#1
I've got my first quiz in my Japanese 101 class tomorrow (third day of class and already a quiz lol), and I have to memorize the first 15 Hiragana (Japanese characters) and their corresponding sounds. Basically, the instructor is going to say the sound of the character, and the students have to write down the hiragana.
I'm attempting to study for this now, but I'm having issues studying for it. I don't know HOW you would study a foreign language.

Anyone have any tips?

Inb4 "Get of teh UGz! I just logged on to ask this question.
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#3
Just memorise it. Only 15, easy. Write it down, then try to write without looking.
You play guitar right? 15 hiragana is nothing to 300 notes per song
Been in Japan since August, no fucking money left!
#6
www.alljapaneseallthetime.com

read the articles.


Or, most likely, consult my friend here.

Learning Japanese FAQ:

Should I learn Japanese?
-No.

Why not?
-Well, most people will tell you that Japanese is the hardest language to learn, and, in short, they're right. While linguists will tell you that any language is as hard to learn as any other, in general there are many 'x' factors that make Japanese inanely difficult.
*The writing system requires about two years of study to be able to even begin reading
*Japanese textbooks are notoriously awful
*The multiple levels of politeness in Japanese prevent the beginner from understanding even everyday conversation for a long time
*Japanese people are very shy and unlikely to talk to you unless you've done considerable amount of study or have the gall to chase them down and force them to talk to you
*There's no real use to learning Japanese aside from translation or teaching English in Japan, both of which can be terrible, terrible decisions

I don't care, I still love Japan and MUST learn Japanese!
-Assuming you do start taking Japanese, you will probably be the first to wash out after about a month of being hammered down by 3 alphabets and grammatical structures completely abstract to the native English speaker. Japanophiles are fodder for the psychological meat grinder that is this awful, awful language.

I'm a masochist with no want or need of future employment.
-Japanese is the perfect focus for you. Also consider Law School for the perfect combination of endless studying combined with abyssmal future employment prospects.

Ok, I've decided, I'm learning Japanese!
-I'm truly sorry for you. Buy a heavybag, and paint on "Japanese" on it in big bold letters so that you can safely and healthily let the pain out.

What textbook should I buy?
-The standard is "Genki," but in all seriousness you should probably learn the basic grammatical structures and the first 100 words that they recommend you learn, and then after that light your textbook on fire and never look back. Textbooks will only teach you the Japanese that Japan wants you to know, and almost nothing of the Japanese that's actually used daily. Actually, I will admit that Japanese people really do say "it's cold, it's cold" or "it's hot, it's hot" constantly depending on the weather. Aside from that however, I'd almost recommend buying some really good references for translating and then just go ahead and start hollistically studying via translating newspapers and television dramas.


Still, if you must persevere, then you better damn well focus 100% on it. Read the articles from that site. All of them.
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Last edited by Night_Lights at Sep 24, 2009,
#7
Quote by SGstriker
I've got my first quiz in my Japanese 101 class tomorrow (third day of class and already a quiz lol), and I have to memorize the first 15 Hiragana (Japanese characters) and their corresponding sounds. Basically, the instructor is going to say the sound of the character, and the students have to write down the hiragana.
I'm attempting to study for this now, but I'm having issues studying for it. I don't know HOW you would study a foreign language.

Anyone have any tips?

Inb4 "Get of teh UGz! I just logged on to ask this question.



Just memorize them. It's 15 characters, it can't be hard in any way unless you have a learning disability.
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#8
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#9
I just started my first year of Japanese too.

It's really not that difficult at this point. We have workbooks and have been writing in them often so everyone's pretty much already memorized the letters.
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#10
Hey man, I did Japanese for ten years and memorisation is pretty much the best way to go. There are some tricks for the simpler characters though - creating a mental connection between the sound and the picture.



a - kinda looks like an antenna, kinda sounds like antenna
i - kinda looks like to Is, kinda sounds like Hawaii
u - ...ok I was always told this looked like an old lady being hit by a brick, and "ooh" was the sound she made.
e - I have no idea how I remembered this one. Oh wait, yeah I do. Emily is a fast runner. See? Kinda looks like a chick running?
o - looks like the putting green of a golf course.

[By the way, all these words work with an Australian accent, but you might pronounce the o from golf differently to me and so it might not sounds like the Japanese o.]

So yeah, when your teacher says "a", you can be like "Antenna! The squiggly one! Yeah!" and your test will be printed on win.
Last edited by Cholas at Sep 24, 2009,
#11
Quote by Cholas
Hey man, I did Japanese for ten years and memorisation is pretty much the best way to go. There are some tricks for the simpler characters though - creating a mental connection between the sound and the picture.



a - kinda looks like an antenna, kinda sounds like antenna
i - kinda looks like to Is, kinda sounds like Hawaii
u - ...ok I was always told this looked like an old lady being hit by a brick, and "ooh" was the sound she made.
e - I have no idea how I remembered this one. Oh wait, yeah I do. Emily is a fast runner. See? Kinda looks like a chick running?
o - looks like the putting green of a golf course.

[By the way, all these words work with an Australian accent, but you might pronounce the o from golf differently to me and so it might not sounds like the Japanese o.]

So yeah, when your teacher says "a", you can be like "Antenna! The squiggly one! Yeah!" and your test will be printed on win.

This one's actually pretty good.

I learned Japanese before English; the way I memorized the damn letters was to pronounce them while writing them.
#12
Don't know if that guy will come back or if he likes my system, but in case he wants it later and I'm not around...

ka - someone bending over about to be whipped and they'll get cut
ki - a bunch of keys
ku - the beak of a kookaburra [...that's an Australian bird, if anyone was unsure]
ke - someone using one arm to hold a beer keg
ko - a copper coin


sa - a samurai sword cutting through the air
shi - she has long hair
su - kinda looks like a seed underground that will grow soon
se - two lovers about to embrace at sunset
so - some crazy tangled material coming out of a sewing machine


Good luck for your test.
#13
Quote by Night_Lights
www.alljapaneseallthetime.com

read the articles.


Or, most likely, consult my friend here.


Still, if you must persevere, then you better damn well focus 100% on it. Read the articles from that site. All of them.


Arabic is actually more often considered to be the hardest language for an English speaker to learn.
#14
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#16
Complete and total immersion is the best way to learn a language. I lived in Japan for a year and I spoke no Japanese before moving there other than Konichiwa and Sayonara lol. I was pretty much fluent after about 6 months. Just move to Japan bro
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Last edited by Wylde_Guitarist at Sep 24, 2009,