#1
When I listen to most of my music it sounds like it is all in 4/4, but presumably it seems reasonable that some of it isn't. Like I remember hearing something about Shiver by Coldplay being in some other timing than 4/4. Still it sounds like 4/4 to me, though I haven't listened carefully. So could you suggest any tips on how to discern the time signature or some songs in the indie/alt rock genre that is not 4/4 (not any metal like progressive where I assume there are lots of atypical timings).
Ben Pazolli
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#3
Quote by Mazzakazza
Listen to the drumbeat. Hi-hat/snare rythym is usually easiest to listen for.


What is a typical drum pattern for a non 4/4 timing. I know almost all rock songs in 4/4 go Bass Drum, Snare, Bass Drum, Snare on each quaver. But what would be a similar thing for 3/4? or else?
Ben Pazolli
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Epiphone Dot Studio
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Boss Loop Station RC-2
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"The nicest guy you'll ever f............ind"
#4
alot of indie and rock is in 4/4 time try looking up some folk music, Irish trad music, classical music etc. for different time signatures
#5
Looking it up standard 3/4 seems to be Bass Drum, Snare, Snare.
Ben Pazolli
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VOX V847 WAH-WAH Pedal
Boss Loop Station RC-2
-----------------------
"The nicest guy you'll ever f............ind"
#7
Listen to Kings of Leon - Closer, for an example of 3/4 (aka waltz) timing
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#8
Quote by bpazolli
What is a typical drum pattern for a non 4/4 timing. I know almost all rock songs in 4/4 go Bass Drum, Snare, Bass Drum, Snare on each quaver. But what would be a similar thing for 3/4? or else?


In a triple compound time sig (3/8 6/8 9/9 12/8)
Typically, you'll find the hi-hat accenting the eighth note (1 la li 2 la li etc.) or at the very least accenting the first part of the beat (1 (la li) 2 (la li) etc.
The bass drum will accent one tier of beats, typically on the first part of the beat and the snare will accent the next tier that the bass didn't accent.
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#9
Quote by handlerb
Listen to Kings of Leon - Closer, for an example of 3/4 (aka waltz) timing


6/8 is waltz timing, ONE two three ONE two three, kind of paired 3s if you see what I mean? It's difficult to explain in words. Counted in 8th notes (quavers), 6 to a bar.

3/4 is one two three. Counted in quarter notes (Crotchets), three to a bar.

So they take up the same amount of time at the same bpm, but strictly speaking,
they're not the same.


edit: at above poster, you mean 9/8 right, not 9/9? :p
#10
A lot of Metallica's songs is in different time signatures

EDIT: Didn't read post
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