#1
I know the pentonic scale, but every time I improv, I play the same thing. What are some things I could do to keep me from sounding the same all the time?
#2
Listen, the most important thing a musician can learn is how to listen. If you listen to great guitar players and songs you like, you'll start to build a repertoire of licks in your head. Eventually you will be able to make the sounds in your head come out of the guitar.
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#3
Fo sho^^

But there are a lot of columns on here about spicing up your improv.

But mostly just listen to your favorite players and hear what they do, after awhile you'll develop your own style based on what you like and you can play what you hear.

Hope this helps!
#4
Say if I wanted to practice some blues improvisation, I just YouTube "Blues Lick Lesson", or something similar.
Eventually, I have enough licks to work my improvisation around, and essentially extends my playing's vocabulary.
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#5
Stop playing the same thing then, it's not rocket science

The problem is that you're not actually "playing the guitar"...all you're doing is mindlessly moving your fingers through some pattern you've learned. You need to start thinking about the sound you want to create and like people have said start listening to what comes out. Currently you're only doing a third of what you need to do to improvise which is the physical actions, the listening and thinking are just as important.

The best thing you can do is actually put the guitar away and spend some time rying to improvise over a backing track without it. Listen to the track , think of what sounds will work and what you could play over it, try to hear it in your head then sing it so you know what it'll sound like. When you've got something, then you can try and work it out on the guitar. At the moment the main problem is you don't really know how to improvise and the guitar is just getting in the way.
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#6
Get some stock phrases that you use often for you basics. Steal little riffs from people, I always use this riff which is like a mix betwewen early clapton, SRV and freddie King, then add your own style to it. If you mix loads of stuff you get a cool sound and ca develop your own style.
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#7
Study some existing solos. Specifically, what you are looking for is the "path" of the solo, almost like it's graph of frequency over time. Look at where each phrase begins and ends, not so much the notes in between.
Now come up with your own path for a solo. Again, not every note, just the big ones, where each section starts and ends. These are kind of your "keyframes" to use an animation term. This part doesn't have to be improvised yet. You improvise between the keyframes. So, this isn't quite 100% improvised, but you are halfway there. As you get better, you will start being able to improvise the path as well.
Make sure you've got a decent library of phrases and fragments you can pull up on the fly to get between A and B.
#8
Quote by steven seagull
Stop playing the same thing then, it's not rocket science

The problem is that you're not actually "playing the guitar"...all you're doing is mindlessly moving your fingers through some pattern you've learned. You need to start thinking about the sound you want to create and like people have said start listening to what comes out. Currently you're only doing a third of what you need to do to improvise which is the physical actions, the listening and thinking are just as important.

The best thing you can do is actually put the guitar away and spend some time rying to improvise over a backing track without it. Listen to the track , think of what sounds will work and what you could play over it, try to hear it in your head then sing it so you know what it'll sound like. When you've got something, then you can try and work it out on the guitar. At the moment the main problem is you don't really know how to improvise and the guitar is just getting in the way.


+1 for you. I was about to suggest the same thing. Anytime I improvise now, I either sing along to what I'm playing, or I hum it. It helps me listen to what I'm playing rather than being silent.
#9
Right, just follow what seagull said! And what im about to say as well!

In addition to the above, learn other people's solos as well. Especially the music you like more. The 'same lick' can be played in may ways if you catch my drift ... you need to work on your phrasing as well. With good phrasing, you can play a lick more than once and it will sound different. So work on that too.