#1
alright, so im writing this lit. analysis paper for my english class, and i had a question:
can you use second person in an exordium (that hook sentence at the beginning)?
no one else seems to know for sure?

and the other ones pretty basic, and i dont know why i cant remember, but would possessive be "Peters" or "Peter's"?
#5
I would hazard a guess that it varies from professor to professor, but mine crucifies anyone who uses second person. It is a general no-no for essay writing, but some professors don't have a problem with it. I wouldn't risk it.

Possessive uses the apostrophe, except in rare exceptions like its (that's the only one I can remember).
He's a freak of nature, but we love him so.

Quote by John Frusciante
Music isn't the Olympics. It's not about showing other people what you can do with a piece of wood in your hands that has strings on, it's about making sounds that are good.
#6
2nd person is if you are addressing the reader directly. So are you actually adressing the reader or just generalizing?
#9
I personally prefer to use rhetorical questions as attention grabbers, although my professor this year doesn't like it so much.

I'm assuming you're thinking of something along the lines of : Do you have what it takes to be a member of the US Army?

You can convey the same message, but without using second person, and using more interesting diction, like so: Can an average-Joe citizen transcend mediocrity to become a member of the US Army?

See, the rhetorical question still draws attention, avoids second person, and uses more colorful language. If your professor doesn't mind the rhetorical question use, that would be your best bet.
He's a freak of nature, but we love him so.

Quote by John Frusciante
Music isn't the Olympics. It's not about showing other people what you can do with a piece of wood in your hands that has strings on, it's about making sounds that are good.
#10
Generally you don't want to use second person in an essay, due to the fact that if you're using the reader as an example to a generalization you're trying to prove, it may not be true in some peoples' case, and creates a less effective and weaker point in your essay.

In a literary analysis essay specifically, I don't really see any way you would need to use second person, I could only see it coming out crappily.