#1
I've been reading around the web over the years, observing what guitarists have been using as rigs, and I come across MIDI systems all the time.

I've always thought that MIDI was something that composers could use as a direct means to communicate notes to a computer using MIDI, but some guitarists (Matt Bellamy from Muse) use it in their actual rig.

For instance, he has a Kaoss Touchpad from Korg installed in his guitar which uses MIDI, but what does it do and what are the advantages of having it?
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#2
synth,ton of other cool stuff
Quote by angusfan16
I got my sister pregnant once. Yeah, that was awkward, but mostly because she's 6 years younger than me.
#3
Quote by O.O Meow O.O
synth,ton of other cool stuff

Yeah, but how do people use it/utilize it?
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#4
MIDI is music language

How one instrument talks to another instrument

for example if you have a foot pedal connected via midi to a keyboard that footpedal itself can control presets chords, volume, basicalyl control the whole thing

its like a remote control for instruments and presets
#5
I'd also like to know more on this.

I've seen MIDI controlled amplifiers too.

Epiphone Les Paul Standard w/ SD Alnico Pro II's
Fender Aerodyne Telecaster & Stratocaster
Marshall JCM 800 4104 combo


E-Married to Funny_Page
#6
Matt Bellamy uses his X-Y MIDI Pad in his Manson (which is connected to a Korg Kaoss pad as you mentioned) to get a sort-of controlable feedback. Coupled with his on-board fuzz unit...its pretty orgasmic.

Check out Plug in Baby - Muse. When they played Live at Wembley (H.A.A.R.P). should give a clear view of its capabilitys.
| Call me Matt. | | I like music. |
Last edited by Audioslave95 at Sep 26, 2009,
#7
MIDI is, to my knowledge, simply a system that transports commands between units. The sound and sound effects are normal effects that are simply being controlled by the parameters given through the MIDI signal.

Dumbed down, it's basically a series of numbers. These numbers each utilize a specific command in an effects pedal or amp. They aren't sound themselves. Therefore, while a MIDI signal can tell an amp to switch channels, it can also tell a keyboard to send out a specific sound. So yeah, MIDI is just a series of commands, what these commands do is up to the unit being fed with MIDI signals.


EDIT: Just checked wiki: "MIDI does not transmit an audio signal or media — it transmits "event messages" such as the pitch and intensity of musical notes to play, control signals for parameters such as volume, vibrato and panning, cues, and clock signals to set the tempo."

So there you have it.
Last edited by anubiz03 at Sep 26, 2009,
#9
So essentially it orchestrates any musical items you want?

Epiphone Les Paul Standard w/ SD Alnico Pro II's
Fender Aerodyne Telecaster & Stratocaster
Marshall JCM 800 4104 combo


E-Married to Funny_Page
#10
Quote by Chrisiphone
So essentially it orchestrates any musical items you want?


Yeah. If they're set up for it of course.
#11
How do you set it up in your rig?
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#12
If you have used Guitar Pro or similar, every note you input is a midi note, so when the playhead runs it over, it plays it. Like a music box from years ago.
#13
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
How do you set it up in your rig?


You don't, really. If your equipment has midi inputs, you can control them with midi controllers, whether it be keyboards, footswitches, switchboards, a kaoss pad or whatever.
#14
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
How do you set it up in your rig?


There are pedals called midi controllers they have a lead that has 3 - 5 pins

Basically you can set up the controller with presets so you run through the banks and it changes everything that is hooked up to the preset like (lighting, amp settings, keyboard patches, loops and background effects)

You can run it on the fly so that u can change volumes live etc etc

but the instruments need to have a Midi connection to be able to be controlled
#15
You can switch through amp and effect settings with MIDI-footswitches if you have MIDI-compatible amps. So you can basically switch from a clean channel with chorus, delay and reverb to an OD-channel with a gain boost, other reverb settings etc. with stepping onto one footswitch instead of performing a square dance on your pedal-board.
Fender American Special HSS Stratocaster
Ibanez 1987 Roadstar II Deluxe
Yamaha THR10X
Marshall JCM900 SL-X
Ibanez WD-7 Weeping Demon Wah
TC Electronic Polytune
Seymour Duncan Tweakfuzz
#17
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
How do you set it up in your rig?


Well midi is used mostly to control rack based rigs.
Pretty much all current production rack units are midi controllable, and you can also have a unit that has multiple loops and you can put pedals in those loops so you can bypass those pedals. So you have a floorboard at your foot that can control your whole rig instead of having a big pedalboard with pedals in front of your amp, and pedals in thee effects loops so lots of cables going back and forth, and a footswitch for the amp. And also, the idea of all of this, is to have easy acess to presets, so can turn on and off multiple pedals and effects at the press of only one footswitch.
Having that kind of setup is very expensive though.
#18
Righto. I'm considering all this because after observing all the crazy stuff that Matt Bellamy can do, I'm really interested in pushing the boundaries on musical tone and what not.

