#1
I think I'm getting the idea of improvising over chord progressions ( for example you would use A minor pentatonic or C major scales to improvise over a C - Am - Dm - G chord progression because it's in the key of C and the minor equivalent of C major is A minor, or whatever. I understand that but what scales would you use to improvise over power chord progressions and how do you know what key they're in. For example if you wanted to create your own solo for Metallica - Master of Puppets how are you supposed to tell what key it's in to know what scales to use.
Gear:
Yamaha F310 acoustic
Ibanez RGR321ex
Peavey Vypyr 30
#2
you think metallica know what key there in...coz they dont lol...sometimes u just got to forget the theory and just play...

I think most metallica songs are in E minor tho
#4
look at what notes are in the song EG if it had C, E, F, and G powerchords, you could use a C major scale because the C Major scale is made up of c,c#,d,e,f,f#,g,g#,a# and b.

master of puppets has E5, D5, C5, F5 and B5 i believe... so find the scale that fits. but its a bad eample to use. another way is to look at the solo, identify the notes, and find which scale they're in.
Its Em by the way, most of it is played using a standard box, the one you learn first most of the time with pentatonics. at the 12th fret.
Last edited by texzephyr at Sep 27, 2009,
#5
Ok that makes sense. Quite confusing :/
Thanks.
Gear:
Yamaha F310 acoustic
Ibanez RGR321ex
Peavey Vypyr 30
#6
Quote by texzephyr
look at what notes are in the song EG if it had C, E, F, and G powerchords, you could use a C major scale because the C Major scale is made up of c,c#,d,e,f,f#,g,g#,a# and b.

master of puppets has E5, D5, C5, F5 and B5 i believe... so find the scale that fits. but its a bad eample to use. another way is to look at the solo, identify the notes, and find which scale they're in.
Its Em by the way, most of it is played using a standard box, the one you learn first most of the time with pentatonics. at the 12th fret.


lol ***?


C major scale is C D E F G A B ... no sharps or flats.
#7
Quote by Orethor
you think metallica know what key there in...coz they dont lol...sometimes u just got to forget the theory and just play...

I think most metallica songs are in E minor tho


Since Kirk was taught by Joe Satriani, I'm fairly sure he knows atleast some ounce of theory. All guitarists know theory, just some didn't learn it by book or from reading. They picked it up working with their ear.

I think I'm getting the idea of improvising over chord progressions ( for example you would use A minor pentatonic or C major scales to improvise over a C - Am - Dm - G chord progression because it's in the key of C and the minor equivalent of C major is A minor, or whatever. I understand that but what scales would you use to improvise over power chord progressions and how do you know what key they're in. For example if you wanted to create your own solo for Metallica - Master of Puppets how are you supposed to tell what key it's in to know what scales to use.


A power chord if I recall, is the root and 5th. Chords are classified by their roots. When making a solo based around power chords, find the root of the chord, then take the 5th.
#8
Quote by Orethor
you think metallica know what key there in...coz they dont lol...sometimes u just got to forget the theory and just play...

I think most metallica songs are in E minor tho


Fail, of course Metallica know what key they are in. Burton knew lots of music theory, I'm pretty sure Kirk does too, and Burton taught James a lot of stuff. Think its a coincidence that they do most of their songs in Em? They've been around for 20+ years, they know what key they play in, or Kirk would find it difficult to pick which pentatonic shape to use.
#9
try watching the S&m making of....both james and kirk go on about the conductor telling them their in this key or this time sig and them not knowing what he was on about...

yes cliff knew it all but u think they spent there time talking about all that or you think they spent it drinking hmmm...

Dont get me wrong theory is important, im just trying to make the point that ppl shouldnt get hung up on it
Last edited by Orethor at Sep 27, 2009,
#10
Quote by Orethor
try watching the S&m making of....both james and kirk go on about the conductor telling them their in this key or this time sig and them not knowing what he was on about...

yes cliff knew it all but u think they spent there time talking about all that or you think they spent it drinking hmmm...

Dont get me wrong theory is important, im just trying to make the point that ppl shouldnt get hung up on it


That was most probably an exaggeration, and or joke.
And Cliff did teach them a lot of theory, as well as drinking MASSIVE amounts of vodka.
You shouldn't get hung up on it sure, but it's a very very important tool if you want to be an awesome musician.

LEARN THEORY = BE BETTER THAN GREENDAY. sounds like a good enough reason for me :P
#11
Quote by Orethor
try watching the S&m making of....both james and kirk go on about the conductor telling them their in this key or this time sig and them not knowing what he was on about...


Because at certain times it's been "trendy" for guitarists to pretend they don't know music theory. They know theory.

Quote by Orethor

Dont get me wrong theory is important, im just trying to make the point that ppl shouldnt get hung up on it


I agree.
#12
Wow, is this a 'Metallica do or don't know theory' thread or are you guyz trying to help out and answer the question at hand?

The solo will really depend on the kind of music firstly. You will need to find the 'tonal centre' or the song or whatever and usually you will find that this is the 'sound' that the song brings forth the most. A lot of people find this by hitting note by note up the fretboard from zero to 11 on the E string. Once you have that, figure out the other chords in the song and identify the intervals between them. When you have the intervals down you will be able to discover the mode you're in which is essentially the 'scale' youre in. Major, minor, whatever.

Once you have this figured out, just find where the notes are placed across the fretboard and experiment. Can't tell you HOW to improvise. That's your own creativity to discover. But recognize that you can solo using entire scales or pentatonics or whatever, again dependent on the kind of music you're playing.

All the best.
#13
Quote by texzephyr
look at what notes are in the song EG if it had C, E, F, and G powerchords, you could use a C major scale because the C Major scale is made up of c,c#,d,e,f,f#,g,g#,a# and b.

master of puppets has E5, D5, C5, F5 and B5 i believe... so find the scale that fits. but its a bad eample to use. another way is to look at the solo, identify the notes, and find which scale they're in.
Its Em by the way, most of it is played using a standard box, the one you learn first most of the time with pentatonics. at the 12th fret.

wtf was i on lol? srsly tho, i totally stuffed up the scale... i meant C Major or A minor for the example i used at the start... but somehow managed to get those notes... yeah its c d e f g a b or a b c d e f g respectively... soz bro!
#14
Since I know no theory *but plan to* I just find the root note by figuring out which note sounds good through the whole song.
Gear:

Guitars:
ESP ltd FX-400
Epiphone les paul jr.

Amps:
Line 6 spider II combo 30 watt
Krank Rev. Jr. full stack tube.
#16
Quote by jemeput
I think power chords dun have a specific key of minor and major... rite??
A single power chord is not in itself major or minor, as it has no 3rd, but a progression of power chords can be in a specific major or minor key, based on where it resolves to, what notes are used and what chords are implied.