#1
what are the harmonic overtones starting on C or what is the formula to find out what all the harmonic overtones are? (all the notes that are present but are barely audible when a note is played. presence or lack of overtones is what creates tone) I need to know for a music test tomorrow.
#2
It's a lydian dominant scale... 1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7
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#3
Harmonic 1 = 440 (2) = 880 = Perfect 8ve (1)
Harmonic 2 = 440 (3) = 1320 = Perfect 12th (5)
Harmonic 3 = 440 (4) = 1760 = Perfect 15th (1)
Harmonic 4 = 440 (5) = 2200 = Major 17th (3)
Harmonic 5 = 440 (6) = 2640 = Perfect 19th (5)
Harmonic 6 = 440 (7) = 3080 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 20th (db 7)
Harmonic 7 = 440 (8) = 3520 = Perfect 22nd (1)
Harmonic 8 = 440 (9) = 3960 = Major 23rd (2)
Harmonic 9 = 440 (10) = 4400 = Major 24th (3)
Harmonic 10 = 440 (11) = 4840 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 26th (db 5)
Harmonic 11 = 440 (12) = 5280 = Perfect 26th (5)
Harmonic 12 = 440 (13) = 5720 = Quarter tone flat of Major 27th (d 6)
Harmonic 13 = 440 (14) = 6160 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 28th (db 7)
Harmonic 14 = 440 (15) = 6600 = Major 28th (7)
Harmonic 15 = 440 (16) = 7040 = Perfect 29th (8)
Harmonic 16 = 440 (17) = 7480 = Quarter tone flat of major 30th (d 2)
Harmonic 17 = 440 (18) = 7920 = Major 30th (2)
Harmonic 18 = 440 (19) = 8360 = Minor 31st = (b3)
Harmonic 19 = 440 (20) = 8800 = Major 31st = (3)
Harmonic 20 = 440 (21) = 9240 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 32nd (d 4)
Harmonic 21 = 440 (22) = 9680 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 33rd (db 5)
Harmonic 22 = 440 (23) = 10120 = Diminished 33rd (b 5)
Harmonic 23 = 440 (24) = 10560 = Perfect 33rd (5)
Harmonic 24 = 440 (25) = 11000 = Quarter tone flat of minor 34th (db 6)
Harmonic 25 = 440 (26) = 11440 = Quarter tone flat of major 34th (d 6)
Harmonic 26 = 440 (27) = 11880 = Major 34th (6)
Harmonic 27 = 440 (28) = 12320 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 35th (db 7)
Harmonic 28 = 440 (29) = 12760 = Minor 35th (b 7)
Harmonic 29 = 440 (30) = 13200 = Major 35th (7)
Harmonic 30 = 440 (31) = 13640 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 36th (d 8)
Harmonic 31 = 440 (32) = 14080 = Perfect 36th (1)
#4
it depends on what insturment you are playing - the reason different instruments sound different (even different guitars) is because of the strength and number of overtones present.

the most common ones are direct multiples of the frequency of the note you play though. (e.g. octave = double frequency, 5th = triple) to find all of them you need to anaylse the sound wave quite carefully

isaac - where'd you get that list from? EDIT: stupid question

ramm ty = where'd you get that scale from?
#5
Isaac, that's possibly the sexiest post I've ever seen.

OP: That list is a great reference for the theory of overtones in equal temperament, but if you are generating tones with oscillators and want a more 'natural' sound from the harmonies, then you might want to read up on pseudo-octaves and twelve-tone temperament.
Quote by nightwind
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#6
i've just seen the OP properly

basically to find overtones -
frequency*n = overtone frequency
where n= overtone number (e.g. octave = 1)
#7
Quote by isaac_bandits
Harmonic 1 = 440 (2) = 880 = Perfect 8ve (1)
Harmonic 2 = 440 (3) = 1320 = Perfect 12th (5)
Harmonic 3 = 440 (4) = 1760 = Perfect 15th (1)
Harmonic 4 = 440 (5) = 2200 = Major 17th (3)
Harmonic 5 = 440 (6) = 2640 = Perfect 19th (5)
Harmonic 6 = 440 (7) = 3080 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 20th (db 7)
Harmonic 7 = 440 (8) = 3520 = Perfect 22nd (1)
Harmonic 8 = 440 (9) = 3960 = Major 23rd (2)
Harmonic 9 = 440 (10) = 4400 = Major 24th (3)
Harmonic 10 = 440 (11) = 4840 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 26th (db 5)
Harmonic 11 = 440 (12) = 5280 = Perfect 26th (5)
Harmonic 12 = 440 (13) = 5720 = Quarter tone flat of Major 27th (d 6)
Harmonic 13 = 440 (14) = 6160 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 28th (db 7)
Harmonic 14 = 440 (15) = 6600 = Major 28th (7)
Harmonic 15 = 440 (16) = 7040 = Perfect 29th (8)
Harmonic 16 = 440 (17) = 7480 = Quarter tone flat of major 30th (d 2)
Harmonic 17 = 440 (18) = 7920 = Major 30th (2)
Harmonic 18 = 440 (19) = 8360 = Minor 31st = (b3)
Harmonic 19 = 440 (20) = 8800 = Major 31st = (3)
Harmonic 20 = 440 (21) = 9240 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 32nd (d 4)
Harmonic 21 = 440 (22) = 9680 = Quarter tone flat of Diminished 33rd (db 5)
Harmonic 22 = 440 (23) = 10120 = Diminished 33rd (b 5)
Harmonic 23 = 440 (24) = 10560 = Perfect 33rd (5)
Harmonic 24 = 440 (25) = 11000 = Quarter tone flat of minor 34th (db 6)
Harmonic 25 = 440 (26) = 11440 = Quarter tone flat of major 34th (d 6)
Harmonic 26 = 440 (27) = 11880 = Major 34th (6)
Harmonic 27 = 440 (28) = 12320 = Quarter tone flat of Minor 35th (db 7)
Harmonic 28 = 440 (29) = 12760 = Minor 35th (b 7)
Harmonic 29 = 440 (30) = 13200 = Major 35th (7)
Harmonic 30 = 440 (31) = 13640 = Quarter tone flat of Perfect 36th (d 8)
Harmonic 31 = 440 (32) = 14080 = Perfect 36th (1)