I think it's pretty cool that he has a Fuzz-Factory in his guitar. Anyone know if it's possible to install a pedal of your choice like he's done it into a normal guitar and be able to control it.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#20
squit gives the best picture +1. but midi is really more than any one answer on here, or even all of them together still won't encompass what midi is capable of. if you want the small one line answer, then midi is a programming language for music, but that is a horribly bad descriptor. midi is just a small group of parameters:

pitch
duration
intensity
instrument

then it also has a set of parameter controls. so you have the ability to define an musical event and the ability to control parameters of those music events. so for example you could make a program that keeps a steady beat off an internal digital clock and then can record midi musical events with the 4 parameters above and be able to score a piece of music. then they can use a series of programmable or real time control signal to change things like volume, panning, effects settings... all in through a number of controllers: cc(continuous contollers like expression pedals), on/off(binary) signals to switch between 2 set conditions, and other more classic synth style ones ones like input thresholds or enveloper followers. basically anything you can program into a computer to analyze input signals you use, which is a lot of stuff.

these signals can be used with all kinds of digital devices that can give and receive these signals:
computers
keyboards/synths
electronic drums
multi effects processors
loopers/sequencers
rack mount effects
lighting equipment/AV
the moog guitar

imagine being able to use the midi out on a moog guitar to send a threshold 0 or 1 signal from the output to control the tempo on your rack mount delay? and trigger a lighting change? and be able to change the guitars volume via midi based on a clock speed provided from a computer that is controlling the metronome to your drummers in ear monitor. the possiblilities are endless in application. and yes you can preset anything you like as well.

another common system for midi application with guitar is hook all your effects through a midi controlled effects looping station and control effect order and on/off status with a midi board(just looks like a big board with a bunch of foot switches on it).
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#21
MIDI in the sense of guitar rigs is not necessarily used to control how things sound, but its used to clean up you guitar rig. Have you seen pedal trays before? that is a component of a midi setup, basically you have a massive midi controller that activates the pedals, instead of the pedals themselves. You can also use this to control your amp and rack units etc... MIDI in the sense of a guitar rig is basically cleaning the physical aspects of your rig up and putting everything in control of a single midi foot controller.
Originally Posted by StewieSwan
schtick_bomb is actually a Tare. An evil race of aliens from the planet Nibiru who have come to fight the power of Jesus Christ.


#22
MIDI Musical Instrument Digital Interface.

It's a standardised protocol (think TCPIP) specifically for music. It's very simple and compact (not much data at all). There is no "music' or audio that is included in the signal. Just 1's and 0's that tell the target machine (synth keyboard, drum pad - or whatever), what to do. Stuff like what pre-set on the target to run (organ, thunder effects, violin, bongos, burp). But whats really cool is that there is information like velocity (keyboard or pad pressure that simulates hitting the keyboard hard or soft), pitch and volume, etc, information that can be transported too. These are applied to the note(s) - or audio that is synced up with the midi.

The audio has to be on the target machine already (or bundled in a project file if you are using a sequencer like Sonar, or Ableton Live) THe signal or audio can be in real time too, (like for Guitar Rig) and is usually dry (like from a guitar with no effects) or a note from a keyboard (the MIDI also include the octave range - so only the note off of middle C is need for reference). So you can mess around with different synth sounds and effects with the same signal to get unlimited sounds and octave ranges (or whatever synths are installed). In the old days, all the synths were pre installed on the hardware ( MIDI keyboard - rack effects, etc) - and were updated with firmware. Now everything is computer based, and you can choose from unlimited synth sounds vie software purchases.
Last edited by 667 at Sep 27, 2009,
#23
Quote by gumbilicious
squit gives the best picture +1. but midi is really more than any one answer on here, or even all of them together still won't encompass what midi is capable of. if you want the small one line answer, then midi is a programming language for music, but that is a horribly bad descriptor. midi is just a small group of parameters:

pitch
duration
intensity
instrument

then it also has a set of parameter controls. so you have the ability to define an musical event and the ability to control parameters of those music events. so for example you could make a program that keeps a steady beat off an internal digital clock and then can record midi musical events with the 4 parameters above and be able to score a piece of music. then they can use a series of programmable or real time control signal to change things like volume, panning, effects settings... all in through a number of controllers: cc(continuous contollers like expression pedals), on/off(binary) signals to switch between 2 set conditions, and other more classic synth style ones ones like input thresholds or enveloper followers. basically anything you can program into a computer to analyze input signals you use, which is a lot of stuff.

these signals can be used with all kinds of digital devices that can give and receive these signals:
computers
keyboards/synths
electronic drums
multi effects processors
loopers/sequencers
rack mount effects
lighting equipment/AV
the moog guitar

imagine being able to use the midi out on a moog guitar to send a threshold 0 or 1 signal from the output to control the tempo on your rack mount delay? and trigger a lighting change? and be able to change the guitars volume via midi based on a clock speed provided from a computer that is controlling the metronome to your drummers in ear monitor. the possiblilities are endless in application. and yes you can preset anything you like as well.

another common system for midi application with guitar is hook all your effects through a midi controlled effects looping station and control effect order and on/off status with a midi board(just looks like a big board with a bunch of foot switches on it).

Yeah, I know about the last one.
Thanks for the info mate.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#24
Quote by nightraven
a super condensed description: MIDI doesn't make sounds - it tells other things to make sounds



Exactly
Originally Posted by StewieSwan
schtick_bomb is actually a Tare. An evil race of aliens from the planet Nibiru who have come to fight the power of Jesus Christ.