#1
I know all of the open chords, and I can change between them quickly but what else can i do to spice up a chord progression. I know you can do more than just a strumming pattern and switching chords.
#2
you can arpeggiate chords, you can make riffs from chord shape apply different flavors to your chords like sus chords/add chords

but basically chordal knowledge is key to layer different instruments over the top and creating riffs
#3
Quote by Martindecorum
you can arpeggiate chords, you can make riffs from chord shape apply different flavors to your chords like sus chords/add chords

but basically chordal knowledge is key to layer different instruments over the top and creating riffs

Thanks
#4
Learn about chord construction and build more chords that you like the sound of in different places on the neck.
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#6
Try different positions on the neck to play the chords. You can pick up a Picture-chord book for like $10 at the music store or Target, etc. This will open up different tones for your chords and add some flexibility to some chord progressions.

2 Techniques that might spice up the chord progressions:
A) Mute a string or two to give it a more percussive sound
B) Try this E Chord;

e - Open
B - Open
G - 9
D - 9
A - 7
E - X

You can do many chords with the [e & B] strings muted. Here's a song that will help you out, they use many chords like the E I just showed:

"But Honestly" - Foo Fighters
"But Honestly" Tab

I hope this helps you out a little bit!
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
Voice leading


This. You should be looking at the guitarists who are known for their chordal or rhythm work.

Most notable would be Hendrix and Frusc. You can also apply larger intervals in the chords and different voicings that occur in Jazz and Fusion.
#9
Quote by bagamush
I know all of the open chords, and I can change between them quickly but what else can i do to spice up a chord progression. I know you can do more than just a strumming pattern and switching chords.

Apart from all the entirely correct and definately worth doing "learn more chords then, and if possible how to build* them" answers, and just sticking with open chords, try these...

Try throwing in some partial chords, by which I mean don't hit all of the strings. For example, open high E plus B fretted at the second fret still works as open A major, and open D and G strings will still work for you where you'd play a G major chord. This, in my opinion, can actually sound remarkably good if you try it in a deliberately sloppy way, and can lead on to other ideas.

Also...

Try a bit of left hand muting. Yes, it's (in theory) relatively devoid of pitch, but the percussive muted sound can, with an interesting rhythm, be combined with even just one open chord to produce something that sounds pretty cool.

Also...

Oh, it's late and I've been working all day... anyone want to come up with a decent answer regarding chord substitution? My knowlege on this one goes as far as "stuff that sticks with the root plus the perfect tones lends itself to substituting the IV of the chord (if you take said chord as the root) pretty well", and is therefore both incomplete and really, really badly expressed.

* Do this. Definately, do this. I've only been at this a year or so, but it's actually stunningly simple once you get your head around it, and the results are remarkably cool.
Oh, now I've gone and spilled my tea. This really won't do at all.