haha. post of all posts. thanks man. also thanks to everyone else who posted.
#8
Quote by doive

isaac - where'd you get that list from? EDIT: stupid question



I made it one day when I was bored. You've shown further down how to get the pitch of a harmonic, and then all you need is to know how to convert pitch to semitones using f(x) = a(2)^(x/12) where f(x) is a function of x giving the frequency of the second pitch, a is the frequency of the first pitch, and x is the number of semitones that the second note is above the first. After making that list I saved it, so whenever this question comes up, I have an easy, useful, copy-and-paste post ready.
#9
Quote by isaac_bandits
I made it one day when I was bored. You've shown further down how to get the pitch of a harmonic, and then all you need is to know how to convert pitch to semitones using f(x) = a(2)^(x/12) where f(x) is a function of x giving the frequency of the second pitch, a is the frequency of the first pitch, and x is the number of semitones that the second note is above the first. After making that list I saved it, so whenever this question comes up, I have an easy, useful, copy-and-paste post ready.

You must teach me your ways.
I think it's time for a change.



Sig v5.0 (approximate)
#10
isaacs list is winner, but here's from C if you want to save some time

C C(8va) G C E G Bb C(8va) D E F# G Ab Bb B C(8va)

this is the way i memorised it in school when they taught us but i think i remembered correctly
#11
Quote by isaac_bandits
Harmonic 1 = 440 (2) = 880 = Perfect 8ve (1)
Harmonic 2 = 440 (3) = 1320 = Perfect 12th (5)
Harmonic 3 = 440 (4) = 1760 = Perfect 15th (1)
...


Actually, the first harmonic is the fundamental, not the octave, so your list should have started...

Harmonic 1 = 440 (1) = 440 = Unison (1)
Harmonic 2 = 440 (2) = 880 = Perfect 8ve (1)
Harmonic 3 = 440 (3) = 1320 = Perfect 12th (5)
etc...


Since we're comparing intervals, it's unnecessary to include the factor of 440. We only need the harmonic number itself (since it applies to any tuning reference).

First harmonic: 0.000; P1
Second harmonic: {1.000 octave}
Third harmonic: 1.585; P12 (P5)
Fourth harmonic: 2.000; P15
Fifth harmonic: 2.322; M17 (M3)
Sixth harmonic: 2.585; P19 (P5)
Seventh harmonic: 2.807; subminor21 (subminor7)
Eighth harmonic: 3.000; P22
Ninth harmonic: 3.170; M23 (M2)
Tenth harmonic: 3.322; M24 (M3)
Eleventh harmonic: 3.459; P25 < 11:1 < aug25 (P4 < 11:1 < aug4)
Twelfth harmonic: 3.585; P26 (P5)
Thirteenth harmonic: 3.700; m27 < 13:1 (m6 < 13:1)
Fourteenth harmonic: 3.807; subminor28 (subminor7)
Fifteenth harmonic: 3.906; M28 (M7)
Sixteenth harmonic: 4.000; P29
Last edited by Dodeka at Sep 26, 2009,
#12
Actually, the first harmonic is the fundamental, not the octave, so your list should have started...

Harmonic 1 = 440 (1) = 440 = Unison (1)
Harmonic 2 = 440 (2) = 880 = Perfect 8ve (1)
Harmonic 3 = 440 (3) = 1320 = Perfect 12th (5)
etc...I don't know. I always thought the fundamental was the fundamental and the first harmonic was the first harmonic above the fundamental.

So the fundamental = 1 and the first harmonic = 1/2

EDIT: Well I looked at wiki and it agrees with you the harmonic series includes the fundamental. So there you go.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Sep 26, 2009,
#13
Quote by 20Tigers
I don't know. I always thought the fundamental was the fundamental and the first harmonic was the first harmonic above the fundamental.

So the fundamental = 1 and the first harmonic = 1/2

EDIT: Well I looked at wiki and it agrees with you the harmonic series includes the fundamental. So there you go.


Yeah; the second harmonic is the first overtone. Multiplying by one is pretty trivial, so I can see why it seems pointless to consider the fundamental the first harmonic, but at at least you don't have to add one to get the frequency ratio (harmonic 1 is 1:1, harmonic 2 is 2:1, etc.).
#14
Quote by Dodeka
Yeah; the second harmonic is the first overtone. Multiplying by one is pretty trivial, so I can see why it seems pointless to consider the fundamental the first harmonic, but at at least you don't have to add one to get the frequency ratio (harmonic 1 is 1:1, harmonic 2 is 2:1, etc.).


So I could've just said Xth overtone and all of it would be correct instead of displaced by one. And using the frequency of 440 just happened, because, way back when when I first made that list, someone was asking for them based on A, so I ended up making that and saving it. I can't be bothered anymore to generalize it.