#1
in little parts like play the verse, stop, then play the pre chorus, then stop again
or would it be better to play the song all the way through over and over until you get it perfect? or does it not make a difference?
#2
i have done both in the past both work fine, it really just depends on how confindent you are in your playing skills, if you think you can play the whole song through go for it, if not do it in pieces in case you screw it up, you won't have to start all over, or you won't have to listen to it all to re edit it
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Quote by classicrocker01
You know you're addicted to gear when you've had more guitars than girlfriends
#4
I find that way easier, it's quite hard and time consuming to have to play say a six minutes song all the way through note perfect and dead on in time...one mistake and you have to start again - and that's just one track...drums bass piano guitars mandolin you name it that's already at best a half hour job if you can play perfect everytime.
It's much easier to record one measure each section of say a rhythm guitar and copy and paste it...this way you can build solid foundations of a song and then twiddle away over the top with more feeling with other instruments
#5
its sounds better to break it down into parts but you still might like the sound of playing the whole way through. just give both a try.
#6
Really you should be recording to a click if your recording individual instruments one at a time and its probably best to record one good, maybe not perfect, run through the complete track. Then go back and re-recored the sections which may contain a playing error or unwanted sound. This is the way i tend to record.

If you can though i prefer the idea and sound of playing with a whole band all mic'ed up and recording one good track again, and then go back and re-record the individual parts which don't quite reach your require standard.
#7
The way a lot of professionals (at least ones I've met/worked with) work is to do a couple of takes for the track, all stored in a comp folder, and then use those to make a good take from if needed and if it is still required, go back using a 'punch in' record feature to tidy up any noticeable errors.
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