen to like slipknot and stuff .
but i wanna play stuff like sweet child o' mine ...
will it sound the same on a les paul as on an Ibanez ?
Maybe guitars ain't my thing . I'll try the cello .
#2
I've played blues and indie on an Ibanez. An S series as well, which is a metal guitar.

I've also played metal on an SSS Ash Strat with warm low output Alnico II pickups.

So, no. A guitar is just a tool. How you use it is up to you.
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#4
There's nothing stopping you from playing any genre on any guitar. You can play death metal on a big old Gibson ES-135 and you can play blues on a B.C.Rich Warlock if you really wanted to. Of course they'll sound different and may in fact sound completely inappropriate, but it's not like they're completely different instruments or anything.

However if you are after a specific tone, you will need a guitar that is at least roughly in the right ballpark, as well as an appropriate amplifier. You can't get the Sweet Child O' Mine tone (mahogany Les Paul, humbucker pickups, Marshall valve amp) if you're using an ESP super-Strat made of ash with single coil pickups through a Fender solid state amp. On the other hand, a Gibson SG through an Orange valve amplifier could still get close to the tone of the LP/Marshall vlave amp, as they're all very similar.


So... yeah. you can technically play anything on anything, but whether it will actually sound as good as it should or not is another matter.




If you're looking for something that can do both classic rock and basic metal tones, things you should look for in a guitar are:
- A solid mahogany body.
- Two humbucker pickups.
- A 24 fret neck may seem preferable for metal, but for classic and hard rock - especially things like the Sweet Child O' Mine tone - having 24 frets means the neck pickup is moved further back, which changes the tone of the neck pickup slightly. So if metal is ore important to you look for 24 frets, if classic/hard rock neck pickup tones are more important you should look for a guitar with 22 frets.
- A rosewood fretboard, especially if the guitar you end up getting has a bolt-on neck.

Also, do not fall for the marketting trap that a paper-thin neck and huge frets = faster playing. Someone who cna't play quickly on a Fender Strat neck, for example, won't magically play superbly on an Ibanez neck. Someone who plays well on an Ibanez neck can probably play equally as well on the neck of a Gibson SG. The trick is to find the neck that's most comfortable for you, which if you've already been playing classical guitar for a while, will probably be something a little thicker than an Ibanez neck. I would strongly suggest you look into ESP, Schecter, Epiphone Prophecy and some Fender guitars, as their necks are still all very slim but will be slightly thicker than Ibanez necks, which you will probably find more comfortable and familiar if you've been playing classical guitar for a while.
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#5
I have a Squier fat strat and i play everything to death metal on it -shrug-
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#8
Quote by Simsimius
I've played blues and indie on an Ibanez. An S series as well, which is a metal guitar.

I've also played metal on an SSS Ash Strat with warm low output Alnico II pickups.

So, no. A guitar is just a tool. How you use it is up to you.


But different guitars will sound different, and some guitars will give you more of the "standard" *insert genre here* sound.
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#9
Not the guitar effects what you play, your playing effects what guitar you buy.
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#10
Yeah, It affects your overall feel and style. Of course you can play the same song on fifty different guitars, It's just that one guitar may call to you more than another and if you aren't content with the guitar then it will affect your playing.
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#11
Quote by biga29
But different guitars will sound different, and some guitars will give you more of the "standard" *insert genre here* sound.


Oh, of course.
It's best to buy an instrument that is best suited to the sound you want.
knowing full well you're going to solely play Country, then buying a B.C.Rich Warlock with EMGs, is clearly a bad move.
But, a certain [type of] guitar is by no means a limiting factor in what you play.
Using the warlock example again; you can still play country on it.

I can play metal on my Strat. Do I? Not really, it's best suited to wonderful cleans and a bluesy 'crunch', and that's what I mainly use it for. But it can easily be used for metal, or even classical.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
Last edited by Simsimius at Sep 24, 2009,
#12
Guitars wont affect the sound really thats the pickups and amps job
Although u would look a bit odd with a Warlock or something playing blues
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#13
i think it's the other way around. the styles of music you play will determine what types of guitars you look at, or maybe what your list of features would be for your ultimate guitar.

for example; i like bigger necks, p90's for cleans, humbuckers for leads, and hardtails. the gibson BFG is perfect for me. i'd prefer a 25.5" scale, but sacrifices have to be made.
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#14
Quote by MrFlibble
There's nothing stopping you from playing any genre on any guitar. You can play death metal on a big old Gibson ES-135 and you can play blues on a B.C.Rich Warlock if you really wanted to. Of course they'll sound different and may in fact sound completely inappropriate, but it's not like they're completely different instruments or anything.

However if you are after a specific tone, you will need a guitar that is at least roughly in the right ballpark, as well as an appropriate amplifier. You can't get the Sweet Child O' Mine tone (mahogany Les Paul, humbucker pickups, Marshall valve amp) if you're using an ESP super-Strat made of ash with single coil pickups through a Fender solid state amp. On the other hand, a Gibson SG through an Orange valve amplifier could still get close to the tone of the LP/Marshall vlave amp, as they're all very similar.


So... yeah. you can technically play anything on anything, but whether it will actually sound as good as it should or not is another matter.



agreed
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#15
I play metal on my Strat...
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#16
Any guitar you buy will set a kind of boundary within which it and you are able to work together comfortably. Of my guitars, the Cort (mahogany body, EMGs, 24 fret, Floyd Rose) is the most versatile. I have an electric 12 string for the jangly and folksy stuff but it is quite happy with blues (except bends) and even ventures into metal rhythm work. I also use an electro acoustic and my next purchase will be a Les Paul. These will cover all the bases I need as I have views about country.
When it comes to composing is where you really notice the differences. I'm hardly going to write a stunning shred intro on the 12, or some heavy power chord stuff on an acoustic. So the mood of the song I want to create will steer my hand towards one guitar rather than maybe my favourite.
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#17
thanks for the replies guys .
i'll definitely try as many guitars as i can .
Maybe guitars ain't my thing . I'll try the cello .
#18
Id buy a guitar that fits alot of genres both sound and style wise.

Id say stay away from Floyd Rose and EMG pickups, Floyd Rose = Takes alot of time to tune and get right and (IMO) the EMG pickups (the actives) really lack character for anything else then high gain stuff.

Go for the guitar that feels the best in YOUR hand and sounds the best to YOUR ear.
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#19
Quote by riflesndaisies
Guitars wont affect the sound really thats the pickups and amps job
Although u would look a bit odd with a Warlock or something playing blues


Wrong, Pickups and amps have their place but you can't get a Les Paul's sound out of a Stratocaster just by switching the pickups. There is a lot more to a guitar than you think. Every little thing contributes to the final sound and feel. The bridge for example is a big part of the final tone but far from the only part.
Always tin your strings.

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Don't be afraid to be honest.
#20
There is also an argument to buy the guitar that turns you on the most..if it makes you want to pick it up and play it then the rest will follow.
#21
Quote by thrench
There is also an argument to buy the guitar that turns you on the most..if it makes you want to pick it up and play it then the rest will follow.


i think this is really true. especially for beginners. there will always be an argument for the "guitar that feels / sounds the best will be the best" and thats theoretically true. but if you never pick it up it might as well be an accordion or a kazoo. make sure you like the looks and feel both. nobody likes an ugly and uncomfortable guitar.
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