#1
I've been writing songs for a year, and I've composed some really badass chord progressions (I guess patience paid off with experience )

The instrumental parts literally reek with melody and emotion, but I can't write a single voice line or melody. I've listened to bands that are more voice-centered like Green Day and My Chemical Romance, but I'm still confused.

Does anyone knows any good ways to compose melodies that compliment the arpeggios and chord proggressions I write?

ANY help would be greatly appreciated guys! Thank you.
Last edited by ingames at Sep 24, 2009,
#2
try and hum a melody along with the song - if you can hum a melody you have your vocal line - at first they might not be very good, but over time you'll improve and humm better melodies
#3
Problem is mate, I get too caught up in the melody of how the chords resolve with each other.

I always think of something very similar to the melody already made by the guitars behind instead of something original. :S
#4
Quote by ingames
Problem is mate, I get too caught up in the melody of how the chords resolve with each other.

I always think of something very similar to the melody already made by the guitars behind instead of something original. :S

try harmonizing your voice over a guitar harmony you already have,, like singing perfectly along with your lead or whatever
#5
my take...use chord voicings that match the melody note....this may force you to move the melody up an octave in many cases

the study of harmony and moving voices is very worthwhile if you are going to pursue music with this type of harmonic device...Bach corals are a good place to start...to see the dynamic effect of this.

example key of C

the melody line is in the lower register with melody notes E F G A .. all half notes..moving the melody up an octave will permit you to use some type of C Maj or MA6, 7 ,9 voicing with the E as the top note...the next chord may be a C suspended type with F as the top note...a C7 type chord for the G as the type note and perhaps an F Maj/Maj7 type for the A note on top..

if you apply this thinking to include substitutions and back cycling your chord choices increase tremendously...and the harmonic interplay with the melody can get very intresting

these concepts are worth studying and will increase your enjoyment of creating and playing music

play well

wolf
#6
Quote by ingames
Problem is mate, I get too caught up in the melody of how the chords resolve with each other.

I always think of something very similar to the melody already made by the guitars behind instead of something original. :S


If you already have a lot of harmonies it can be hard to make a melody because it's too cluttered, if you have a number of guitar parts try dropping one and making it into a vocal line. Just cos you wrote it on/for guitar doesn't mean it has to stay there.