#1
Can someone explain to me the advantages of having an amp with an FX loop? What is an effects loop exactly?

I wanna make sure my knowledge of pedals is somewhat consolidated before I go off and buy a couple.

Thanks
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#2
An effects loop allows you to use effects between the preamp and poweramp, versus just the preamp if you don't have an effects loop. Certain effects tend to sound or work better in front of the poweramp rather than in front of the preamp. It would also allow for slaving different preamps into your poweramp.

Take for example a noise supressor. If you put it in front of the amp it will only stop noise from the guitar and effects. If you place it last in your effects loop, it will also stop noise added by your preamp.
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Last edited by Mark G at Sep 25, 2009,
#3
An effects loop is used to plug your effects into your amp without using the guitar input with minimal tone coloration. If you plug pedals directly into the input of the amp, it tends to suck tone. So effects loops are great youll really hear the difference once experiment with it more.
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#4
Thanks for the help. I think I sort of get the idea. I read in an ehow article that you only really should run modulation and time-based effects through the FX loop e.g. delay, chorus and flanger, and keep the OD or distortion pedals in the usual circuit.
Fender 1996 Floyd Rose Standard Stratocaster
Epiphone SG G-400

Laney TT50-112

Ibanez Weeping Demon
Marshall RG-1 Regenerator
Electro-Harmonix/Sovtek (Black) Big Muff Pi

Visit my site for some FREE RE-AMPING! http://www.wix.com/reamps/reamp
#5
Quote by HellBoy9393
Thanks for the help. I think I sort of get the idea. I read in an ehow article that you only really should run modulation and time-based effects through the FX loop e.g. delay, chorus and flanger, and keep the OD or distortion pedals in the usual circuit.


Noise supressors would also generally go in the effects loop.
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#6
Mod, delay, and reverb sound best when placed after distortion. Since distortion often comes from the amp's preamp, the place for these FX is in the loop. Without a loop there is no way to place FX after the amp's distortion. With no loop it's best to use a clean amp and get your distortion from pedals, while placing FX pedals after distortion pedals.
#7
SO would you all say having an FX loop in the amp is a significant advantage over having an amp without one? Could just drop the hammer on getting an HT-5 later this year.
Fender 1996 Floyd Rose Standard Stratocaster
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Ibanez Weeping Demon
Marshall RG-1 Regenerator
Electro-Harmonix/Sovtek (Black) Big Muff Pi

Visit my site for some FREE RE-AMPING! http://www.wix.com/reamps/reamp
#8
Quote by HellBoy9393
SO would you all say having an FX loop in the amp is a significant advantage over having an amp without one? Could just drop the hammer on getting an HT-5 later this year.


If you use modulation effects or intend to slave preamps then yes
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#9
Quote by Mark G
Noise supressors would also generally go in the effects loop.


why? I would put it at the front of the amp, to cut off the hum or whatever before it gets to the distortion etc...

I'd like an FX loop in my amp, i think it's quite an advantage for things like EQ pedals especially
#10
Quote by Ibbod0
why? I would put it at the front of the amp, to cut off the hum or whatever before it gets to the distortion etc...

I'd like an FX loop in my amp, i think it's quite an advantage for things like EQ pedals especially


In front it will do nothing against the noise added by the preamp circuitry and other effects in the loop. Depends on the amp as well, most aren't very noisy to begin with. Ideally you'd get a noise pedal with dual functionality for both in front, and for in the loop.
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#11
As fly135 said, this really is only true when you get distortion from your preamp. My preamp is just as clean and quiet as my power amp, and I get distortion from my pedals, so to me the order of my effects chain is far more important than a loop would be.
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#12
Quote by HellBoy9393
SO would you all say having an FX loop in the amp is a significant advantage over having an amp without one? Could just drop the hammer on getting an HT-5 later this year.
The biggest advantage of the HT-5 is the distortion tones from the SS preamp voicing. And it has an FX loop. So you are good to go with that amp.
#13
Quote by HellBoy9393
SO would you all say having an FX loop in the amp is a significant advantage over having an amp without one? Could just drop the hammer on getting an HT-5 later this year.


In most cases where you have modulation or time based effects... yes. Since it is recommended that modulation or time based effects go after the preamp stage.

However, also note that due to the additional circuit of the effects loop, there will be some level of tone loss compared to an amp that does not have an effects loop, however, I doubt anyone will be able to tell the difference unless you had 2 identical amps, where 1 had an FX loop and 1 did not.
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#14
Quote by fly135
The biggest advantage of the HT-5 is the distortion tones from the SS preamp voicing. And it has an FX loop. So you are good to go with that amp.

Wait, what? HT-5 has an SS pre-amp?
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Unless its electronic drums.

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