#1
ok, so I just bought this awesome book called Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar by Troy Stetina and I think it's awesome so far. Anyways this is my first real guitar book and I'm confused on how I should go through it. It give a longgg list of left hand and right hand exercises and then it talks about making your own practice schedule. My first question so far is, am I supposed to do all those exercises over a period of time before I build the practice schedule?

Does anyone have this book? If so, how did you get through it?
#2
you don't get through it, you use it. Your goal shouldn't be to finish it, your goal should be to learn from it. Once you get out of the left hand, follow the metronome tutorial, and then do that for the rest of the lessons.

and for the practice schedule, you should go through the exercises so you can have an idea of what you should prioritize in your practice.
Last edited by EpSoNiight at Sep 25, 2009,
#3
ok, well I mean there are tons of exercises in the first 28 pages or so. So you're saying I should pick out the exercises that are difficult to me and put them in my practice schedule?
#4
That would be a good idea.
Play each of the exercises a couple of times. Then take the top five or so hardest ones and practice those until you can play them cleanly and correctly at a brisk tempo (say, 100 bpm sixteenth notes). Don't stop doing them after that, but focus on the next five hardest. This will take time, but if you play the exercises correctly, you will become a better player. Also, the exercises force you to focus your practice, which will increase your progress significantly.
#5
Quote by Geldin
That would be a good idea.
Play each of the exercises a couple of times. Then take the top five or so hardest ones and practice those until you can play them cleanly and correctly at a brisk tempo (say, 100 bpm sixteenth notes). Don't stop doing them after that, but focus on the next five hardest. This will take time, but if you play the exercises correctly, you will become a better player. Also, the exercises force you to focus your practice, which will increase your progress significantly.


He should tackle the ones that are a bit easier first. While tackling something hard will improve you faster, if you can't do it properly like easier exercises then you won't be able to do the harder exercises.

What he should do in this practice schedule of his, is have a mixture of the easy and hard ones and do the hard ones after a warm up so his fingers are bit more flexible.

Although, speed is a by product of accuracy and precision, if he can't play it accurately slowly, he won't be able to play it fast. So even then, he should be practicing the easy ones until he can play them accurately, smoothly, and cleanly at the speed he desires to be at, and then move onto the harder ones.
#6
What I was thinking is that if he plays the easy stuff pretty comfortably, he should focus less on them and more on improving the skills necessary to do the harder bits. Obviously, one should start very slowly and work towards perfect accuracy, not towards a faster speed. And I certainly don't recommend he start out playing the hardest parts first. That would just be silly.
#7
Quote by Geldin
That would be a good idea.
Play each of the exercises a couple of times. Then take the top five or so hardest ones and practice those until you can play them cleanly and correctly at a brisk tempo (say, 100 bpm sixteenth notes). Don't stop doing them after that, but focus on the next five hardest. This will take time, but if you play the exercises correctly, you will become a better player. Also, the exercises force you to focus your practice, which will increase your progress significantly.

Thanks to both of you guys for the great advice. I've been running through Rusty Cooley's Legato Workout for about a week now and it's a great exercise. FallsDownStairs, (it's weird to call someone that ) do you think would doing the legato workout suffice for a warm up before moving to the 5 tough exercises that Geldin is speaking of?
#8
Are you good at legato? A good warm up is something that you're good at that gets your hands ready for the fun (read: tough) stuff. If you do something with legato as a warm up, be sure to do something that focuses more on your picking hand too.
#9
Well I would say that I am decent at legato and for picking i just runt through some alternate picking drills.
#10
Quote by mrb1946
Thanks to both of you guys for the great advice. I've been running through Rusty Cooley's Legato Workout for about a week now and it's a great exercise. FallsDownStairs, (it's weird to call someone that ) do you think would doing the legato workout suffice for a warm up before moving to the 5 tough exercises that Geldin is speaking of?


Maybe, it depends if the other exercises are focused around legato. Warming up with legato increases finger strength, but I don't know any of the exercises, so I couldn't tell you for sure.

When it comes to Legato exercises, I just play scales I know or mess around and just use legato. I don't know any specific exercises for it.
Last edited by FallsDownStairs at Sep 28, 2009,
#11
I haven't anything to add to what's already been said, just wanted to post to say you made a great purchase.
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#12
Quote by ChrisN
I haven't anything to add to what's already been said, just wanted to post to say you made a great purchase.

Haha. Thanks

Yeah, Mark Tremonti told me to get it
#13
Quote by FallsDownStairs
Maybe, it depends if the other exercises are focused around legato. Warming up with legato increases finger strength, but I don't know any of the exercises, so I couldn't tell you for sure.

When it comes to Legato exercises, I just play scales I know or mess around and just use legato. I don't know any specific exercises for it.

What types of stuff do you do to warm up?
#15
Quote by breakdown123
would you recommend that book? I've seen it a few times and it looks interesting.

Well I'm not too far into it but I really like it a lot as much as I have done.
#16
would you recommend that book? I've seen it a few times and it looks interesting.


Yes I highly recommend this book.


This is a great book. When you get done with this look into Fretboard Mastery another great book I highly recommend.
If you start a reply with: I have never played one but I have heard good things about it! Your opinion is invalid.
Last edited by boxcarmonument at Sep 29, 2009,
#17
Quote by boxcarmonument
Yes I highly recommend this book.

This is a great book. When you get done with this look into Fretboard Mastery another great book I highly recommend.

Agreed. Got both and they're a fantastic pair.